Benvenuto Visitatore ( Log In | Registrati )


11 Pagine V  « < 9 10 11  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Mulan (Live Action), Walt Disney Pictures
veu
messaggio 12/1/2020, 0:19
Messaggio #241


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.459
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Uno sguardo alle bambole di Mulan:





User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
BennuzzO
messaggio 14/1/2020, 13:17
Messaggio #242


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 2.176
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 31/12/2006
Da: Lavinio Lido di Enea (RM)




La prima foto fa quasi paura!! Roftl.gif Roftl.gif
In scatola invece sembra più carina.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 15/1/2020, 0:50
Messaggio #243


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.459
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Noi troviamo bella quella bambola... conta che le foto non rendono sempre giustizia al prodotto finito, anche per via delle luci. Segue il modello di viso utilizzato dalla Hasbro per i live action, sono molto simili tra loro quelle della Hasbro.



Immagini promozionali (vedete anche la Fenice!!!):

Click


Qui altre immagini promozionali tratte dal merchandising (magliette):

Click


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 16/1/2020, 0:19
Messaggio #244


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.459
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




La regista Niki Caro parla del film, della mancanza di canzoni, di Mushu e delle sue scelte di direzione della pellicola.

Dal sito Digital Spy:

Mulan remake doesn't have any songs for a very good reason

The new version sounds like it's going to be very different.

Mulan is the latest Disney classic to get the live-action remake treatment – though it will break the tradition of recent reboots by doing away with the classic songs.

So that means we won't be singing along to 'Reflection' and 'A Girl Worth Fighting For', and it looks like there's a very good reason for it.

After all, you wouldn't start singing when facing death on a battlefield, right?

"I mean, back to the realism question – we don't tend to break into song when we go to war," director Niki Caro told Digital Spy and other press at a Mulan footage presentation.

"Not that I'm saying anything against the animation. The songs are brilliant, and if I could squeeze them in there, I would have. But we do honour the music from the animation in a very significant way.

"I guess that's the biggest thing for me about making – remaking – an iconic title like Mulan in live-action. It's the fact that it can be real, and it's the real story of a girl going to war."

Alongside the songs, the remake will not feature loveable dragon Mushu, Caro revealing why they decided to leave him out.

"I think we can all appreciate that Mushu is irreplaceable," she said.

"You know, the animated classic stands on its own in that regard. In this movie, there is a creature representative – a spiritual representation of the ancestors, and most particularly of Mulan's relationship with her father.

"But an update of Mushu? No."

Mulan will be released in cinemas on March 27, 2020.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 16/1/2020, 0:20
Messaggio #245


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.459
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Nuovo TV Spot:

When the Emperor of China issues a decree that one man per family must serve in the Imperial Army to defend the country from Northern invaders, Hua Mulan, the eldest daughter of an honored warrior, steps in to take the place of her ailing father. Masquerading as a man, Hua Jun, she is tested every step of the way and must harness her inner-strength and embrace her true potential. It is an epic journey that will transform her into an honored warrior and earn her the respect of a grateful nation…and a proud father. “Mulan” features a celebrated international cast that includes: Yifei Liu as Mulan; Donnie Yen as Commander Tung; Jason Scott Lee as Böri Khan; Yoson An as Cheng Honghui; with Gong Li as Xianniang and Jet Li as the Emperor. The film is directed by Niki Caro from a screenplay by Rick Jaffa & Amanda Silver and Elizabeth Martin & Lauren Hynek based on the narrative poem “The Ballad of Mulan.”

Fight


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 18/1/2020, 1:02
Messaggio #246


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.459
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Dal sito Variety:

Hollywood’s Go-To Asian Dad Tzi Ma Dishes on ‘Mulan’ and Oscar Snub for ‘The Farewell’

One person who was not surprised that “The Farewell” bid goodbye to any chance of an Oscar earlier this week was actor Tzi Ma, who played Awkwafina’s father in the film.

