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veu
Bob Iger e la Disney hanno già riferito in più occasioni che verrà realizzato un adattamento a musical su Frozen - il Regno di Ghiaccio.
Una conferma arriva da questo link:

FrozenTheMusical.com

E qui un bozzetto relativo ai costumi di scena:

Cenerina
Wow, che notizia meravigliosa! Che tempi di realizzazione ci sono solitamente?
winnie & pimpi
CITAZIONE (Cenerina @ 13/10/2014, 9:19) *
Wow, che notizia meravigliosa! Che tempi di realizzazione ci sono solitamente?

posso volerci anche 5 anni per preparare un musical!
Filippo
Che io sappia quei bozzetti appartengono a quelli del Frozen on ice e non del musical per Broadway.
veu
Da Dailymail:

New songs warm up Frozen for Broadway

The team that will turn Frozen into a stage musical have been warming up a few ideas about getting it into a theatre by 2017.

Kristen Anderson-Lopez and her husband (and song-writing partner) Robert Lopez, who wrote the hit Let It Go (among others), met Jennifer Lee, the film’s writer and co-director; Thomas Schumacher, who heads Disney Theatricals; and Alex Timbers, who directed the recent National Theatre and New York Public Theatre hit show Here Lies Love.

Timbers, who also directed Peter And The Starcatcher for Disney, spent several days having various sessions with the Frozen creative team. Lee is writing the show’s book, working closely with the Lopez duo to shape how the animated film, which has become a phenomenal global hit, can be adapted for the stage.

The Lopezes have already written a couple of new songs for the show. The expectation is that if the right theatre — and, presumably, the right climate — can be found, then Frozen could be up, ready and skating into a Broadway theatre the year after next.

The film featured the voice of Idina Menzel as ice Queen Elsa, but she won’t be in the stage production.


Da TheaterMania:

Is a Frozen Musical Only Two Years Away From Broadway?

A director is in place and the Oscar-winning songwriting team is crafting a score.

The hotly anticipated stage version of the Disney animated feature film Frozen is aiming for a 2017 debut, London's Daily Mail reports.

Alex Timbers, the Tony-nominated director behind Here Lies Love, Rocky, and Peter and the Starcatcher, has been taking meetings with the creative team and is expected to helm the production. Jennifer Lee, who penned the screenplay of the 2013 film, is expected to write the book, with the film's Oscar- and Grammy-winning songwriters, Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez, crafting a full score to go along with movie tunes like "Let It Go."

Frozen, which tells the story of a princess who sets off to find her estranged sister, won 2014 Oscars for Best Animated Feature and Best Original Song. It grossed over $1.3 billion in worldwide box office revenue. The cast of the film is led by Tony Award winner Idina Menzel as Elsa and Kristen Bell as Anna, alongside Santino Fontana, Jonathan Groff, and Josh Gad.

Complete timeline, casting, and theater information have not been officially announced. It is expected that the production will make its debut on Broadway.

UPDATE, February 13: Disney Theatricals President and Producer Thomas Schumacher has released the following statement regarding the Frozen musical: "As has already been announced, Disney Theatrical is working on a stage adaptation of the animated film Frozen. It will come as no surprise that the EGOT-winning Broadway veteran Robert Lopez and the Oscar and Grammy winning Kristen Anderson-Lopez, who wrote the indelible songs for the film, will be working on the show and that Oscar winner Jennifer Lee, co-director and screenwriter of the film, will be working on the book of the stage version. No other staffing or dates have been announced."
Antox
CITAZIONE (winnie & pimpi @ 13/10/2014, 10:13) *
posso volerci anche 5 anni per preparare un musical!

Ammazza tutto sto tempo mellow.gif
veu
News: il musical Frozen uscirà nella versione Pre-Broadway nell'estate del 2017, mentre approderà a Broadway nella primavera 2018.

Dal sito Broadway World:

Breaking News: FROZEN is Officially Headed to Broadway; Timeline and Creative Team Set!

Long rumored, for the first time in forever, it's official -- Frozen, a new musical based on Disney's Academy Award®-winning musical film, is slated to join Disney hits Aladdin and The Lion King on Broadway at a theatre to be announced in spring 2018, Disney Theatrical Productions announced today on Twitter @FrozenBroadway.

Frozen will play its out-of-town tryout beginning in summer 2017 at a theatre to be announced.

As previously announced, Frozen features music and lyrics by creators of the film score Kristen Anderson-Lopez (In Transit, Up Here) and Robert Lopez (Avenue Q, The Book of Mormon, Up Here) and a book by Jennifer Lee(Wreck-It Ralph), the film's screenwriter and director (with Chris Buck). Frozen won 2014 Oscars® for Best Song ("Let It Go") and Best Animated Feature.

Golden Globe Award and Obie winner and two-time Tony Award®nominee Alex Timbers (Peter and the Starcatcher, Here Lies Love, Amazon'sMozart in the Jungle) is Frozen's director and Tony-winner Peter Darling(Billy Elliot, Matilda) is choreographer.

The design team for Frozen includes scenic and costume design by seven-time Tony Award winner Bob Crowley (Mary Poppins, The Coast of Utopia, An American in Paris), lighting design by five-time Tony Award winner Natasha Katz (Aladdin, An American in Paris, The Glass Menagerie) and sound design by four-time Tony nominee Peter Hylenski (The Scottsboro Boys, Motown, After Midnight).

Two-time Tony Award winner Stephen Oremus (Avenue Q, Wicked, The Book of Mormon) is music supervisor and creates vocal and incidental arrangements.

Casting and Broadway dates and theatre will be announced at a future date.

Frozen is produced by Disney Theatrical Productions, under the direction of Thomas Schumacher.


Sito ufficiale:

http://www.frozenthemusical.com/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/FrozenBroadway

Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/FrozenBroadway/

veu
Dal sito Broadway.com:

We Can't Hold It Back Anymore! Betsy Wolfe Tapped to Play Elsa in Frozen; Listen to Her 'Let It Go'

It looks like she’s the queen! Broadway alum Betsy Wolfe will take on the mammoth power anthem “Let It Go” as Elsa in the musical adaptation of Frozen, according to reports from the New York Post. The Disney musical, directed by Alex Timbers, is set to hit the Great White Way in spring 2018 and is eyeing a bow at the St. James Theatre, the current home of Something Rotten!.

The show, featuring the beloved tunes (and some new ones) by married songwriting duo Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez and a book by screenwriter Jennifer Lee, will first play an August 2017 out-of-town tryout in Denver, Colorado.

Frozen marks a reunion for Wolfe and the creative team: In 2015, she starred in the world premiere production of Up Here at San Diego’s La Jolla Playhouse. The musical was also directed by Timbers and featured a score by the Lopezes.

Wolfe made her Broadway debut in 110 in the Shade and has gone on to tread the boards in Everyday Rapture, The Mystery of Edwin Drood and Bullets Over Broadway. She also starred in the off-Broadway revival of The Last Five Years and in Merrily We Roll Along at City Center Encores!.

Check out Wolfe spiraling her soul in frozen fractals all around Carnegie Hall (with Bobby Lopez on the piano) below!

veu
News:

* Il musical di Frozen avrà più di 20 canzoni.

* Il libretto del musical è scritto dalla regista del film, Jennifer Lee.

Dal sito Playbill:

Exclusive: Frozen Songwriters Announce Stage Musical Will Have Over 20 Songs

Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez reveal they are developing a lot of new music for the forthcoming stage adaptation.

Frozen songwriters Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez were in attendance at the April 25 Actors Fund gala, where they spoke to Playbill exclusively about development on the upcoming stage adaptation of Disney’s hit animated film musical .

