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Daydreamer
A causa di non ben precisati "passi falsi", John Lasseter, in un'accorata lettera al team Pixar, si prende un semestre sabbatico a seguito di dissidi interni allo Studio.

Da The Hollywood Reporter

John Lasseter Taking Leave of Absence From Pixar Amid "Missteps"

Disney Animation head John Lasseter is taking a leave of absence from Pixar after acknowledging "painful" conversations and unspecified "missteps," he wrote in a memo to staff on Tuesday obtained by The Hollywood Reporter.

Lasseter is best known as one of the founders of Pixar, which began as a part of the graphics group at LucasFilm. Along with Ed Catmull, he popularized CGI in animation with early films like Toy Story, A Bug's Life and Monster's Inc.

In 2006, after Disney purchased Pixar, Lasseter was named the chief creative officer of both Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios. He has since become the face of all Disney animation, overseeing the recent resurgence of the studio's namesake brand with properties like Frozen and Moana.

Lasseter, who directed Toy Story and Toy Story 2 among other Pixar films, produces or executive produces every Pixar project and he executive produces every WDA feature. While Lasseter has only won two Oscars (one is a specialty Oscar for his work on Toy Story), Pixar has racked up an impressive eight best animated feature wins. Under Lasseter's purview, WDA has picked up three wins, most recently with last year's Zootopia.

Pixar films have grossed over $6 billion at the domestic box office. The Emeryville-based company is set to release their next feature, Coco, on Thanksgiving day. Pixar is currently working on a sequel to The Incredibles and the fourth Toy Story installment. WDA will release the Wreck It Ralph sequel next year.

Lasseter's full memo to employees is below.

I have always wanted our animation studios to be places where creators can explore their vision with the support and collaboration of other gifted animators and storytellers. This kind of creative culture takes constant vigilance to maintain. It’s built on trust and respect, and it becomes fragile if any members of the team don’t feel valued. As a leader, it’s my responsibility to ensure that doesn’t happen; and I now believe I have been falling short in this regard.

I’ve recently had a number of difficult conversations that have been very painful for me. It’s never easy to face your missteps, but it’s the only way to learn from them. As a result, I’ve been giving a lot of thought to the leader I am today compared to the mentor, advocate and champion I want to be. It’s been brought to my attention that I have made some of you feel disrespected or uncomfortable. That was never my intent. Collectively, you mean the world to me, and I deeply apologize if I have let you down. I especially want to apologize to anyone who has ever been on the receiving end of an unwanted hug or any other gesture they felt crossed the line in any way, shape, or form. No matter how benign my intent, everyone has the right to set their own boundaries and have them respected.

In my conversations with Disney, we are united in our commitment to always treat any concerns you have with the seriousness they deserve, and to address them in an appropriate manner. We also share a desire to reinforce the vibrant, respectful culture that has been the foundation of our studios’ success since the beginning. And we agree the first step in that direction is for me to take some time away to reflect on how to move forward from here. As hard as it is for me to step away from a job I am so passionate about and a team I hold in the highest regard, not just as artists but as people, I know it’s the best thing for all of us right now. My hope is that a six-month sabbatical will give me the opportunity to start taking better care of myself, to recharge and be inspired, and ultimately return with the insight and perspective I need to be the leader you deserve.

I’m immensely proud of this team, and I know you will continue to wow the world in my absence. I wish you all a wonderful holiday season and look forward to working together again in the new year.

John


EDIT: Notizia Choc, a quanto pare ci sarebbero accuse di molestie sessuali a carico di Lasseter post-6-1111346575.gif

Da The Hollywood Reporter

John Lasseter's Pattern of Alleged Misconduct Detailed by Disney/Pixar Insiders

One longtime Pixar employee says Lasseter was known for “grabbing, kissing, making comments about physical attributes.”
Rashida Jones is still credited as a writer on Toy Story 4, the next installment in the beloved franchise. But, sources tell The Hollywood Reporter, the actress and her writing partner at the time, Will McCormack, left the project early on after John Lasseter, the acclaimed head of Pixar and Walt Disney Animation, made an unwanted advance.

Jones and McCormack did not respond to repeated requests for comment. Disney declined to comment on the alleged incident though a studio source said the departure was over "creative differences."

Based on the accounts of former Pixar insiders as well as sources in the animation community, the alleged incident was not an isolated occurrence. One longtime Pixar employee says Lasseter, who is well-known for hugging employees and others in the entertainment community, was also known by insiders for “grabbing, kissing, making comments about physical attributes.” Multiple sources say Lasseter is known to drink heavily at company social events such as premiere parties but this source says the behavior was not always confined to such settings.

Now Lasseter is taking a leave of absence from Pixar after acknowledging "painful" conversations and unspecified "missteps," he wrote in a memo to staff on Tuesday.

"I have always wanted our animation studios to be places where creators can explore their vision with the support and collaboration of other gifted animators and storytellers," Lasseter stated. "This kind of creative culture takes constant vigilance to maintain. It’s built on trust and respect, and it becomes fragile if any members of the team don’t feel valued. As a leader, it’s my responsibility to ensure that doesn’t happen; and I now believe I have been falling short in this regard."

It is hard to overstate Lasseter’s value to Disney. He is known as the genius behind Pixar films from Toy Story to the upcoming Coco. He took charge of Walt Disney Animation in 2006 and lead a revival that included such gigantic hits as Frozen and Inside Out.

Sources say some women at Pixar knew to turn their heads quickly when encountering him to avoid his kisses. Some used a move they called “the Lasseter” to prevent their boss from putting his hands on their legs. A longtime insider says he saw a woman seated next to Lasseter in a meeting that occurred more than 15 years ago.

“She was bent over and [had her arm] across her thigh,” he says. “The best I can describe it is as a defensive posture ... John had his hand on her knee, though, moving around.” After that encounter, this person asked the woman about what he had seen. “She said it was unfortunate for her to wear a skirt that day and if she didn’t have her hand on her own right leg, his hand would have travelled.”

The same source said he once noticed an oddly cropped photo of Lasseter standing between two women at a company function. When he mentioned that to a colleague, he was told, “We had to crop it. Do you know where his hands were?”

Another former insider remembers awkward encounters with Lasseter, who liked — as many in the industry do — to hug in meetings. “You’d hug him and he’s whisper in your ear, a long time,” this person says. “He hugged and hugged and everyone’s looking at you. Just invading the space.”

Lasseter is best known as one of the founders of Pixar, which began as a part of the graphics group at LucasFilm. Along with Ed Catmull, he popularized CGI in animation with early films like Monster's Inc. In 2006, after Disney purchased Pixar, Lasseter was named the chief creative officer of both Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios. He has since become the face of all Disney animation, overseeing the recent resurgence of the studio's namesake brand with properties like Frozen and Moana.

While Lasseter has only won two Oscars (one is a specialty Oscar for his work on Toy Story), Pixar has racked up eight best animated feature wins. Under Lasseter's purview, WDA has picked up three wins, most recently with last year's Zootopia.