“I didn’t expect it. There were exactly zero dollars promoting the film in any way,” Ma tells Variety. “Awards are a beauty pageant. People campaign for it. The fact that we made such an audience impact is what made it so important – the recognition that we don’t have to campaign for.”

Yet while the Golden Globe-winning title was hailed as a triumph of Asian American storytelling in the U.S., it has performed disastrously in China, earning less than $1 million despite being shot by a China-born director with a predominantly Chinese cast. Its poor performance raises the question of how Chinese audiences will respond to the “Chinese-ness” of Disney’s “Mulan,” helmed by Kiwi director Niki Caro.

Ma plays the patriarch in “Mulan,” which opens March 27, and will again take on the Asian dad role alongside John Cho and Joan Chen in Alan Yang’s “Tigertail” for Netflix, also forthcoming in March.

With no fear of being typecast, he jokes that he has “already done so many different things – this is just the fun part. My list of screen daughters is powerful. I put that team on a field and we’ll win every game.”

But it remains to be seen whether Chinese actress Liu Yifei’s Mulan will be powerful enough to carry her highly anticipated blockbuster to new heights.

Ma says that whatever its outcome in the world’s second largest film market, the movie’s very existence as a blockbuster of this scale is itself “a statement.”

“It’s rare and unheard of for Disney to (put) down this kind of money for an entirely Asian cast. ‘Crazy Rich Asians’ at $30 million, no problem. But $300 million? I don’t think so.” he said. “I’m proud of this film because the powers that be gave us a lot of money to make it happen.”

He addressed some of the concerns that have arisen around accuracy and representation in “Mulan,” including the complaint that Caro is not Asian or Chinese.

“It’s really unfair – you need to see the work first before you complain about someone you know very little about,” he says. “I just hope that people will at least give the film a chance and judge it on its merits instead of all these biases.”

He himself didn’t know what to expect from Caro or the production at first, as he still hadn’t seen a script even while in talks for the part. “All the studios are doing that now, keeping everything so under wraps. It drives me crazy. This is not Pulitzer Prize-winning writing here,” he jokes.

But Caro ultimately won his confidence with the sensitivity and attention she brought to the film’s female roles, and her mostly female creative team’s attention to historical, period detail.

Yet despite such research, some of the first reactions in China to the “Mulan” trailer were of dismayed befuddlement over historical inaccuracies. This Mulan lives in a traditional “tulou” roundhouse – a visually striking structure, to be sure, but one that didn’t exist until a thousand years after the story is set, and is found only in southern, coastal Fujian province amongst the Hakka people, rather than the hero’s native north.

Ma says such choices were all in service of making the visuals pop. “I hope they can forgive us for that, because the look of it is just so gorgeous. I hope people take it in the spirit of art, rather than nitpick and complain about this or that.”

Although they picked up some second unit shots, the crew didn’t end up actually shooting in China, despite trying for a year to make it happen.

Other viewers have questioned why the “Mulan” characters speak in a Chinglish-like accent. Ma calls it “a slight intonation that hopefully gives the feel of period speech as opposed to accented speech,” explaining that it was a very deliberate decision made in order to make it seem as though the American and non-native English speaking Chinese cast all came from the same time and place.

“You’ve got to find some cohesiveness about this group of people. And it’s a period piece – we don’t want to take you out of the reality of the past,” he says.

Superstar Liu, who is perhaps more revered by mainland Chinese audiences for the classical shape of her face and features than for her acting skills, has in the past been dubbed “box office poison” by her snarkier local critics. But in Ma’s eyes, “she’s the real deal.”

Hong Kong pro-democracy protesters called for a boycott of “Mulan” after Liu posted messages to her social media platforms repeating Communist Party propaganda in support of the local police force there who have been internationally criticized for brutal tactics.

Hong Kong-born Ma doesn’t take a stance himself, but condemns the violence that has occurred on both sides. “Just because I was born in Hong Kong doesn’t mean I know Hong Kong,” he says. “What’s the end game here?”