The songwriting duo, who are preparing to head into a developmental workshop for the show next week, revealed that the musical is set to feature a large number of new songs. “The movie only has seven-and-a-half songs, and we’ve written about 23...As many songs that are in the movie, we've doubled it, and then there are reprises,” said Anderson-Lopez. “There’s a lot of new material – using some of the motifs that you already know from the movie – but going much deeper into all of the characters.”

Lopez added that during development, the focus will be on adapting iconic moments from the movie so that they have the same impact on the stage. “The story is still the same,” said Lopez. “We just needed to adapt the same story. We can’t really do huge, big action sequences on stage; you can’t really do close-ups on stage, so all of those moments that are so iconic from the film need to transform and become musical theatre moments onstage. That’s the focus of our work.”

“Every time Elsa has a giant close-up and you learn so much story through her eyes, it became a song,” added Anderson-Lopez.

“We have a very short time to develop this and make it what it is,” she continued. “It’s the first time we’ve ever written it at the same time that it’s being designed, so there’s a lot of talk, a lot of communication.”

The out-of-town premiere will play Denver Center's Buell Theatre in summer 2017 prior to a spring 2018 Broadway arrival. The production reunites Lopez and Anderson-Lopez with original screenwriter and co-director Jennifer Lee, who is writing the musical’s book.

It was recently reported that the role of Elsa had been cast in the musical, but a spokesperson for Disney said April 26 that no roles have yet been officially cast.

The production will be directed by Alex Timbers ( Here Lies Love, Peter and the Starcatcher) and choreographed by Tony winner Peter Darling ( Billy Elliot).

Frozen is being produced by Disney Theatrical Productions, under the direction of Thomas Schumacher. It's the latest in a series of stage adaptations of Disney animated films that has included Beauty and the Beast, The Lion King, Tarzan, The Little Mermaid and Aladdin.
veu
Dal sito Deadline:

‘Frozen’ Musical Switches Gears With Director & Choreographer Change

Alex Timbers has exited as director of Frozen, the in-the-works musical based on the wildly successful Disney animated movie. The move comes after an Actors Equity casting notice posted yesterday for a fall development lab for the project in New York that listed Timbers as director. It also listed Christopher Gattelli as choreographer, confirming another switch that had been rumored meaning original Billy Elliot choreographer Peter Darling is also out.

No new director has been named.

Frozen has long planned a spring 2018 Broadway bow, with a pre-Main Stem run at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts beginning in summer 2017.

“Making the tough calls when creating a new Broadway musical is never easy, but this was especially painful,” said Thomas Schumacher, President of Disney Theatrical Productions, in a statement released to the press today. “Alex Timbers is one of the most exciting and innovative theatre directors I know, and we’ve proudly worked with him from my support of the early development of Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson through our work together on Peter And The Starcatcher. Though we have chosen to go in another direction with this role, we are committed to seeing Frozen’s tremendous theatrical potential brought to life onstage.”

Timbers and Disney Theatricals previously teamed on Peter And The Starcatcher, which earned him a Tony nomination in 2012. His most recent credit is the musical Rocky.

Variety reported the news of Timbers’ exit first this morning.

veu
News:

* Il coreografo di Newsies si sta occupando di coreografare il musical di Frozen.

Ancora un articolo sul licenziamento di Tombers. Dal sito NYTimes:

Disney Dismisses Alex Timbers as Director of ‘Frozen’ Musical

That’s cold! Disney has dismissed the director of its Broadway-bound “Frozen” musical.

The company said Thursday that it was seeking a replacement for the director, Alex Timbers, a much-praised artist whose previous collaboration with Disney, as one of two directors of “Peter and the Starcatcher,” brought him a nomination for a Tony Award.

Disney issued a brief statement that did not explain the change. “Disney Theatrical Productions and director Alex Timbers have parted ways on the upcoming Broadway musical ‘Frozen’,” the company said. “Announcement of a new director for the project will be made in the near future.”

The president of Disney Theatrical, Thomas Schumacher, offered a few more details in a separate statement. “Making the tough calls when creating a new Broadway musical is never easy, but this was especially painful,” he said.

“Alex Timbers is one of the most exciting and innovative theater directors I know, and we’ve proudly worked with him from my support of the early development of ‘Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson’ through our work together on ‘Peter and the Starcatcher’,” Mr. Schumacher added. “Though we have chosen to go in another direction with this role, we are committed to seeing ‘Frozen’s’ tremendous theatrical potential brought to life onstage.”

The change in directors, although noteworthy given the prominence of this project, is not without precedent. Rob Marshall voluntarily left “Hairspray” while it was in development, and Jason Moore left “The Book of Mormon,” under less happy circumstances, while that show was in development. Disney previously changed directors between pre-Broadway productions of the musical “Aida.”

A Disney spokesman said it was not clear what impact, if any, the “Frozen” change would have on that show’s developmental timeline. The company previously said it intended to mount a production of the musical beginning next August at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, and to bring it to Broadway in the spring of 2018.

The show is to feature music and lyrics by the same couple who collaborated on songs for the hit 2013 animated film, Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, and a book by Jennifer Lee, who was the film’s screenwriter and co-director.
veu
Dal sito Broadway.com:

Betsy Wolfe, Patti Murin & Okieriete Onaodowan Led Lab of Broadway-Bound Frozen

We can’t hold it back anymore—we have more news about the Broadway-bound Frozen stage adaptation. Betsy Wolfe (Bullets Over Broadway), Patti Murin (Lysistrata Jones) and Okieriete Onaodowan (Hamilton) recently played Elsa, Anna and Kristoff, respectively, in a lab of the Disney tuner.

According to the New York Post, casting is not yet confirmed for later incarnations of the show, which as previously reported will make its world premiere at the Buell Theatre in the Denver Center for the Performing Arts in August 2017. Directed by Alex Timbers, the production is scheduled to hit Broadway in Spring 2018. The Post writes that Frozen has booked the St. James Theatre.

The Disney musical, featuring the beloved tunes (and some new ones) by married songwriting duo Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez and a book by screenwriter Jennifer Lee, will have choreography by Peter Darling.

The production has an all-star design team lined up: set and costume designer Bob Crowley, lighting designer Natasha Katz and sound designer Peter Hylenski. Stephen Oremus will serve as music supervisor.

Frozen follows two royal sisters, Elsa and Anna, whose relationship is put to the test when Elsa’s magical ice powers are unleashed during a power anthem that you’re still singing under your breath. Also in the mix are a strapping iceman, his reindeer, a fast-talking snowman and a too-good-to-be-true prince. We probably didn't need to explain that to you.

The film won Oscars in 2013 for Best Animated Feature and Best Original Song (for “Let It Go”) and featured the vocal talents of several Broadway favorites, including Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, Josh Gad, Santino Fontana and Kristen Bell.


Pare che Kristoff sia nero nell'adattamento a musical a Broadway...
IryRapunzel
CITAZIONE (veu @ 6/9/2016, 22:37) *
Okieriete Onaodowan (Hamilton)

No vabè... Oak!! Fantastico!! Quel ragazzo è un mostro!! clapclap.gif clapclap.gif
Capitano Amelia
E un altro che ha lavorato in "Hamilton" rifluisce in Disney... Chissà se poi se ne aggiungono altri...
veu
Dal sito Hollywood Reporter:

Disney Replaces Director of Broadway-Bound 'Frozen' Musical

Tony winner Michael Grandage reportedly will now stage the eagerly anticipated project, which despite the creative shakeup remains on track to bow in August 2017.

Looks like Disney's Frozen has a new director in place.