Pixar films have grossed over $6 billion at the domestic box office. The Emeryville-based company is set to release their next feature, Coco, on Thanksgiving day. Pixar is currently working on a sequel to The Incredibles and the fourth Toy Story installment. WDA will release the Wreck It Ralph sequel next year.
veu
Ormai questa cosa delle molestie ci sembra un po' troppo strumentalizzata...
che le molestie accadano è vero, però ormai si parla solo di quello. Le accuse dovrebbero essere valutate prima di spiattellarle in piazza perché il problema è che questa situazione venga portata all'esasperazione, con conseguenti ritorsioni anche in termini di credibilità...
Rafekky
Eh no, eh. Pure Lasseter adesso no. Questa cosa (non in generale, solo il caso Lasseter), se è vera, se è più seria di quanto sembri, mi urta parecchio.
Angelo1985
Da La Repubblica di oggi

"LOS ANGELES - A parlare intaccando anche il mondo dell'animazione, è stato un dipendente della Pixar. John Lasseter, il direttore creativo della Pixar e dei Walt Disney Studios da molti considerato un innovatore e il moderno Walt Disney (ha creato Toy Story e prodotto da Frozen a Inside Out), era noto per "abbracci, baci, commenti sugli attributi fisici", non desiderati. Quindi inopportuni, quindi molestie, quindi denunce.

Fonti anonime hanno raccontato all'Hollywood Reporter che Rashida Jones sceneggiatrice in Toy Story 4, nonché attrice, e il suo socio di scrittura Will McCormack, avevano lasciato il progetto appena all'inizio proprio a causa delle advances indesiderate di Lasseter. Contattati direttamente i due però non hanno rilasciato commenti né una propria versione dei fatti.

Ma oggi Lasseter ha comunicato che prenderà sei mesi di aspettativa. Non solo. Ha spiegato di aver preso la decisione dopo una serie di "conversazioni difficili" e chiesto scusa per "abbracci indesiderati o altri gesti che possano essere stati fastidiosi". La Disney gli ha dato il suo supporto e scritto di "apprezzare la sua sincerità".

Molti tra i dipendenti sostengono che Lasseter è anche noto per bere pesantemente durante gli eventi aziendali, le prime dei film, o le feste. Nel congedarsi, sebbene provvisoriamente, il capo della Pixar ha comunque riconosciuto i suoi "passi falsi", non meglio specificati, e scritto una nota di scuse rivolta allo staff.

"Ho sempre desiderato che i nostri studi di animazione fossero luoghi in cui i creatori potessero esprimere la loro visione con il supporto e la collaborazione di altri animatori e narratori di talento", ha affermato Lasseter. "Questo tipo di cultura creativa richiede una costante vigilanza da mantenere, basata sulla fiducia e sul rispetto, e diventa fragile se i membri del team non si sentono valorizzati. In qualità di leader, è mia responsabilità garantire che ciò non accada; e ora credo di non essere stato all'altezza di questo compito, e so di aver mancato su questo punto".

Lasseter ha vinto due Oscar, uno, speciale, per il suo lavoro su Toy Story. Sotto la sua supervisione la Wda ha raccolto tre vittorie, la più recente con Zootopia lo scorso anno. I film Pixar hanno incassato oltre 6 miliardi di dollari solo al botteghino americano. La compagnia di Emeryville ha
pubblicato il suo prossimo film, Coco, il giorno del Ringraziamento. Pixar sta attualmente lavorando a un sequel degli Incredibili e al quarto episodio di Toy Story. La Wda pubblicherà il sequel di Ralph spaccatutto il prossimo anno."

Che dire? Se lui stesso ritiene di dover congedarsi per un po', o ha capito di averla fatta troppo grossa oppure, seppur per questioni blande, sa di essere ricattabile e preferisce prendere tempo.
In entrambi i casi, per quanto mi riguarda, non è altro che un suino ubriacone, da rimuovere all'istante dai WDAS, un soggetto simile è chiaramente inadatto a un ruolo tanto importante e delicato.
E non è questione di moralismo ipocrita, ma di etica, non si possono sentire storie di "abbracci" e bevute a go go, ormai siamo abituati allo schifo più immorale che, pur di avere "Frozen - Stagione 10", si potrebbe pure sorvolare su simili condotte.
E invece no.

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LucaDopp
La cosa non mi sorprende più di tanto. Quello che non capisco è perché si allontani solo dalla Pixar. Vogliamo credere che queste cose le abbia fatte solo in uno studio e non nell'altro?
Scrooge McDuck
Da Badtaste:

Dopo l’Hollywood Reporter e Variety, tocca a Vanity Fair.
Il magazine ha pubblicato un nuovo report sulla vicenda John Lasseter aggiungendo nuovi dettagli e testimonianze.
Come noto da qualche ora, l’uomo dietro l’intera divisione animata della Disney (direttore creativo sia dei Walt Disney Animation Studios che dei Pixar Animation Studios) e consigliere creativo principale dei Walt Disney Imagineering, ha annunciato attraverso un memo ai suoi impiegati di aver deciso di prendersi una pausa di sei mesi con effetto immediato.

Nel pezzo vengono descritti alcuni accadimenti in cui il comportamento “poco consono” di Lasseter sarebbe emerso in svariate occasioni creando non pochi grattacapi alla dirigenza della Disney e “situazioni tossiche” per i dipendenti della Pixar.
Nel 2010, dopo il trionfo di UP agli Oscar, John Lasseter sarebbe stato l’argomento di una tesa telefonata fra gli executive della Casa di Topolino e della Pixar, fra i quali il presidente della Pixar e dei Walt Disney Animation Studios Ed Catmull, il production chief dei Walt Disney Animation Studios Andrew Millstein, il corporate communications chief della Disney Zenia Mucha e altri (che non vengono indicati dal report). Durante un party degli Oscar, Lasseter avrebbe baciato alla francese e elargito carezze non richieste a una dipendente della Disney (che non è più impiegata della major e che non ha risposto alle molteplici richieste di un commento fatte da Vanity Fair).
Una fonte avrebbe rivelato all’outlet che:
L’argomento della telefonata in sostanza è stato “Merda, che cosa dobbiamo fare con John?”. Lasseter è come il tredicenne pazzerello e sempre arrapato che devi tenere d’occhio tutto il tempo. Ma non c’è un numero 2 per John. È il cuore pulsante di Disney Animation e Pixar. È un genio. Nessuno può fare quello che fa lui.
Un altro dipendente ha descritto un viaggio di lavoro a un Festival fatto con l’executive e della richiesta fatta da Lasseter di portarlo a uno strip-club:
Voleva dei balletti e, poi, indicava me quando si trattava di pagare. Dava per scontato che lo intrattenessi. Una situazione disagevole. Ma a lui piace divertirsi e piace il vino.
Alcune dipendenti donne hanno parlato del fastidio generato dalle “attenzioni fisiche” del CCO, come i già citati abbracci e baci sulla bocca. Una ex impiegata ricorda che, durante una sessione di registrazione, è avvenuto un incontro poco convenzionale con Lasseter:
Si è chinato in avanti verso il monitor del mio PC e mi ha sussurrato in un orecchio “Sei così bella, quella luce nei tuoi occhi”. Ma l’ha detto nel modo in cui te lo direbbe il tuo amante. Poi mi ricordo che era solito toccarmi la schiena, la gamba il ginocchio e mi sentivo un po’… ugh! E poi si parlava di lavoro. E tu te ne stavi al tuo semplice posto “di ragazza”. In cui il tuo punto di vista veniva completamente minimizzato. C’è una ragione se le donne non hanno mai avuto troppo successo alla Pixar. La leadership è tutta maschile.
Secondo un dipendente della Pixar, stanno già circolando dei rumour relativi al fatto che possa essere il regista di Inside Out e Up, Pete Docter, a prendere le redini dello studio (anche se non viene specificato se si tratti di una soluzione temporanea o permanente).
Ovviamente vi terremo aggiornati…