He also pooh-poohed the monetary might of the boycott itself. “I don’t think it’s going to be impactful,” he says. “Really, what’s Hong Kong going to do? They’re going to ask who to boycott? How many people are going to sympathize with your cause?”

Meanwhile, the very personal film “Tigertail” will showcase a different kind of Asian story at a more intimate scale. Written and directed by “Master of None” co-creater Yang, it spans the 1950s to the present day to tell the story of his father’s decision to leave Taiwan and come to America.

Much of it is in Taiwanese, with the Taiwan-set parts shot on film in Yang’s actual hometown, and New York scenes shot in digital.

“It shows us a side of Alan I didn’t think he had,” Ma says.

In the film, the father character enters an arranged marriage that gives him the opportunity to come to America as a young man, leaving behind his life and a woman he actually loved in Taiwan. Years later, divorced and ready to retire, he returns with his daughter to try and reconnect with his past.

Ma is thrilled to see more Asian American stories getting their time to shine. “Why is it that when we come out we have to hit a fucking home run every time? Everyone else is afforded the time to grow, to fail and then survive,” he says.

“There are still too few stories about us. Quantity matters. We need the numbers so that all our people’s hopes and dreams aren’t just pinned on one thing.”


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 18/1/2020, 1:06
Messaggio #247


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.459
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Dal sito Bad Taste, presentazione a Milano del film alla presenza della regista Niki Caro e descrizione nell'articolo delle sequenze (attenzione! piccoli spoiler!):

Mulan: Niki Caro presenta a Milano tre scene del film, la nostra descrizione

Uscirà il 26 marzo nei cinema italiani (il 27 negli Stati Uniti) Mulan, il remake live action del classico Disney. In sviluppo da più di dieci anni, il film è stato diretto da Niki Caro, regista neozelandese che oggi si trovava a Milano per presentare le prime scene a un gruppo di esercenti e giornalisti. Noi eravamo presenti all’incontro (più avanti vi proporremo la nostra intervista) e più sotto trovate la trascrizione del panel, moderato dal nostro Francesco Alò.
Niki Caro ha presentato tre clip del film (seguite da un breve montaggio simile al trailer).

La prima è una scena molto intima tra Hua Mulan (Yifei Liu) e suo padre Hua Zhou (Tzi Ma) che si sta preparando per andare in battaglia. La ragazza osserva il padre che affila la sua spada, sulla quale sono riportati i simboli che rappresentano le parole Leale, Impavido, Sincero. L’uomo, infermo, a stento tiene in mano la spada, ma esprime comunque una grande dignità. Mulan sostiene che se fosse nata maschio, lui non sarebbe dovuto partire, ma lui la rimprovera affermando di essere felice della vita che ha avuto e che il ruolo di Mulan è quello di rendere onore al valore più importante di tutti: quello della famiglia. Alla fine della scena, però, la vediamo impugnare la spada e ci rendiamo conto che la ragazza è convinta di dover intervenire in qualche modo per evitare che il padre parta (quasi certamente senza più tornare).

La seconda scena si apre con un gruppo di un centinaio di soldati disposti in un campo, nel bel mezzo di una valle tra le montagne: si stanno allenando al combattimento, e tra essi ci sono Mulan, travestita da maschio, e Chen Honghui (Yoson An). I due non si limitano ad allenarsi: iniziano un vero e proprio combattimento, e ogni volta che Honghui si scaglia contro Mulan cercando di sopraffarla, lei risponde con mosse molto astute, fino ad arrivare a batterlo. La cosa incuriosisce tutti: in pochi si aspettavano una tale abilità da un ragazzo all’apparenza minuto e fragile come questo giovane soldato.

Nella terza scena assistiamo infine a una epica sequenza d’azione: due eserciti che si scontrano. Gli invasori partono all’attacco, guidati da Bori Khan (Jason Scott Lee), che però si separa con una piccola guarnigione e viene inseguito da Mulan e un gruppo di altri soldati che uno a uno vengono decimati dalle frecce di Khan e dei suoi. Gli ultimi sopravvissuti decidono di scappare, mentre Mulan si fa coraggio e prosegue l’inseguimento.