Following the exit early last month of the project's original director, Alex Timbers, sources with knowledge of the production say lauded Brit director Michael Grandage has now signed on to stage the Broadway-bound musical, bringing his regular design collaborator, Christopher Oram, as part of the package.

Grandage won the Tony Award for best direction of a play in 2010 for John Logan's Red, and was nominated two other times, for Frost/Nixon in 2007 and for The Cripple of Inishmaan in 2014.

His experience directing musicals on Broadway has been limited to the 2012 revival of Evita, with Elena Roger and Ricky Martin. However, Grandage has staged both musicals and opera in London, notably Grand Hotel in 2004, during his tenure as artistic director of the Donmar Warehouse; and a hit West End revival of Guys and Dolls the following year, with Ewan McGregor, Jane Krakowski and Douglas Hodge. Both those shows won Olivier Awards for outstanding musical production.

After making his film directing debut this year with the period drama Genius, which starred Colin Firth, Jude Law and Nicole Kidman, Grandage also is attached to direct a screen remake of Guys and Dolls for Fox.

Disney has not confirmed Grandage's hire and declined to comment on this story, but if the deal goes through, the Frozen gig would put him into partnership with the studio's theatrical division for the first time on a massive project that is widely expected to be another stage juggernaut for the company. The show is scheduled to join stablemates The Lion King and Aladdin on Broadway in spring 2018. Released in 2013, the film version of Frozen is the top-grossing animated feature of all time, with worldwide box office of close to $1.3 billion.

Prior to Broadway, the Frozen musical will play a tryout engagement at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, beginning performances in Aug. 2017. That timeline remains in place, despite the switch in directors after it became clear that Timbers' vision for the show was not what Disney had in mind.

A change in the director and key creatives of a major Broadway musical is not uncommon; Finding Neverland opened in New York in 2015 with an entirely different creative team from the original U.K. production, while Charlie and the Chocolate Factory will open next April with director Jack O'Brien stepping in for Sam Mendes, who staged the show in London.

The stage adaptation of Frozen features music and lyrics by the creators of the film score, Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez, and a book by Jennifer Lee, who wrote and co-directed the movie. Taking the reins from previously announced designer Bob Crowley under the brewing deal, two-time Tony winner Oram would design sets and costumes for the show. Lighting is by prolific designer Natasha Katz, whose six Tonys include one for Disney's Aida, while as previously announced, Christopher Gattelli, a Tony winner for Disney's Newsies, is now on board as choreographer.

Inspired by Hans Christian Andersen's The Snow Queen, Frozen follows a princess named Anna on her journey across an icy landscape to find her estranged sister Elsa, whose dark powers have locked the kingdom in eternal winter. The movie also launched a chart-topping hit with the Oscar-winning song, "Let It Go." The show will feature that number as well as others from the movie and new songs by the husband-and-wife composing team.

It's an open secret on Broadway that Frozen will take up residence at the St. James Theatre, which is undergoing backstage renovations to accommodate the large-scale production's sets. However, like news of Grandage's involvement, which first appeared in The New York Post, plans for the Broadway venue have not been confirmed by Disney. Casting on the show also remains to be announced.

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Dal sito Playbill:

Disney’s Frozen Names Tony-Winning Director and a Broadway Theatre

Tony Award-winning director Michael Grandage and Tony-winning scenic designer Christopher Oram have joined the show’s creative team.

Award-winning director Michael Grandage and scenic designer Christopher Oram—collaborators on the Tony-winning drama Red—have joined the creative team of Disney’s next Broadway musical, Frozen.

Disney confirmed the news September 27. The announcement comes days after the New York Post reported that the pair were in final negotiations.

Disney also revealed that Frozen will arrive at Broadway’s St. James Theatre in spring 2018. The back wall of the theatre is being expanded in order to house the technically advanced production. The theatre’s current resident, Something Rotten!, will play its final performance January 1, 2017.

In August, Disney announced that it was parting ways with original Frozen director Alex Timbers (Peter and the Starcatcher, Moulin Rouge!). Added to the creative team was Christopher Gattelli, the Tony-winning choreographer of Disney’s Newsies.

Previous reports indicated that Billy Elliot director Stephen Daldry (who is also tapped to direct the film adaptation of Wicked) was in talks to take up the reins on Frozen.

The Post report stated that Daldry opted to pursue other projects, while original Frozen scenic designer Bob Crowley departed the production amicably.

Frozen will premiere at the Denver Center for the Performing Arts in August 2017 prior to its Broadway
arrival.

Casting and detailed Broadway dates are yet to be announced.
veu
Dal sito ETonline, un'intervista a Kristen Anderson Lopez:

Frozen grossed over a billion dollars worldwide at the box office. “Let It Go,” sung in the film by Idina Menzel, sold 10.9 million copies in 2014, peaked at No. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100, and earned Robert EGOT status.

Now, the animated film about Elsa and her younger sister, Anna, is being adapted for Broadway, first opening for a limited run in Denver in 2017 before heading to the St. James Theatre in New York City in the spring of 2018.

While the script is quite similar to the film, Lopez and her husband had to expand the eight songs heard on the soundtrack to 23 for the stage in nine months. “You’re at the bottom of a giant mountain that you need to climb, and that’s where we were September of 2015,” she says of having to turn those core songs into a musical by May of this year. “We said, we know we have something to say and let’s just dig deeper.”

Beyond the movie, the dresses, the backpacks and the endless assortment of promotional items that have made Frozen a billion-dollar brand, Lopez says the story “comes from a very personal, emotional place of what happens when a family is dealing with secrecy and shame and how you heal that.” As a result, they were able to go deeper with Anna’s character, in particular, and build a real romance between her and Kristoff.

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Dal sito Jim Hill Media:

And given that "Frozen," that new stage musical which is based on Walt Disney Animation Studios' Academy Award-winning film, begins its Pre-Broadway engagement at Denver's Buell Theatre on August 17th AND that a newly configured production of "The Lion King" (which will be put together by Julie Taymor & this show's Tony-winning design team and take advantage of advances in stage technologies that have been made since this show first bowed on Broadway back in November of 1997) ... It's not like Hinds & Co. will run out of material for the Official Disney on Broadway Podcast anytime soon.

veu
Dal sito Variety:

‘Frozen’ Musical Sets Casting, New Choreographer on Way to Broadway

Disney Theatrical Prods. has lined up the principal casting for its Broadway-bound musical adaptation of “Frozen,” with Caissie Levy and Patti Murin on board to play the sisters at the center of the story.

Levy (“Ghost,” “Les Miserables,” “Hair”) plays Elsa, the character who sings the animated film’s best-known tune, “Let It Go,” with Murin (“Lysistrata Jones,” “Xanadu”) on board for Anna. In the film, the characters were voiced by Idina Menzel and Kristen Bell, respectively.

Also on the cast list are Jelani Alladin as Kristoff, Greg Hildreth (“Peter and the Starcatcher”) as the snowman Olaf, John Riddle as Hans and Robert Creighton as the duke of Weselton.

Meanwhile, the production has gained a new choreographer, with Rob Ashford (“Evita,” “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”) jumping into a post that was initially filled by Peter Darling and then by Christopher Gattelli. The changeover is a symptom of the switch in creative teams precipitated when Alex Timbers, who was originally tapped to direct, exited the production and was replaced by Michael Grandage.

The cast assembled for “Frozen” represents a solid list of names that will be recognized by people in the theater industry, but won’t have much recognition among general audiences. With a title like Disney’s “Frozen,” already a huge family-audience draw thanks to mega-successful animated feature from 2013, the brand is the star attraction.