Io sono semplicemente sconvolto.
Al di là del fatto che ho sempre reputato Lasseter un mio mito a cui ispirarmi (solo ieri era l'anniversario del suo viaggio a Milano in occasione del quale mi feci autografare il the art of Cars), trovo TERRIBILE che i vertici Disney abbiano permesso il crearsi di un clima di questo tipo nei suoi Studios. Qui ad essere giudicato non dovrebbe essere solo il comportamento di John Lasseter che, se confermato, si dimostrerebbe SQUALLIDO, ma anche quello dei vari dirigenti in capo alla Disney che hanno taciuto per tutti questi anni.

A questo punto mi auguro che questo mare di letame che si sta levando da Hollywood continui il più a lungo possibile.
winnie & pimpi
Più che di accuse si tratta di ammissione di colpa. Infatti la Disney ha risposto dicendo che apprezza la sincerità di Lasseter.

Non serve negare dato che questi atteggiamenti avvenivano sotto gli occhi di tutti, per cui ci fa più bella figura ad ammettere le sue responsabilità e sparire per 6 mesi per far calmare le acque. Un po' come voleva fare Weinstein. Il futuro penso dipenda da come si svilupperanno le cose e se dovessero venir fuori storie più gravi.

Inutile comunque accusare queste persone di essere dei mostri. La verità è che succede spessissimo, non solo nel mondo del cinema, ma ovunque. E' un problema culturale. Questi atteggiamenti purtroppo fino a poco tempo fa erano ritenuti al massimo delle "bravate".

Per la cronaca la Disney è stata citata in giuduzio anche per il caso Weinstein, accusata, ai tempi della Miramax, di aver saputo e di aver coperto Weinstein. Questo anche perchè i contratti per comprare il silenzio delle vittime venivano stilati proprio dalla Miramax e con i soldi dello studio.
Daydreamer
Diversi sul forum, compreso il sottoscritto, hanno accusato le pellicole Pixar, nonché le ultime produzioni Disney, di essere troppo maschiliste e di ritrarre i personaggi femminili in maniera stereotipata e con connotati "masculi". Ebbene dalla dichiarazione di Rashida Jones (che mette a tacere le accuse di molestie sessuali subite) sembra trovare credito anche questa ipotesi "maschiocentrica":

Da BadTaste via Entertainment Weekly

La rapidissima velocità con cui i giornalisti hanno indicato il prossimo colpevole rende alcuni report del tutto irresponsabili. Non abbiamo lasciato la Pixar a causa di avance non richieste. Si tratta di un’affermazione falsa. Le nostre strade si sono divise per motivi principalmente creativi e, cosa più importante, per via di differenze nella filosofia del lavoro. C’è un’incredibile quantità di talento alla Pixar e rimaniamo grandissimi fan delle pellicole prodotte dallo studio. Detto ciò, si tratta anche di un luogo con una cultura del lavoro dove le voci e le opinioni creative delle donne e delle persone di colore non ricevono adeguato sostegno.

e ribadisco le parole già pubblicate di un'ex impiegata:

...poi si parlava di lavoro. E tu te ne stavi al tuo semplice posto “di ragazza”. In cui il tuo punto di vista veniva completamente minimizzato. C’è una ragione se le donne non hanno mai avuto troppo successo alla Pixar. La leadership è tutta maschile.
Fra X
Siamo in periodo un pò di caccia alle streghe anche. La situazione di Lasseter per ora è tutt' altro che chiara. All' inizio avevo pensato pure ad uno scherzo sui social che aveva fatto. ohmy.gif

CITAZIONE (LucaDopp @ 22/11/2017, 13:04) *
Quello che non capisco è perché si allontani solo dalla Pixar.


Già! unsure.gif

CITAZIONE (winnie & pimpi @ 22/11/2017, 14:54) *
Il futuro penso dipenda da come si svilupperanno le cose e se dovessero venir fuori storie più gravi.


Già!

CITAZIONE (Scrooge McDuck @ 22/11/2017, 13:26) *
A questo punto mi auguro che questo mare di letame che si sta levando da Hollywood continui il più a lungo possibile.


Per ora mi sembra si tenda a sparare più che altro nel mucchio. Chi ci capita ci capita. Certo, il caso di Lasseter è un pò a parte.
LucaDopp
CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 22/11/2017, 18:09) *
Detto ciò, si tratta anche di un luogo con una cultura del lavoro dove le voci e le opinioni creative delle donne e delle persone di colore non ricevono adeguato sostegno.

Praticamente le stesse accuse che sono state fatte a Walt nel corso degli anni. Curioso.
winnie & pimpi
CITAZIONE (LucaDopp @ 22/11/2017, 20:21) *
Praticamente le stesse accuse che sono state fatte a Walt nel corso degli anni. Curioso.

...non siamo più negli anni '30 però
Angelo1985
CITAZIONE (winnie & pimpi @ 22/11/2017, 21:40) *
...non siamo più negli anni '30 però


Eh, ma qui si sa, pur di difendere Lasseter lo si accosta anche a paragoni infelici, sia professionali che personali.

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Rowena84
È un brutto colpo per la Disney-Pixar, ma se le accuse sono confermate anche dai dirigenti c è poco da fare...
Che la Pixar fosse terribilmente maschilista non c'è proprio dubbio e la cosa si riflette sui film prima di Inside out.
I WDAS invece a me sembra stiano migliorando e vedo sempre voci femminili nel processo produttivo anche se non in primissimo piano, e si nota tantissimo (Judy e Elsa sono personaggi fantastici)
Scrooge McDuck
CITAZIONE (winnie & pimpi @ 22/11/2017, 14:54) *
Inutile comunque accusare queste persone di essere dei mostri. La verità è che succede spessissimo, non solo nel mondo del cinema, ma ovunque.


Beh insomma, vallo a dire che non sono dei mostri alle donne che sono state molestate dal loro capo o che hanno subito violenze psicologiche.. che sia una cosa comune non vuol dire che questi individui non vadano accusati e perseguiti, ANZI.
LucaDopp
Non mi pare di aver difeso nessuno... Che neanche Walt fosse un santo è risaputo, ma mica è una scusante.
Rowena84
Quello che però non ho capito è se Lasseter fosse un molestatore o semplicemente, come si dice dalle mie parti 'un rattuso', un uomo anzianotto che fa commenti fastidiosi non richiesti e che se puoi cerchi di evitare. Nel secondo caso sarebbe comunque da condannare e dovrebbe subire pene pecuniarie, ma distruggergli la carriera mi sembra eccessivo.
winnie & pimpi
CITAZIONE (Scrooge McDuck @ 23/11/2017, 12:09) *
Beh insomma, vallo a dire che non sono dei mostri alle donne che sono state molestate dal loro capo o che hanno subito violenze psicologiche.. che sia una cosa comune non vuol dire che questi individui non vadano accusati e perseguiti, ANZI.

intendo dire che ci sarebbe da fare un "mea culpa" generale della società, invece è sempre più conveniente dare tutta la colpa al singolo individuo, come se fosse cresciuto in una caverna. Puoi anche fermare a arrestare Lasseter e Weinstein, ma non risolvi il problema se non intervieni a livello culturale.

CITAZIONE (Rowena84 @ 23/11/2017, 14:23) *
Quello che però non ho capito è se Lasseter fosse un molestatore o semplicemente, come si dice dalle mie parti 'un rattuso', un uomo anzianotto che fa commenti fastidiosi non richiesti e che se puoi cerchi di evitare. Nel secondo caso sarebbe comunque da condannare e dovrebbe subire pene pecuniarie, ma distruggergli la carriera mi sembra eccessivo.

si parla soprattutto di mani addosso alle dipendenti, palpate, carezze, mano sulla gamba ecc...
Fra X
CITAZIONE (winnie & pimpi @ 23/11/2017, 16:15) *
intendo dire che ci sarebbe da fare un "mea culpa" generale della società, invece è sempre più conveniente dare tutta la colpa al singolo individuo, come se fosse cresciuto in una caverna. Puoi anche fermare a arrestare Lasseter e Weinstein, ma non risolvi il problema se non intervieni a livello culturale.


Già! E non mi pare stia succedendo a dispetto di certi proclami. sleep.gif
theprinceisonfire
Oh, giorno glorioso!

Gioite, il re della plastica è caduto!




Addio, non ci mancherai!
LucaDopp
A me pare che per il momento non sia caduto proprio nessuno.
Fra X
CITAZIONE (LucaDopp @ 26/11/2017, 0:54) *
A me pare che per il momento non sia caduto proprio nessuno.


E per ora non se ne parla neanche più! blink.gif
Enrico
Come non se ne parla più?

https://movieplayer.it/news/pixar-i-comport...ritiche-_54990/

La Disney sapeva, non riesco proprio a capire perchè non abbiano preso provvedimenti.

Comportamento gravissimo.
LucaDopp
Mah a me dà fastidio che in questo come in quasi tutti i recenti "scandali" non ci sia stata alcuna denuncia effettiva. Solo indiscrezioni e nessuna prova.
Enrico
Quelle di John Lasseter non sono indiscrezioni.

I dirigenti Disney sapevano di questi suoi vizi, ma lo hanno lasciato al suo posto per non perdere il suo incredibile talento creativo.
Comportamento altrettanto deplorevole.
Fra X
CITAZIONE (Enrico @ 2/12/2017, 11:38) *


L' articolo però è del 29 novembre e parla di cose già dette. Su Weinstein uscivano cose nuove ogni ora e anche di Spacey se n' è parlato quasi ininterrottamente.

CITAZIONE (LucaDopp @ 2/12/2017, 23:07) *
Mah a me dà fastidio che in questo come in quasi tutti i recenti "scandali" non ci sia stata alcuna denuncia effettiva. Solo indiscrezioni e nessuna prova.


Anche a me. Mah!
Fra X
CITAZIONE (Enrico @ 2/12/2017, 11:38) *


L' articolo però è del 29 novembre e parla di cose già dette. Su Weinstein uscivano cose nuove ogni ora e anche di Spacey se n' è parlato quasi ininterrottamente.
brigo
Ta-daaaahhh!!!

James Levine

LucaDopp
CITAZIONE (Enrico @ 4/12/2017, 21:02) *
Quelle di John Lasseter non sono indiscrezioni.

I dirigenti Disney sapevano di questi suoi vizi, ma lo hanno lasciato al suo posto per non perdere il suo incredibile talento creativo.
Comportamento altrettanto deplorevole.

Sono tutte indiscrezioni, non c'è una sola prova di tutto ciò se non il comunicato della Pixar (che però non dice quali fossero i comportamenti di Lasseter). Non sto dicendo che sia tutto falso, ma nemmeno andrebbero presi per oro colato articoli pieni di "sembrerebbe" e verbi coniugati allo stesso modo, e che nemmeno dicono da quali fonti prendono le informazioni.
winnie & pimpi
CITAZIONE (LucaDopp @ 5/12/2017, 1:19) *
Sono tutte indiscrezioni, non c'è una sola prova di tutto ciò se non il comunicato della Pixar (che però non dice quali fossero i comportamenti di Lasseter). Non sto dicendo che sia tutto falso, ma nemmeno andrebbero presi per oro colato articoli pieni di "sembrerebbe" e verbi coniugati allo stesso modo, e che nemmeno dicono da quali fonti prendono le informazioni.


Non ci sono accuse, ma una lettera scritta da John Lasseter dove ammette di aver avuto atteggiamenti inopportuni sul posto di lavoro. Non ci sono indagini da fare perchè è lui stesso ad averlo ammesso e la Disney ha ringraziato per la sua sincerità. Cos'altro serve? Voler conoscere maggiori dettagli intimi è solo morboso.

intanto Forbes ritiene che alla Pixar gioverebbe se Lasseter si ritirasse del tutto, definendo poco insipirati gli ultimi film, Coco compreso
Pixar will be betteroff with Lasseter gone
Scrooge McDuck
CITAZIONE (winnie & pimpi @ 5/12/2017, 9:50) *
Cos'altro serve?


Un’indagine e un processo, per dirne una.
Non si può sentire che uno si auto-sospende. Hai commesso un reato? Paghi, e a deciderlo dovrebbe essere un giudice.
Shirleyno01
Come si dice qui a Napoli... "Assa fa'!"
Lasseter per quel che mi riguarda ha distrutto la Disney coi quei suoi filmetti per mentecatti. La vera Disney è quella di Walt, di "Biancaneve e i sette nani", "Dumbo", "Bambi", "Pinocchio", "Fantasia", "Peter Pan" e chi ne ha più ne metta. La vera Disney è quella dei disegni fatti a mano, quella di Mary Blair, Ub Iwerks, Fred Moore e tanti altri. Proprio per questo neanche a me mancherà Lasseter, anzi mi auguro che dopo queste GRAVISSIME accuse non gli facciano mai più rimettere piede negli studi Disney (o meglio, quel poco o nulla che rimane di Disney).
Shirleyno01
CITAZIONE (brigo @ 5/12/2017, 1:23) *
Ta-daaaahhh!!!

James Levine



eheheh.gif Perfetto (si fa per dire)! Molestatori dappertutto, pure in Fantasia (2000)!
Shirleyno01
Gia' che ce so' me levo st'artro peso co' Lasseter e co' la Pixar tutta:
https://youtu.be/xSsffD18mdI
Angelo1985
CITAZIONE (Scrooge McDuck @ 5/12/2017, 15:14) *
Un’indagine e un processo, per dirne una.
Non si può sentire che uno si auto-sospende. Hai commesso un reato? Paghi, e a deciderlo dovrebbe essere un giudice.