“Frozen” premieres in Denver in an out-of-town engagement set for Aug. 17-Oct. 1, prior to a Broadway run that opens in spring 2018 at the St. James Theater.


Ecco il cast:

Caissie Levy - Elsa

Patti Murin - Anna

Jelani Alladin - Kristoff

Greg Hildreth - Olaf

John Riddle - Hans

Robert Creighton - Duke of Weselton

NB: Kristoff sarà nero. Come cosa è buona, un primo eroe nero in una fiaba. Vedremo come motiveranno la cosa nel musical dato che è ambientato in Norvegia, d'accordo è una fiaba ed è di fantasia, ma sempre nel Nord è ambientato... poi magari non diranno niente, vedremo
Filippo
CITAZIONE (veu @ 17/4/2017, 22:21) *
Dal sito Variety:

‘Frozen’ Musical Sets Casting, New Choreographer on Way to Broadway

Disney Theatrical Prods. has lined up the principal casting for its Broadway-bound musical adaptation of “Frozen,” with Caissie Levy and Patti Murin on board to play the sisters at the center of the story.

Levy (“Ghost,” “Les Miserables,” “Hair”) plays Elsa, the character who sings the animated film’s best-known tune, “Let It Go,” with Murin (“Lysistrata Jones,” “Xanadu”) on board for Anna. In the film, the characters were voiced by Idina Menzel and Kristen Bell, respectively.

Also on the cast list are Jelani Alladin as Kristoff, Greg Hildreth (“Peter and the Starcatcher”) as the snowman Olaf, John Riddle as Hans and Robert Creighton as the duke of Weselton.

Meanwhile, the production has gained a new choreographer, with Rob Ashford (“Evita,” “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying”) jumping into a post that was initially filled by Peter Darling and then by Christopher Gattelli. The changeover is a symptom of the switch in creative teams precipitated when Alex Timbers, who was originally tapped to direct, exited the production and was replaced by Michael Grandage.

The cast assembled for “Frozen” represents a solid list of names that will be recognized by people in the theater industry, but won’t have much recognition among general audiences. With a title like Disney’s “Frozen,” already a huge family-audience draw thanks to mega-successful animated feature from 2013, the brand is the star attraction.

“Frozen” premieres in Denver in an out-of-town engagement set for Aug. 17-Oct. 1, prior to a Broadway run that opens in spring 2018 at the St. James Theater.


Ecco il cast:

Caissie Levy - Elsa

Patti Murin - Anna

Jelani Alladin - Kristoff

Greg Hildreth - Olaf

John Riddle - Hans

Robert Creighton - Duke of Weselton

NB: Kristoff sarà nero. Come cosa è buona, un primo eroe nero in una fiaba. Vedremo come motiveranno la cosa nel musical dato che è ambientato in Norvegia, d'accordo è una fiaba ed è di fantasia, ma sempre nel Nord è ambientato... poi magari non diranno niente, vedremo.

Solitamente a teatro non danno molta importanza all'etnia , ovviamente in base al musical , ma in questo caso non spiegheranno nulla e no non mi piace l'idea.
Arancina22
Il blind casting è pratica diffusa nel mondo del teatro statunitense e londinese di oggi, e sinceramente come pratica mi piace molto. Non vedo perché dovrebbero motivare questa scelta di un Kristoff nero se non semplicemente col talento dell'attore. wink.gif
Fulvio84
Anche a me non piace per niente.
L'ambientazione del film e' nordeuropea e il personaaggio ha un aspetto ben distinto, non capisco perche' scegliere un attore di colore.
Comunque... non amo neanche troppo le attrice per Anna e Elsa.
Capitano Amelia
Quindi Lin Manuel Miranda ha scelto pessimamente il suo cast per "Hamilton" visto che ha badato più al talento che alla verità storica... rolleyes.gif
Fulvio84
CITAZIONE (Capitano Amelia @ 20/4/2017, 17:36) *
Quindi Lin Manuel Miranda ha scelto pessimamente il suo cast per "Hamilton" visto che ha badato più al talento che alla verità storica... rolleyes.gif

Non ho idea di cosa tu stia parlando. Comunque se fosse stato nero anche nel film originale non ci sarebbe stato problema, ma siccome non lo e', questa scleta di casting a me non piace. Se a te invece piace, buon per te. Non mi pare una cosa grave.
Arancina22
Amelia, Hamilton è un discorso ancora diverso, tanto che da alcuni è stato accusato di razzismo al contrario (cosa assurda, ma tant'è...) perchè ai casting chiama espressamente attori "non bianchi". Tutto il tessuto narrativo è imperniato su questo ribaltamento d'ottica, per la quale i Padri Fondatori sono *necessariamente* non caucasici; il contrasto è voluto.
Blind casting al 100% è quello, ad esempio, di Natasha, Pierre And The Great Comet Of 1812 in cui Natasha, eroina tolstojana, a Broadway è stata interpretata da un'afroamericana mentre Off-Broadway (che io ricordi, eh) aveva un'etnia diversa.
Io in generale favorisco sempre questa pratica perché mi incuriosisce e mi emoziona molto vedere persone di diversa etnia che hanno la possibilità di "dare la loro impronta" a un personaggio, scardinando le vecchie convenzioni di "ruoli da bianchi" e "ruoli da asiatici/afroamericani/marziani"... Il teatro è un medium più libero, completamente diverso dal cinema dove invece si predilige la fedeltà etnica, perlopiù.
Poi, come dice Fulvio, ognuno ha la sua opinione smile.gif
Capitano Amelia
CITAZIONE (Arancina22 @ 20/4/2017, 18:17) *
Io in generale favorisco sempre questa pratica perché mi incuriosisce e mi emoziona molto vedere persone di diversa etnia che hanno la possibilità di "dare la loro impronta" a un personaggio, scardinando le vecchie convenzioni di "ruoli da bianchi" e "ruoli da asiatici/afroamericani/marziani"... Il teatro è un medium più libero, completamente diverso dal cinema dove invece si predilige la fedeltà etnica, perlopiù.

Ma infatti sono d'accordo con te, credo di essere incappata nella legge di Poe nel mio post precedente visto che credevo bastasse l'emoticon ad esternare il mio vero pensiero... I discorsi sul razzismo al contrario io li trovo assurdi e non capisco perchè si punti spesso il dito sull'etnia di un attore quando si tratta di musical invece di domandarsi se magari la persona in questione sia stata scelta per suo talento. Sempre attori professionisti sono...
Arancina22
Tranquilla Amelia, nessuna offesa, ci mancherebbe. smile.gif Ho capito perfettamente che siamo "sintonizzate" sull'argomento e mi fa molto piacere. happy.gif
La mia era una precisazione un po' pignola, volendo. Quando si parla di musical salto sempre su come una molla, ahimé. tongue.gif
Capitano Amelia
CITAZIONE (Arancina22 @ 20/4/2017, 19:48) *
Tranquilla Amelia, nessuna offesa, ci mancherebbe. smile.gif Ho capito perfettamente che siamo "sintonizzate" sull'argomento e mi fa molto piacere. happy.gif
La mia era una precisazione un po' pignola, volendo. Quando si parla di musical salto sempre su come una molla, ahimé. tongue.gif

E che ti confesso che mi sono sentita un pochettino come se tu avessi equivocato completamente il mio discorso e che recepissi che la mia opinione fosse campata in aria... Poi ho pure paura di essere io in realtà quella che equivoca e che recepisca uno svalutamento nei miei confronti inesistente visto che ho notato che hai capito che io ti avevo frainteso. Comunque mi fa piacere che ci siamo chiarite! hug.gif
IryRapunzel
CITAZIONE (Arancina22 @ 20/4/2017, 18:17) *
Blind casting al 100% è quello, ad esempio, di Natasha, Pierre And The Great Comet Of 1812 in cui Natasha, eroina tolstojana, a Broadway è stata interpretata da un'afroamericana mentre Off-Broadway (che io ricordi, eh) aveva un'etnia diversa.

Off-Broadway era Phillipa Soo, che poi è diventata Eliza in (appunto) Hamilton wink.gif E lei è americana con origini asiatiche.
Arancina22
CITAZIONE (IryRapunzel @ 21/4/2017, 12:41) *
Off-Broadway era Phillipa Soo, che poi è diventata Eliza in (appunto) Hamilton wink.gif E lei è americana con origini asiatiche.

Ecco, come volervasi dimostrare smile.gif
Quindi ricordavo bene. Grazie della conferma Iry!
(Ho visto Hamilton e... addio. heart.gif )
IryRapunzel
CITAZIONE (Arancina22 @ 21/4/2017, 19:14) *
(Ho visto Hamilton e... addio. heart.gif )

eheheh.gif eheheh.gif

Lo so. rolleyes.gif rolleyes.gif

(E io non l'ho neanche visto! Solo ascoltato!)
Daydreamer
Ecco il bel poster ufficiale del musical

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Il musical presenterà delle variazioni rispetto al film.
Ci sarà molta meno commedia e molto più dramma interiore delle protagoniste.
Non ci saranno né Marshmallow né i troll, questi ultimi sostituiti dagli Omini Nascosti, figure della cultura Scandinava, che sono belli e di colore verde. Canteranno in lingua norvegese.

Dal sito NY Times:

Disney’s Challenge: Keeping It ‘Frozen,’ but Still Fresh

DENVER — Yes, you will hear “Let It Go.”

Nearly an hour into the stage adaptation of Disney’s “Frozen,” Elsa, Queen of Arendelle, will embrace her fearsome power and turn the stage into a shimmering wintry landscape, at once chilly and magical. The song that launched an ocean of tributes will rev up, and, as the Act One curtain falls, audience members will race out with that impossible-to-shake lyric (“The cold never bothered me anyway”) still in their heads.

But to get there — to create a must-see musical out of the juggernaut movie that made a superstar of Idina Menzel and a belter of many a 5-year-old — has meant several years of tricky decisions, the sort that Disney has largely, but not always, mastered in turning successful movies into stage hits.

That entertainment giant has set the bar for Broadway blockbusters with “The Lion King,” which has grossed $7.9 billion globally. And “Frozen” is no ordinary property, even for Disney. The film, released in 2013, was the highest-grossing animated movie ever, and the stage musical was fast-tracked even before it reached theaters.

Despite an exceptional Broadway track record, from “Beauty and the Beast” to “Aladdin,” the company is still smarting over a pair of high-profile flops (“The Little Mermaid” and “Tarzan”) about a decade ago, and is determined to get this show right.

Along the developmental journey, a period that includes readings and rehearsals, there have been distracting disruptions indicative of the high stakes: two directors (Alex Timbers was dismissed last summer and replaced with Michael Grandage); three choreographers (now Rob Ashford); two set designers (now Christopher Oram, who is Mr. Grandage’s husband and longtime collaborator); and two Elsas (now Caissie Levy).

The show is scheduled to begin previews here on Thursday, Aug. 17 before transferring to New York next spring. Disney is unveiling to the public new songs and special effects that to this point it has held very close.

Given the title and subject of the show, one of the big questions that looms: As Elsa sings her self-affirming power ballad, how will Disney create an ice palace before our very eyes on stage? The filmmakers had close-ups and computer animation; the theatermakers must deliver a parallel punch with sets, sound, lighting and video.

Thomas Schumacher, the president of Disney Theatrical Productions and a veteran of adapting animated films for the stage, bluntly acknowledged that the fame of the song and movie’s young and fervent fan base is a mixed blessing.

“This is the first time we’ve done one of this scale with so much social media around the movie,” he said. “That means that you have seen a lot of ‘Frozen’ around you. I’m sure you could go online and find bleating goats that sing ‘Let It Go.’ Firemen. And schoolchildren.

“People know this material profoundly, and have seen lots of different interpretations,” he added. “That can be a very positive thing, or maybe not a positive. I don’t know.”

Just Enough Surprises

For Disney there is great potential. “Frozen” is expected to cost between $25 million and $30 million to develop, on the high side for Broadway but a small sum for a company that grossed about $56 billion in its last fiscal year.

But when “Frozen” was set in motion, Disney could not have known it would arrive on Broadway during an especially competitive time — directly opposite the new and acclaimed “Harry Potter” play. Another complication: “Frozen” fever is pervasive — the show has been adapted on ice, at Disney California Adventure Park and on a Disney cruise ship, and its characters and costumes are highly merchandised.

Because the “Frozen” material is so familiar, and the fans so intense, finding the right balance between replica and reinvention is complicated.

“You want to do everything they know the piece to be, and go much deeper,” said Mr. Grandage, the show’s director. “It is incumbent upon us to come up with surprises.”

That means new elements starting right at the beginning: Whereas the movie opens on a frozen lake, with a group of singing ice harvesters, the musical will start in a verdant landscape, with a group of scruffy (covered in greenery), sexy (greenery only goes so far), tailed creatures, called hidden folk, drawn from Scandinavian folklore and chanting in Norwegian.

But there will also be lots that is familiar in the show, including the basic narrative, the major characters and even some of the jokes.

“Frozen,” as die-hard fans know, is loosely (very loosely) based on “The Snow Queen,” the great 19th century Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale about the formidable power of love — more specifically, in the Andersen tale, about a young girl’s drive (abetted by a reindeer) to rescue her best friend, a boy whose heart and mind have been frozen by ice shards, from the snow-walled palace of a wintry monarch.

In the musical, as in the film, the snow queen figure Elsa is not evil but tormented — her power, which is the magical ability to create snow and ice, is also a problem, because she is unable to control it. Elsa’s struggle strains her relationship with her younger sister, Anna; that relationship between the sisters, now princesses (this is, after all, Disney) is at the heart of the story as Anna, driven by love (also aided by a reindeer), determines to save Elsa.

Still here: Olaf, the lovable snowman who naïvely fantasizes about sunbathing; Hans, a handsome prince; Kristoff, a rugged ice harvester; and Sven, the reindeer, played by the ballet-trained Andrew Pirozzi. Onstage, he wears a head-to-toe costume with prosthetic hooves attached to his hands and feet, and walks with his feet en pointe; offstage he spent days on the floor of his apartment, studying how his dog moves.

A few minor characters have been dropped: Gone is Marshmallow, the giant snow monster, as well as the pack of menacing wolves — Mr. Grandage has opted for more psychological, and less physical, drama. The trolls have been replaced with the hidden folk, making that aspect of the show less cute and more mystical; the townspeople are dressed in costumes inspired by the bunad, a traditional Norwegian folk garment, giving them a touch of authenticity.

The show’s writer, Jennifer Lee, and the married composers, Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Bobby Lopez, have spent months crafting new material. The musical, about 20 minutes longer than the film, will have about a dozen new songs, in addition to seven from the film, aiming to deepen the characters’ back stories and relationships.

Among the highlights: a new first act song for Elsa, “Dangerous to Dream,” and a new, and vocally flashy, second act number in which she grapples with the implications of having a power that she cannot control.

Patti Murin, the actress playing Anna, is one of a handful of cast members who have been with the project since the beginning; Ms. Levy auditioned for an early developmental lab, but didn’t get cast, and then was brought in as Elsa last summer.