Ma infatti spero che si apra un'indagine e che le autorità facciano quello che devono, anche solo appurare la necessità di un risarcimento a coloro che hanno subito molestie; ad oggi, possiamo solo prendere atto della sua confessione e auto-sospensione e fare un augurio per il futuro degli Studios.
Quello che mi aspetto, però, è che anche chi sapeva e non ha fatto nulla passi qualche guaio, perchè non sarebbe nemmeno giusto il messaggio di punire solo il colpevole e non chi ha guardato dall'altra parte.
Pure questo è importante!

icon_mickey.gif
brigo
CITAZIONE (Shirleyno01 @ 5/12/2017, 17:49) *
eheheh.gif Perfetto (si fa per dire)! Molestatori dappertutto, pure in Fantasia (2000)!


Foto da me scelta non a caso. (non guarderò più la scena con gli stessi occhi blink.gif )
Daydreamer
Da BadTaste

John Lasseter: il suo ritorno alla guida della Pixar e dei Walt Disney Animation Studios sarebbe “improbabile”

[...]
È di nuovo l’Hollywood Reporter a scrivere che nella giornata di domani i dipendenti dei Disney Animation Studios parteciperanno a una “Giornata dell’Ascolto” durante la quale, insieme a svariati addetti delle risorse umane, discuteranno di eventuali preoccupazioni inerenti l’ambiente di lavoro. Il meeting – che un veterano descrive come senza precedenti per lo studio – sarebbe stato organizzato poiché, secondo alcuni bene informati, il ritorno di John Lasseter sarebbe alquanto improbabile, anche se un altro esponente di lunga data dei Disney Animation Studios – rimasto anonimo – sostiene che si tratterebbe di un appuntamento per sondare gli animi circa l’eventualità di un rientro di Lasseter.
C’è anche chi è convinto che le rivelazioni sul comportamento del CCO sarebbero incompatibili con la leadership di brand Disney così forti e c’è anche chi svela al magazine che in realtà meeting come quello di giovedì si erano già tenuti (una voce in contraddizione con la prima citata quindi) e avrebbero avuto come oggetto proprio i “passi falsi” di John Lasseter. L’Hollywood Reporter racconta che quando, anni fa, il co-fondatore della Pixar Ed Catmull ha consegnato a Lasseter il feedback ottenuto dai dipendenti, questi si sarebbe infuriato così tanto al punto da non rivolgere la parola a Catmull per una settimana.
In una situazione poco chiara come questa, i rumour su il o i nomi di chi andrà a sostituire Lasseter come CCO della Pixar e dei Walt Disney Animation Studios continuano a rincorrersi. Sono in molti a credere che la prima realtà citata verrà guidata da due veterani del Pixar Brain Trust, i registi Pete Docter e Andrew Stanton, mentre la divisione animata della Disney finirà “nelle mani” di un triumvirato composto da Jennifer Lee (Frozen), Rich Moore e Byron Howard (Zootropolis, Ralph Spaccatutto).
Ovviamente vi terremo aggiornati…
veu
Anche noi abbiamo sentito parlare del triumvirato Lee - Moore - Howard per i WDAS
Angelo1985
Mah, l'idea del triumvirato la trovo impraticabile, arriva un momento in cui deve esporsi una vera leadership; la Lee andrebbe rimossa per prima, non è che siccome hai fatto 1 film di successo, arrivi e comandi a bacchetta. Non so, mi sembra facciano le cose proprio a c**zo di cane.

Per quanto riguarda il porco maniaco ho solo una cosa da dire:

A CASA!!!

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Enrico
Vanno bene tutti (pure la Lee che ha fatto un film di successo, che poi in realtà ha sceneggiato anche Ralph e Zootropolis eh) basta che non facciano rientrare quel grassone.
Fra X
"Poco chiara" Termine più appropriato non ci poteva essere. Mah! La si finirà di parlare per enigmi?

CITAZIONE (Angelo1985 @ 1/2/2018, 9:25) *
arriva un momento in cui deve esporsi una vera leadership


Già!
Fra X
https://www.fastcompany.com/40551146/inside...asseters-return

Ad un mese dalla fine dell' autospensione tornerà, non tornerà... boh! Il bello o il brutto è che tutto o quasi tace!
Mi fa strano leggere che uno studio che ha quasi 100 anni di storia sia una realtà meno consolidata di un altro che ne ha poco più di 30. eheheh.gif Vabbé che ci si riferisce allo staff odierno in generale. Comunque se Lasseter non dovesse tornare la questione si porrà ovviamente sul lungo termine.
veu
Dal sito Hollywood Reporter

"He Who Must Not Be Named": Can John Lasseter Ever Return to Disney?

As the most powerful man in animation nears the end of a six-month "sabbatical" for personal "missteps," CEO Bob Iger must soon determine his fate. But a close look at the career and workplace behavior of the Pixar mogul reveals a man much darker, angrier and, at times, more abusive than "the happy-ass guy in the Hawaiian shirt," the purported Walt Disney of the digital age.

The night of the Oscar ceremony March 4 brought another triumphant moment for The Walt Disney Co. when Coco scored two awards, including best animated feature. The win marked the 12th top Oscar in the past 15 years for Pixar Animation Studios or Disney Animation Studios, and with ticket sales of more than $780 million worldwide, Coco was another box-office win, too.

The acceptance speeches included thanks to many people, but one name was conspicuously omitted: John Lasseter, the absent chief creative officer of both pillars of Disney's animation empire. "He who must not be named," marvels one animation veteran who, like many, won't talk about Lasseter on the record. Lasseter, 61, was on what Disney described as a six-month "sabbatical"; in an October memo to staff announcing the leave, he had acknowledged unspecified "missteps." As The Hollywood Reporter first reported then, Lasseter was known by insiders for grabbing, kissing and making comments about physical attributes of women. Multiple sources said Lasseter drank heavily at such company events as premiere parties. Now, with the six months of his leave drawing to a close, many animators are convinced that Lasseter will not return. Disney remains mum, but multiple sources believe that Disney chairman and CEO Bob Iger is prepared to bid Lasseter goodbye. "Bob is about keeping peace in the family," says one Disney veteran. "He's not anxious to take on defending somebody with that kind of reputation."

Insiders say Lasseter had amassed so much power that his underlings at one point told Iger they needed to check with Lasseter before carrying out Iger's instructions. Now if Lasseter returns, there is likely to be a negative reaction from some employees at Pixar and Disney who felt that Lasseter had bullied and belittled them and hogged credit for years. Finally, there is the issue of his conduct with female employees. "If John goes back, it will kill women in animation," says a former Pixar insider. "The message will be so clear: Shut up and take it."

Disney does not appear to be preparing to send that message. In February, the company held an unprecedented "day of listening" at the Disney animation unit and brought in a handful of human-resources professionals to facilitate a discussion of workplace concerns. More recently, Pixar employees learned that longtime human resources chief Lori McAdams — seen by many as one of Lasseter's chief protectors — was leaving the company. McAdams did not respond to a request for comment.