Both women are 36, each is a “Wicked” alumna (Ms. Levy as Elphaba and Ms. Murin as Glinda) and each has previously originated roles on Broadway. But “Frozen” is a major career break for both of them.

“We know that we’ve got a big project on our hands,” Ms. Murin said.

“I knew what a massive opportunity this was, and how special it would be to be creating this character for the stage,” Ms. Levy agreed. “I never thought I’d get to be a Disney princess, that’s for sure.”

The pair will lead a company with a large cast (40 performers) and a big orchestra (22 musicians). The doors to the palace are 20 feet high. And there are 64 wigs.

One unusual, although not unprecedented, element of the “Frozen” development is that the actors and stage managers involved will share in any profits the show makes.

Profit-sharing has become an increasingly hot topic in commercial theater, particularly because of the enormous success of “Hamilton.” That show’s cast hired a lawyer to successfully press for profit-sharing when it became clear it was going to be a long-running hit, and Disney has decided that 0.5 percent of any profits from “Frozen” will go to actors and stage members represented by Actors’ Equity and hired to work on the show between the fall of 2016 and the Broadway opening.

A Sense of Familiarity

Denver has brought good — and not-so-good — luck to Disney before.

This is where the first touring company for the blockbuster “Lion King” began. It’s also where “The Little Mermaid” had its start — a show that wobbled its way through a Broadway run memorable because actors used “wheelies” onstage to convey the sensation of gliding underwater.

Crews here have experience working on a Disney scale. And the Denver Center for the Performing Arts audiences (drawn from a wide geographic area) are big enough to support a seven-week run.

The creators will be listening for the reactions of theatergoers.

“Our audiences know that the ways in which they respond to the stories onstage will be one of the considerations as to whether changes are made, or not made, and they embrace that,” said John Ekeberg, the executive director of the Denver Center’s Broadway division.

Revisions will be tucked in during the comparatively high number of days in Denver without performances. Then come three months for rewriting and redesigning before Broadway rehearsals begin in January. The show is to begin previews at an expanded St. James Theater (its rear wall is being moved back 10 feet to create more stage space) on Feb. 22, and to open on Broadway in March.

“We’re only halfway up the mountain, even though we’ve been working on this for four years,” Ms. Anderson-Lopez said. “You stand there in the back, and you listen for laughs, and you listen for the moments. And then your job after that show is how to figure out, ‘How do I get them to lean in?’ You won’t know until you watch a 5-year-old and a 95-year-old watching this musical in Denver.”

Letting It Go

Ms. Levy sat cross-legged on a red plastic chair in a Times Square rehearsal studio. It was months before Denver and she was talking about — what else? — “Let It Go” with Mr. Grandage, her director. They were dissecting the lyrics.

“We have to forget the iconography that the song has taken on, because otherwise you can’t play it,” he reminded her. “It’ll become a concert performance rather than something that is actually happening in our own narrative.”

By last Sunday, in Denver, Ms. Levy was on a purplish stage for technical rehearsal, as members of the creative team turned to the remaining requirement for the scene: the creation of that ice palace. Her regal gown was dark against the Northern Lights, as they debated what shades of blue should surround her.

“The snow glows white on the mountain tonight,” she sang, building slow and low as she tested her moves against the scenery. With each sweep of her hands, winter appeared on an abstracted mountain landscape. Glittering snow from above, and fog from below. Walls of ice, and a twinkling curtain of Swarovski crystal snowflakes.

As she transformed from self-doubting to self-accepting, there was a hiccup. A stage effect didn’t quite work, and Ms. Levy noticed. She smiled uncertainly for a moment, and then gamely powered through.

“Let it go, let it go,” she belted, her sound booming through the cavernous Buell Theater at the Denver Center, a few dozen members of the show’s crew and creative team her only audience.

She removed an unseen hairpin, causing the blonde braid coiled around her glittering tiara to cascade down her right shoulder. “The cold never bothered me anyway.”

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Prima immagine dei protagonisti in costume di scena:




Qui l'elenco delle canzoni del musical (notate che Let It Go chiuderà il primo atto ed è posizionata diversamente rispetto al film animato):

Act I

Vuelie (Company)
Anna and Elsa (Young Anna, Young Elsa, Townspeople)
A Little Bit of You (Young Elsa, Young Anna)
Do You Want to Build a Snowman? (Young Anna)
For the First Time in Forever (Anna, Elsa, Townspeople)
Hans of the Southern Isles (Hans)
Dangerous to Dream (Elsa, Townspeople)
Love Is an Open Door (Anna, Hans)
Reindeer(s) Are Better Than People (Kristoff)
What Do You Know about Love? (Anna, Kristoff)
In Summer (Olaf)
Hans of the Southern Isles (Reprise) (Hans, Wesleton, Townspeople)
Let It Go (Elsa)

Act II

Hygge (Oaken, Kristoff, Anna, Olaf, Ensemble)
For the First Time in Forever (Reprise) (Anna, Elsa)
When Everything Falls Apart (Olaf, Kristoff, Anna)
Fixer Upper (Bulda, Olaf, Hidden Folk)
Kristoff Lullaby (Kristoff)
Monster (Elsa, Hans, Volunteers)
Hans of the Southern Isles (Reprise 2) (Hans)
True Love (Anna)
Colder by the Minute (Pabbie, Anna, Kristoff, Elsa, Hans, Townspeople)
Vueille (Love Thaws) (Townspeople)
Resolution (Company)



Qui le reazioni alla prima di Denver: Click

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Alcune immagini del dietro le quinte:





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Dal sito The Wrap ecco le nuove foto tratte dal musical:

‘Frozen': First Look at Broadway-Bound Musical That Just Won’t Let It Go (Photos)


A stage version of Disney's animated hit "Frozen" opens Thursday at the Buell Theatre in the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, before an expected Broadway run starting in February 2018. Here's a first look at director Michael Grandage's new production.



The company of "Frozen" perform. The show's music and lyrics -- including new songs -- are by the movie composers Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez. The script is by the movie's director-screenwriter, Jennifer Lee.



Patti Murin (Anna) and Caissie Levy (Elsa) with Jacob Smith.



Jelani Alladin (Kristoff) and Andrew Pirozzi (Sven).



Jelani Alladin (Kristoff) and Patti Murin (Anna) meet up on an icy bridge.



Patti Murin (Anna) and John Riddle (Hans) dance to choreography by Tony winner Rob Ashford.
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Dal sito LaughingPlace:

Story Changes in the Broadway Version of “Frozen”

Disney Theatrical’s stage version of Frozen is heading to Broadway next February, but I got a chance to see the pre-Broadway engagement in Denver, Colorado, on September 23rd. The purpose of a pre-Broadway tryout is to give the creative team the chance to test out a new show in front of a real audience and they are constantly making changes to ensure that the final show enjoys a successful run amongst steep competition on the great white way. While the final show is expected to have the same cast, there could potentially be many changes along the way.

Seeing the show about a week before the end of its 7-week Denver run increases the likelihood that the version I saw will be close to the final production. One song listed on the show’s Wikipedia page called “When Everything Falls Apart” appears to have already been cut. Translating an animated film to the stage always requires some changes, but Frozen ends up being more of a literal translation.

SPOILER WARNING: If you want to walk into the show fresh, then please stop reading. Below is a list of story changes that include some spoilers.

No Trolls

Scrolling through the cast list, you will notice Timothy Hughes as Pabbie, Olivia Phillip as Bulda, and that the song “Fixer Upper” is performed by these two characters along with an ensemble of “Hidden Folk.” The Hidden Folk serve the same purpose as the trolls in the film and Pabbie even takes on a narrator role.

At the top of the show when the curtain rises, Pabbie is standing in a giant mossy cloak with a Troll headdress on his head ala The Lion King. As he removes the cloak, he reveals a chiseled bare chest and furry pants with a tail. The Hidden Folk have glowing crystal necklaces like the Trolls in the film and hide in plain sight in the mountains. All of them have dreadlock hair styles (reusing wigs from Tarzan?) and the women are modestly covered while the men bare everything from the hips up. The song “Fixer Upper” also has modified lyrics and a more primitive tempo than the film version.

The Source of Elsa’s Magic

While the show doesn’t make any profound revelations about how Elsa got her magic powers, it is revealed that her mother, Queen Iduna, is one of the Hidden Folk who left her family and married King Agnarr. When she summons her people to help cure Anna after her head gets frozen, the Hidden People seem to knowingly understand why her child was born with magic powers. Pabbie has no follow-up questions after hearing that Elsa has Hidden Folk DNA within her.

Elsa’s Anxiety Over Becoming Queen

One of the lighter changes involves Elsa revealing how anxious she is to become queen through song. In the film, it’s a quick moment where she removes her gloves and hopes her powers don’t show. In the show, Elsa opens up about it through a new tune called “Dangerous to Dream.” The theme is also repeated later in Act II.

No Marshmallow

Elsa’s giant marshmallow monster doesn’t make an appearance. After Elsa accidentally blasts Anna’s heart and her hair begins to turn white, Kristoff convinces her to leave to seek help from his friends (aka, the Hidden Folk). This is enough for the stage version of Anna to leave her sister after their emotional reunion.

Other than the Trolls becoming dreadlock mountain people, the other changes seem minor. This is largely due to the fact that both the film and show have a consistent writer in Jennifer Lee. It’s not often that the book to a Broadway show is written by the same person who penned the screenplay. As a film, Frozen felt very theatrical. Its translation to the stage feels like a very natural fit and I hope every fan gets the chance to see it, whether through a trip to New York or on the inevitable national tour.





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Dal sito Vanity Fair:

Frozen on Broadway: Inside Disney’s Latest Stage Adaptation

The extravagant reimagining of the 2013 animated film will enrich the familiar original with some poetic new ideas and “more gravitas,” according to director Michael Grandage.

For director Michael Grandage, the themes of Disney’s Frozen are Shakespearean. The story line, familiar to grade-schoolers everywhere, resembles As You Like It (albeit with a talking snowman). “Two girls are locked in a palace,” Grandage explains, “and they escape.” If the Broadway adaptation of Frozen, opening in March, repeats the spectacular success of the 2013 animated film, audiences will likewise be forever escaping into the St. James Theatre. To delight Frozen fanatics and attract new devotees, Grandage and his creative team have aimed, simultaneously, to remain true to the source material while introducing to the stage iteration “more gravitas,” he says. Layered into the fairy tale are darker motifs, derived from the liminal world of Norse mythology. The comedic rock trolls, for example, have morphed into shadowy “Hidden Folk,” inspired by the huldra, a Scandinavian forest spirit. Even Sven the reindeer, now a lifelike puppet, has become “poetic,” Grandage says. According to the director, the powerful bond between sisters Elsa and Anna—played by a luminous Caissie Levy and a winsome Patti Murin, respectively—explains why the tale resonates so deeply. And, of course, there is that mighty showstopper, “Let It Go,” the musical climax of the 19-song, two-act extravaganza. “It appeals to the underdog and to the outsider,” says Grandage. “People who need a voice have adopted it as their anthem.”




Caissie Levy as Elsa, Patti Murin as Anna, and Jelani Alladin as Kristoff, photographed in the Rocky Mountain town of Leadville, Colorado.
Photograph by Andrew Eccles.
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Abbiamo letto che il musical ha fatto il botto per ora e si sta confermando un successone
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Ecco i testi delle nuove canzoni:


MONSTER

[ELSA]
It’s finally come, come to knock down my door
I can’t hide this time like I hid before
The storm is awake, the danger is real
My time’s running out, don’t feel, don’t feel

“Fear will be our enemy
And death its consequence”
That’s what they once said to me
And it’s starting to make sense
All this pain, all this fear began because of me
Is the thing they see, the thing I have to be

A monster, were they right?
Has the dark in me finally come to light?
Am I a monster full of rage
Nowhere to go but on a rampage?
Or am I just a monster in a cage?

[HANS & MALE ENSEMBLE]
End this winter, bring back summer
Keep your guard up

[HANS]
No harm comes to her

[HANS & MALE ENSEMBLE]
End this winter, bring back summer
Keep your guard up

[ELSA]
What do I do?
No time for crying now
I’ve started this storm, gotta stop it somehow

Do I keep on running?
How far do I have to go?
And will that take the storm away
Or only make it grow

I’m making my world colder
How long can it survive?
Is everyone in danger as long as I’m alive?

Was I a monster from the start?
How did I end up with this frozen heart?
Bringing destruction to the stage
Caught in a war that I never meant to wage

Do I kill the monster?
Father, you know what’s best for me
If I die, will they be free?
Mother, what if after I’m gone
The cold gets colder and the storm rages on?

No!
I have to stay alive to fix what I’ve done
Save the world from myself
And bring back the sunIf I’m a monster then it’s true
There’s only one thing that’s left for me to do
But before I fade to white
I’ll do all I can to make things right
I cannot be a monster
I will not be a monster
Not tonight!



DANGEROUS TO DREAM

[ELSA]
I can’t be what you expect of me
And I’m trying every day with all I do
And do not say
Here on the edge of the abyss
Knowing everything in my whole life has lead to this
And so I pull inside myself
Close the walls put up my guard
I’ve practised every single day for this
So why is it so hard

‘Cause I can’t show you
I’m not as cold as I seem
There are things you cannot know
And it’s dangerous to dream

[ANNA: Sorry I’m late!]

[ELSA]
I know I’ll never see that sunny day
When this trial is finally through,
And it could just be me and you
I can’t dwell on what we’ve lost
And our secrecy and silence comes at such a cost

I wish I could tell the truth
Show you who’s behind the door
I wish you knew what all this pantomime
and pageantry was for

I have to be so cautious
And you’re so extreme
We’re different, you and I
And it’s dangerous to dream

It’s dangerous to wish
I could make choices of my own
Dangerous to even have that thought

I’m dangerous just standing here
For everyone to see
If I let go of rules
Who knows how dangerous I’d be?



I can’t believe that I’m standing here
Did I really make it through?
Father, I did it
Now I’m tied to you

I can’t stop smiling, how strange
Does this mean that things are different?
Could they really change?

And could I open up the door
And finally see you face to face
I guess the queen can change the rules
But not the reasons they’re in place

I can’t be what you expect of me
And I’m not what I seem
But I would love to know you
Is it dangerous to dream?



WHAT DO YOU KNOW ABOUT LOVE?

[ANNA, spoken]
Hans is not a stranger

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
Okay. So, what’s his last name?

[ANNA, spoken]
Of the Southern Isles!

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
That’s not a last name

[ANNA]
You’ve got opinions on my life and my relations
But let me tell you what

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
Okay. Enlighten me

[ANNA]
Love is the one thing that has zero complications
And I can trust my gut

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
Okay. You frighten me

[ANNA]
Some people know their hearts
The minute true love starts

[KRISTOFF]
Some people read a lot of books

[ANNA, spoken]
I like books!

(sung)
Some people simply know
When true love says “Hello”!