Lasseter's departure would be a sad denouement for the burly figure in brightly patterned shirts who is perhaps the most famous living person in the animation world; the man who co-founded Pixar, resuscitated Disney Animation and played a key part in giving the world a series of brilliant, beloved, childhood-defining films that reaped billions in box office. "No single artist since Walt Disney has had as much of an impact on animation as John Lasseter," says Tom Sito, a veteran animator and the former head of USC's Division of Animation and Digital Arts. "John really was the person who guided computer graphics and animation together to create this new medium."

It began with 1995's Toy Story, which was followed by one hit after another: A Bug's Life; Monsters, Inc.; Finding Nemo, to name just a few. After Disney bought Pixar in 2006, Lasseter took on the studio's faltering animation unit, which then cranked out such hits as Frozen, Zootopia and Moana.

But interviews with a broad swath of animators and executives who crossed paths with Lasseter over the years suggest that as he achieved great success and power, he became increasingly imperious. At Pixar, some insiders called him "King John" and various other uncomplimentary nicknames. "He changed drastically as success and money came," says one former colleague. Another longtime Pixar executive says Lasseter's image as a Walt Disney of the digital age — as a whimsical, childlike genius with a wall-to-wall collection of toys and memorabilia in his office ­— concealed a darker reality. "The public didn't see that," this person says. "The happy-ass guy in the Hawaiian shirt? That was a well-crafted persona."

In the early going, the outlook for Toy Story was not good. Based on Lasseter's success with short films at the nascent Pixar, Disney asked him to make the first full-length computer-animated movie. But as the project progressed, some top Disney executives were unimpressed and considered pulling the plug. Then in his 30s, Lasseter "was a pretty humble guy who had a movie that was struggling to find itself," says an executive who worked with him at the time. There was no sign of "these issues that revealed themselves over the years." With $7 million already invested, then-Disney studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg stayed the course. The reward in 1995 was a hit so unexpected ($373.6 million worldwide) that the company was caught flat-footed without Toy Story toys and other merchandise to sell. Lasseter, who had been let go from Disney's animation unit a little more than 10 years earlier, was on his way.

As Toy Story was followed by a dazzling run of hits, former colleagues at Pixar say Lasseter became jealous of potential rivals and intolerant of criticism. "The only person who could give John notes was Steve Jobs," says one, referring to Pixar's majority shareholder in that early era. "There was a level of fear that permeated senior management." Another says Pixar became "this cult of the infallible genius." Lasseter had younger proteges like Pete Docter, who directed Monsters, Inc., and Andrew Stanton, who directed Finding Nemo, but those were talents he had nurtured. With others, says an executive who worked with Lasseter, "You could be 'in' one day but if you did something he didn't like, he could turn and cause a lot of damage." A former Pixar insider says Brad Bird was able to thrive on his 2004 film The Incredibles only because he had been hired by Jobs, who saw to it that Bird was able to assemble and run his own team.

Sources say among those whom Lasseter eventually pushed aside was legendary Disney animator Glen Keane, who drew Ariel in The Little Mermaid and the Beast in Beauty and the Beast. Back in 1983, Keane and Lasseter — then both at Disney — had collaborated on a test combining drawn animation and computer-generated images. ("In five years these tests will seem so primitive, they'll look like Steamboat Willie does today," Lasseter said presciently at the time.) When computers came to dominate the field, associates say that Keane, unlike some who made their names in hand-drawn animation, successfully navigated the transition to the new technology. He left Disney in 2012, and this year won an Oscar for his work with Kobe Bryant on the short Dear Basketball. He's now directing an animated feature for Netflix. Another casualty was Don Hahn, whose producing credits include Who Framed Roger Rabbit, Beauty and the Beast and The Lion King. "He was one of the most successful animation producers of all time," says a Disney veteran. "John treated him like shit." (Keane and Hahn both declined to comment.)

By the mid-2000s, Jobs had become concerned about Lasseter, according to a former high-level associate. The Apple co-founder may not have been comfortable with one man wielding so much power at Pixar, but there was more. Lasseter could be "mean" and "vindictive" while drinking, this person says. "He had ballooned up. Steve was afraid he would have a heart attack." Jobs wanted Lasseter to cut back on drinking and lose weight. "Steve tried," the executive says. "But then Steve got sicker. He wasn't around anymore."

Former Lasseter associates say for many years, Jobs was not the only governor on Lasseter's engines. Joe Ranft was a towering presence both literally and figuratively — brilliant at story and a talented writer, animator and voice actor. He had a great gift for injecting sweetness and humanity into scripts. And according to many contemporaries, he commanded Lasseter's respect. As he had little interest in the limelight, he also did not present a threat.

Ranft had met Lasseter in the late 1970s, when both were students at CalArts, the southern California art school co-founded by Walt Disney. He worked at Pixar starting with Toy Story. "Joe was a gentle giant," says one executive who knew him. "When everyone was freaking out, Joe was the calm one." A former Pixar insider who worked with Ranft says his basic decency operated on those around him: "No one wanted to look bad in front of Joe. [And] Joe could call bullshit on John in a way no one else could. Joe wasn't afraid of John ­— not even 1 percent."

In August 2005, Ranft was a passenger in a car heading to an annual spiritual retreat in Mendocino when the 2004 Honda Element veered off a cliff and rolled 120 feet into 14 feet of water. Several sources who knew both men say when Ranft died tragically at 45, Lasseter lost much more than just a talented colleague. "Joe was his Jiminy Cricket," says a person who was close to Ranft, adding that with his death, "I think John might have lost his moorings." Coinciding as it did with Jobs' cancer battle, the death signaled that the checks on Lasseter were gone.

"I was enjoying my life at Pixar and then Joe died," says another person who fell afoul of Lasseter. "I didn't realize how Joe had been protecting me. It's amazing how one person's life can keep things from going south."

Even before Lasseter's domain expanded to include Disney animation, employees had become wary of his wandering hands. Some say they employed a move they called "the Lasseter" to prevent their boss from putting his hands on their legs. One longtime insider says he saw a woman seated next to Lasseter in a meeting that occurred more than 15 years ago. "She was bent over and [had her arm] across her thigh," he says. "The best I can describe it is as a defensive posture ... John had his hand on her knee, though, moving around." After that encounter, this person asked the woman about what he had seen. "She said it was unfortunate for her to wear a skirt that day and if she didn't have her hand on her own right leg, his hand would have traveled."

In 2010, one former Pixar insider says Lasseter was spoken to — this person assumes by Iger; Disney would not comment — regarding an incident that occurred the night before Up won best animated feature at the Oscars. At a party that evening, Lasseter, who is married, was seen indiscreetly making out with a Disney marketing employee. For a time after that, his behavior was muted; he later told an associate that he had gotten into trouble and as a result was drinking only beer at a company event.

Over time, sources say, there were complaints to human resources at both Pixar and Disney Animation. (Disney declined to comment.) A former insider says the thinking was, "We have to do everything we can to protect John from himself and keep the truth from the public."'

Jorgen Klubien is a controversial figure in animation circles: A strong-willed Dane who can be blunt to a fault, he is seen as talented but difficult. Whether his faults outweigh his artistry or vice versa is a matter of opinion. Klubien met Lasseter in 1978 when Klubien, then 20, was offered a scholarship to the nascent CalArts animation program. At the time, Lasseter was an award-winning senior. (Tim Burton was a junior.) Klubien and Lasseter became friends, traveled to Europe together and met each other's families. Both were hired at Disney and for a time, they shared a house near the studio.

Disney was in a relatively fallow period. The two were put to work on The Fox and the Hound. Lasseter, who by several accounts was not an especially talented draftsman, left the company in 1984. "He wasn't really in love with drawing like a lot of us were," Klubien says. Technology held more appeal. "For him, it was more about 'How can we get to do animation in this medium?' "

For a time, Klubien and Lasseter went their separate ways; Lasseter met Ed Catmull, who invited him to work at a new Bay Area computer graphics unit within Lucasfilm. Ultimately, Steve Jobs bought that unit and it became Pixar, with Catmull and Lasseter in leadership roles.

In 1993 — while Toy Story was still in the works — Klubien was hired to work on Pixar's second movie, A Bug's Life. He was credited for helping develop the story and as a storyboard artist but came away feeling that he had not been credited properly as a writer on the film. Concluding that the way to advance was to pitch his own idea for a movie — as Docter had done with Monsters, Inc. — he asked his lawyer, who also represented Lasseter, how to best go about pitching as a Pixar employee. He says he was advised simply to talk to Lasseter.

Inspired by a Disney short called Susie the Little Blue Coupe, Klubien pitched Lasseter on a movie featuring talking cars. Lasseter liked the idea and told him to start drawing to flesh it out. Klubien says he worked for three months on drawings of settings and characters that appear very similar to those in the finished film. Then he pitched the project to Lasseter again but got no immediate response.

He went to work on Monsters, Inc. and Toy Story 2. But then he heard that Lasseter wanted to move ahead on a cars movie. He checked in with Lasseter, who said he did want to go forward but with a different plot from the one Klubien had proposed. With that, Klubien and Ranft set to work on scripting and illustrating the main beats of the new story and, according to Klubien, created a version that had all the main elements of the finished movie. Klubien went with Lasseter as he pitched the project first to Jobs and then to a top team from Disney, including then-CEO Michael Eisner and Roy Disney. "John was great at pitching the story, mentioning me as one of the inspirations for him wanting to do this," Klubien remembers. After the meeting, Eisner wrote in an email: "This is totally original and wonderful."

Klubien believed Lasseter had promised he could co-direct the film. Instead Lasseter named himself as the sole director. Klubien was told his consolation prize would be a story and co-writing credit, shared with Ranft and Lasseter. But Klubien says that while Lasseter gave notes, he was not involved in the day-to-day writing of the script. In meetings on the project, Klubien says, Lasseter often seemed to echo things that he or Ranft had just said — but the person taking notes included only Lasseter's words, making it appear that Lasseter had originated thoughts he was merely repeating. Klubien adds that he had observed the same tactic during the making of A Bug's Life.

Finally, Lasseter shocked Klubien by taking him off the film altogether. Klubien remained at Pixar, developing other ideas, and says he came up with several, including one called The Spirit of New Orleans that he thinks eventually may have morphed into the 2009 Disney film The Princess and the Frog. In 2003, Klubien was fired from Pixar after 10 years at the company. He says he was told that no one wanted to work with him. After that, he says, he found it difficult to get hired elsewhere, a problem that he thought was compounded because he believed his credits did not reflect all of his work at Pixar.

In the end, Klubien says he got a $50,000 payment for the Cars idea. It did little to diminish his disappointment. "I didn't even get invited to the premiere or to Cars Land when it opened," he says, referring to the 12-acre attraction at Disney's California Adventure Park. "I went with my family to see Cars Land and they had a whole museum of how the film and the Cars Land ride was made. And not a sketch, not a mention of my name in it."

Klubien continues: "I was the creative spark behind this franchise. It's John's genius that he got it going, that he was the master of Pixar. And if he had allowed me to be part of it all, I would've been his biggest champion. But I find it to be an abusive thing that he got rid of me to claim sole inventorship." He says Lasseter used to advise people in plain language to learn to take credit. "The thing for me is, why can't you say what it really was?" Klubien says. "You're great enough in that role. What's wrong with that? I just don't get it."

A number of Pixar veterans say the company never had a welcoming environment for women. A glimpse of that became public in 2011, when Brenda Chapman, who had originated the idea for Brave and was in the middle of directing it, was pushed aside and replaced by Mark Andrews. She had been the first woman director of a Pixar feature and received a shared credit when the film was released in 2012. No other woman has ever received a directing credit on a Pixar movie, and no woman has ever been a member of the famed Pixar "Brain Trust," though some have attended meetings.

(Longtime Pixar producer Darla Anderson, one of the few women in the upper echelons of the company, departed in March. While her exit was presented as amicable, sources say there had been complaints about bullying conduct — though one former associate says Anderson's actions were no worse than behavior that was accepted from men. Anderson declined to comment.)

Though Chapman has remained largely mum on her sidelining, she wrote in a 2012 essay in The New York Times that it was "truly distressing" to be replaced by a man on a film that "came from a very personal place, as a woman and a mother." Without addressing Pixar specifically, she continued: "Sometimes women express an idea and are shot down, only to have a man express essentially the same idea and have it broadly embraced. Until there is a sufficient number of women executives in high places, this will continue to happen."

Rashida Jones was hired as a writer on Toy Story 4 but left the project early. Multiple sources say that before Jones exited, Lasseter made an unwanted advance toward her. When THR first reported this Nov. 21, Jones did not deny the incident but said she and her producing partner "did not leave Pixar because of unwanted advances." She then took a shot at the company's culture, adding that "women and people of color do not have an equal creative voice" at Pixar. (A Disney spokesperson says "THR chose to credit only anonymous sources in its original character assassination story [about Lasseter] and then was forced to issue a major factual correction that its entire story hinged on. THR is doing it again based on nothing more than anonymous sources and rumor-mongering." [Editor's Note: No correction was ever issued.]) Another former Pixar insider says she and other women were mostly relegated to supporting roles and expected "to make it seem like the men knew what they were doing." Some women at the company came up with the term "bitchy mommy-wives" to describe the role they were expected to play.

In recent years, this former insider says, it became harder to help Lasseter maintain his image of infallibility, such as when the release date of Pixar's The Good Dinosaur was pushed from November 2013 to May 2014 to November 2015. It was clear that the original approach was troubled, but Lasseter had not reached that conclusion on his own and no one had mustered the nerve to tell him. "He couldn't give notes or fix it," this person says. Ultimately Pixar revised the entire film in a frantic, all-hands rescue effort, scuttling most of the voice talent, including John Lithgow and Neil Patrick Harris. The final product was considered Pixar's first financial disappointment and was shut out of Oscar nominations.

At this point, some insiders believe Iger is quietly preparing to name new heads of Pixar and Disney Animation — those floated include Docter for Pixar and Rich Moore and Jennifer Lee at Disney Animation. But some veterans are angry, saying that the company allowed Lasseter to dominate — and to take credit for the work of others — for too long, only acting in the wake of the #MeToo movement.

"All of his behavior was condoned," says a longtime animator. "It wasn't just the drinking. It was his never having grown up. Some of senior management believed that was part of the secret ingredient when really the secret ingredient was a group of people."