[KRISTOFF]
Some folks are taken in by curly locks and princely looks!

[ANNA, spoken]
He does have princely looks. We agree on that one!

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
Right! Ah, by the way, what color eyes does he have?

[ANNA, spoken]
Dreamy

[KRISTOFF]
All I’m sayin’ is when you go to climb a mountain
You don’t just jump to the top

[ANNA, spoken]
If it’s true love you can!

[KRISTOFF]
There’s scalin’ and scramblin’
And too many steps for countin’
And the work doesn’t stop

[ANNA, spoken]
Maybe for you

[KRISTOFF]
Love’s not an easy climb:
You have to take your time!

[ANNA]
We get a whole life, that’s the plan

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
That’s not a plan!

(sung)
Love’s not a thing you get
It’s work and tears and sweat

[ANNA]
So says a sweaty, smelly mountain man!

[ANNA & KRISTOFF]
Oh, what do you know about love?
What do you know about love?

What do you know about love?
What do you know about love?

[ANNA]
Have you even kissed a girl?
I mean, a human girl!

[KRISTOFF]
Oh

[ANNA & KRISTOFF]
What do you know about
Anything, anything?

[KRISTOFF]
Anyone with half a brain
Would have worn some winter gear!

[ANNA]
Anyone with half a life
Would have one friend who’s not a deer!

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
I do!

(sung)
Any fool who jumps headlong
Is gonna bang their head!

[ANNA]
Any fool who doesn’t jump right now
Is probably gonna end up dead!

[KRISTOFF]
Whooooooa!

[ANNA]
Like I said

(spoken)
You okay there?

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
I’ve been better…

[ANNA, spoken]
Don’t worry, I’ve got you. You should have listened to me! I know danger when I see it. Just like, I know love when I see it. Whoa!!!

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
Whoa! Whoa! Whoa! Thank you!

[ANNA, spoken]
Ah, that’s not quite how I thought we’d end up

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
You’ve got to think things through in life, and… in love

[ANNA, spoken]
Touché

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
Here. Grab on and brace yourself. Ready? Here we go!

[ANNA, spoken]
Whoa! Whoaa! Whoaaa!

(sung)
I’d like to point out that we’ve come a good long way here
And that you’re–wow–really strong!

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
I lift a lot of ice

(sung)
You saved my life just now
I guess I gotta say here
My first impression was wrong

[ANNA, spoken]
And see? You’re nice!

[KRISTOFF]
That jump was really brave

[ANNA]
Your catch was quite a save

[KRISTOFF]
You’ve got some guts!

[ANNA]
You’ve got some brains!

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
Thanks

[ANNA & KRISTOFF]
With miles and miles to go
I guess it’s nice to know
That I can trust you
Though the question still remains…
What do you know about love?

[KRISTOFF, spoken]
Just, be careful

[ANNA & KRISTOFF]
What do you know about love?

[ANNA, spoken]
Have a little faith

[ANNA & KRISTOFF]
At least we know one thing:
This trip should be interesting!

What do you know about love?
What do you know about love?



TRUE LOVE

[ANNA]
I’ve sat alone in this room before
Hours and hours on end
I know this delusional wish
The door would open to reveal a friend
I know this solitude
I know this kind of cold
But I had faith in what the stories told
Of true love
How I’d find true love

And here I am in this room again
Just as lost and small
That lonely girl with a desperate heart
Is who I am after all
There’s no escaping her
But now the dream is gone
Because I spent a lifetime
Counting on true love
True love

I was looking for a fairytale
Turns out you can’t find love
If you don’t know what it is

And now it’s clear
I’ll never leave this room
It ends as it began
With no one but myself to blame
I played my part in the plan
Dreaming got me here
And yet the dream won’t die
I can’t wish it away
No matter how hard I try
True love
True love
True love
nicolino
Da poco sono state rilasciate le canzoni, che trovo molto carine nel complesso.
A mio parere, è un po' troppo marcata l'ispirazione (chiamiamola così) che il musical ha chiaramente preso da Wicked, ma vabbé, non è la prima volta che questo accade.

Caissie Levy è pazzesca, la sua Let it go è magistrale e fa KO la versione di Idina (la quale, oltre a non piacermi in generale, non ha dimostrato di saperla cantare dal vivo senza fare disastri epocali).

Patty Murin forse non ha la bellezza e l'età di un'Anna ideale, ma vocalmente in effetti la sua voce si avvicina molto a quella di Kristen Bell. Peccato che abbiano scelto di darle un'accento che, dai commenti su YouTube di persone americane, leggo essere da "campagnola", proprio per darle un'impronta grezza ed evidenziare ancora di più la differenza tra lei ed Elsa.
Sinceramente ciò è alquanto fastidioso e specialmente nella seconda parte di For The First Time in Forever la sua voce diventa a lungo andare irritante. Ma vabbè, alla Disney odierna piacciono queste trovatine stupide per rendere le principesse "moderne" (vedi tutte le idiozie che si sono inventati per dare più carattere alla Belle della Watson) a discapito dell'elemento che poi contraddistingue una principessa stessa: la grazia (qualità che nel film Anna, seppure con la sua sbadataggine e tutti i suoi difettucci, mantiene).

Dalle Clip costumi, scenografie, luci etc. sembrano curatissimi, sinceramente spero che approdi presto a Londra per andarlo a vedere.
CostanzaM
CITAZIONE (nicolino @ 18/5/2018, 19:44) *
Peccato che abbiano scelto di darle un'accento che, dai commenti su YouTube di persone americane, leggo essere da "campagnola", proprio per darle un'impronta grezza ed evidenziare ancora di più la differenza tra lei ed Elsa.

Se è per questo, a Broadway ho visto una Belle che camminava come una camionista e una Bestia che sembrava una via di mezzo tra Fonzie e un cowboy. Molto meglio la versione italiana.
nicolino
Oddio, la Belle che cammina come una camionista posso anche immaginarla grazie ad Emma Watson, ma per la bestia Fonzie-cowboy non riesco (e non voglio) sforzarmi di capire come possa essere stato. Non ho mai visto la versione Broadway ma ho amato la versione italiana.

(EDIT) Che poi, ora che mi viene in mente, non so se possa essere stato peggio di ciò che sono stati capaci di fare per la nave da crociera Disney: un musical totalmente ispirato al live action del 2018, con tanto di attrice tutta spettinata che scimmiotta le movenze da gangster della Watson (ah, quanta personalità aggiunta a Belle!) e oggetti del castello che sono pupazzi-marionette mossi da attori. Non posto il video perché è aberrante, ma il making of si trova tranquillamente su youtube.
Daydreamer
Nicola per caso hai visto Aladdin a Londra?
nicolino
CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 24/5/2018, 20:00) *
Nicola per caso hai visto Aladdin a Londra?


Yep!
Daydreamer
Se un giorno ti va, facci sapere com'è sul topic apposito, grazie mille smile.gif
nicolino
Lo farò presto Daydreamer!

Intanto sono stati girati e messi on line i video dei numeri di For the first time in forever e Let it go.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHd8Ug4ljN4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VQVpwNV1Gms

Mentre trovo FTFTIF noioso e spento, Let it go è una bomba, una gioia per gli occhi! Caissie Levy prende le note più alte con la stessa facilità con cui si lava i denti la mattina XD
veu
Ecco le foto promozionali del musical a Broadway con la tag line "Let yourself go Frozen"






Novità:

Il musical arriva a Londra nel 2020




Qui il trailer del musical a Londra:

Click


Sito dedicato al musical a Londra:

Click


Foto di produzione con il nuovo cast del musical a Broadway:













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