Fra X
Mamma mia! Diciamo tanto di noi italiani, ma questi ammerecani... sick.gif
winnie & pimpi
CITAZIONE (Fra X @ 5/5/2018, 13:48) *
Mamma mia! Diciamo tanto di noi italiani, ma questi ammerecani... sick.gif

nono è diverso in Italia
Daydreamer
Da The Wrap

Disney Considers John Lasseter Return in Limited, Creative Role (Report)

Disney has discussed bringing embattled Pixar boss John Lasseter back to the company in a new role, six months after the head of the studio’s animation division took a self-imposed sabbatical following reported complaints of workplace misconduct.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Disney executives are weighing a new role that would give Lasseter less managerial power but full creative influence over the studio’s considerable animated projects. The proposed new scenario would see Lasseter’s ability to hire or fire staff “removed or contained,” the report said.

A Walt Disney Company spokesperson did not immediately return TheWrap’s request for comment.

A homecoming for the powerful executive would be a departure from how many Hollywood companies have handled men accused of misconduct in the #MeToo era. Reported accusations against Lasseter detailed unwanted hugs and inappropriate interpersonal communication. Disney did not formally impose the leave of absence but let him volunteer.

The studio has a history of accommodating the two-time Oscar winner. The Los Angeles Times reported in early May that Lasseter’s “physical contact sometimes crossed the line and upper management worked diligently to protect the director from his own behavior.”

That report cited almost 10 Pixar employees who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

Last November, Lasseter announced he would be taking leave and apologized for what he called “missteps” in his interactions with staffers, which he said made some “feel disrespected or uncomfortable.”

Lasseter said the time would provide an opportunity for him to take “better care of myself, to recharge and be inspired, and ultimately return with the insight and perspective I need to be the leader you deserve.”

The announcement followed a Hollywood Reporter story in which an undisclosed number of “former Pixar insiders” said that Lasseter had frequently made a habit of “grabbing, kissing, making comments about physical attributes” of women at the company.

Lasseter is best known as one of the founders of Pixar and directed films such as “Toy Story,” “A Bug’s Life,” “Toy Story 2,” “Cars” and “Cars 2.” After Disney purchased Pixar in 2006, Lasseter was named the chief creative officer of both Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios, where he oversees all the media giant’s animated films and projects as executive producer.

Lasseter won Academy Awards for Best Animated Short Film (“Tin Toy”) and one Special Achievement Award for “Toy Story.” Pixar itself has won eight Academy Awards and the films have grossed over $6 billion at the box office, domestically.
veu
Ufficiale! Lasseter uscirà dalla Disney alla fine dell'anno.
A sostituirlo probabilmente Pete Docter (regista di Inside Out) per la Pixar e Jennifer Lee (regista di Frozen) per la Disney Animation.

Dal sito Hollywood Reporter:

John Lasseter to Exit Disney at End of the Year

Directors Pete Docter and Jennifer Lee are expected to take on added roles at Pixar and Disney Animation.
John Lasseter, the creative force behind both Pixar Animation and Walt Disney Animation, is officially exiting his post as chief creative officer of both animation studios at the end of this year, the Walt Disney Co. said.

Until then, he will have a consulting role with the company through Dec. 31.

Disney did not name replacements for Lasseter, but Jennifer Lee, director of Frozen, and Pete Docter, director of Inside Out, are expected to take on greater roles at Disney Animation and Pixar, respectively.

In announcing Lasseter's departure at the end of the year, Robet Iger, Disney chairman and CEO said, "John had a remarkable tenure at Pixar and Disney Animation, reinventing the animation business, taking breathtaking risks, and telling original, high quality stories that will last forever. We are profoundly grateful for his contribution, which included a masterful and remarkable turnaround of The Walt Disney Animation Studios. One of John's greatest achievements is assembling a team of great storytellers and innovators with the vision and talent to set the standard in animation for generations to come.

The decision follows a sabbatical where the fate of the most powerful man in animation had been up in the air. On Nov. 21 last year, acknowledging unspecified “missteps” that left some employees feeling “disrespected or uncomfortable,” Lasseter, 61, announced he would take a six-month leave of absence in order “to start taking better care of myself, to recharge and be inspired, and ultimately return with the insight and perspective I need to be the leader you deserve.”

Lasseter is one of the founders of Pixar, which began as part of the graphics group at Lucasfilm. Along with Ed Catmull, he popularized CGI in animation with early films like Toy Story, A Bug's Life and Monsters Inc.

In 2006, after Disney purchased Pixar, Lasseter was named the chief creative officer of both Pixar and Walt Disney Animation Studios. He has since become the face of all Disney animation, overseeing the recent resurgence of the studio's namesake brand with properties like Frozen and Moana.

Lasseter, who directed Toy Story and Toy Story 2 among other Pixar films, produces or executive produces every Pixar project and he executive produces every WDA feature. While Lasseter has only won two Oscars (one is a special Oscar for his work on Toy Story), Pixar has racked up an impressive eight best-animated feature wins. Under Lasseter's purview, WDA has picked up three wins, most recently with 2016's Zootopia.

Pixar films have grossed more than $6 billion at the domestic box office. The Emeryville-based company latest feature is Coco, which grossed more than $450 million worldwide in its first three weeks of release. Pixar is currently working on a sequel to The Incredibles and the fourth Toy Story installment. WDA will release a Wreck It Ralph sequel in 2018.
Daydreamer
Speriamo che l'ingresso di un possibile leader donna possa portare nuova linfa e creatività ai WDAS. Per il resto, tutto è stato abbastanza prevedibile, certamente qualcosa è sfuggito e potrebbe essere stato ingigantito rispetto alla realtà, in epoca #metoo siamo invischiati in un nuovo "maccartismo" nell'industria del cinema, spesso anche ipocrita, come spesso negli USA, si stanno facendo tante vittime sul campo e per ora si vedono solo condanne. Speriamo arrivino anche i benefici.
Scrooge McDuck
Era ampiamente prevedibile. Resto titubante all’idea di mettere a capo degli Studios degli ottimi registi perché non capisco quanto le due cose céntrino, però era inevitabile che si dovesse allontanare Lasseter (anche se penso che continueranno a consultarlo).
Penso anche che sia giusto. Alla fine di tutto quest’uomo, per quanto sia un genio, ha avuto atteggiamenti irrispettosi verso altre persone e ha creato un pessimo ambiente di lavoro attorno a sé, quindi sono d’accordo con la decisione di allontanarlo definitivamente.
LucaDopp
CITAZIONE (Scrooge McDuck @ 9/6/2018, 10:13) *
Resto titubante all’idea di mettere a capo degli Studios degli ottimi registi perché non capisco quanto le due cose céntrino

Saranno direttori creativi, come lo era Lasseter. Il presidente rimane Catmull. Anche se a quanto pare il potere effettivo di Lasseter era più ampio di quanto sarebbe dovuto essere.
Angelo1985
Concordo; a prescindere dalle impressioni professionali, con l'aria che tira sarebbe stato troppo strano che rimanesse; e cmq è giusto così, d'altra parte lui stesso ha ammesso i fatti.
E' chiaro che c'è un gran fuggi fuggi sul carro del #metoo tanto da chiedersi dove fossero negli ultimi 25 anni tutte queste persone, ma fa parte del circo, si sa.

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