Niki, qual è stato il tuo apporto al film? Cosa hai sentito di poter aggiungere alla leggenda di Mulan nel mito cinese e nel mito cinematografico Disney?

La cosa che mi ha sorpreso maggiormente quando ho iniziato lavorare a questo film è che l’amatissimo cartone Disney non è la Mulan originale. La Mulan originale compare in una ballata cinese che è stata scritto nel sesto secolo. La storia è stata raccontata così tante volte da allora, generazione in generazione: ogni bambino cinese la conosce, ed è stato davvero interessante pensare a come tradurre questa storia per il pubblico del ventunesimo secolo, in live action. Ovviamente volevo rendere onore al film d’animazione, ma in primis volevo rendere onore alla ballata. E alla storia di Mulan stessa, una ragazza che si traveste da maschio. Per me è stato un privilegio poterlo fare, il mio compito è stato quello di rendere reale questo viaggio.

Abbiamo appena visto qualche scena, e mi ha colpito molto la forza della recitazione senza parole, con primi piani di attori in silenzio, soprattutto della protagonista. Tu che hai scoperto Keisha Castle-Hughes (candidata all’Oscar per La Ragazza delle Balene) come sei arrivata a Liu Yifei?

Abbiamo cercato Mulan nel mondo intero, abbiamo cercato ovunque, ogni villaggio in Cina e ogni paese del mondo. Un anno dopo non l’avevamo ancora trovata. Era davvero importante trovare quella giusta, allora abbiamo riiniziato: siamo tornati in Cina e abbiamo incontrato le attrici che inizialmente non erano state disponibili nel primo giro. Liu Yifei era una di esse. Lei è sempre stata convinta di essere nata per interpretare Mulan, e lo penso anch’io. In queste prime immagini è fantastica, ma non avete ancora visto nulla, ve lo assicuro.

La Tigre e il Dragone fu prodotto da William Kong. È un film fondamentale per gli occidentali: un ponte tra la tradizione dei film d’arti marziali e il larghissimo pubblico occidentale. Cos’ha comportato il coinvolgimento di William Kong in Mulan?

Bill è stata la prima persona con cui ho parlato di questo film. È stato il mio mentore nella realizzazione di questa pellicola, un vero padrino. Ho sempre amato La Tigre e il Dragone. L’approccio è stato però diverso in un aspetto fondamentale: avevo visto l’utilizzo della sospensione con i cavi nelle scene d’azione, ma per me era importantissimo che non li usassimo. Le scene d’azione di Mulan sono molto realistiche a livello fisico (…più o meno!), in linea con ciò che può fare il corpo di una ragazza. Posso dire che Liu Yifei è incredibile: ha fatto moltissime scene d’azione da sola, sa cavalcare, è molto abile nelle arti marziali e nell’uso della spada. È intelligentissima e… sa anche cantare!

Potremmo parlare per ore delle differenze tra il cartone animato del 1998 e il film live action del 2020. Ci sono dei cambiamenti, per tante ragioni. Vorrei chiederti di un cambiamento in particolare: non vedremo Mushu nel film del 2020…

Il film d’animazione è incredibile, amatissimo da tutti. Ma Mushu non era riproducibile fedelmente nel live action: funziona perfettamente nell’animazione e nel doppiaggio, ma il nostro modo per rispettarlo nel migliore dei modi è stato quello di lasciarlo all’animazione. Noi puntiamo a una storia più vera, intima ed epica. Apprezzo molto l’umorismo di Mushu, nel nostro film abbiamo ricreato umorismo nei rapporti “reali” di Mulan, e ovviamente nelle situazioni: anche solo per via della strana situazione di essere una donna nei panni di un uomo.

E allora che cosa sei riuscita a portare del film d’animazione nel live action?

Ci sono diverse cose, in realtà. Volevo rendere onore all’animazione in un certo numero di scene. La prima è la sequenza in cui si combinano i matrimoni, la seconda… beh, ho sempre amato la scena della valanga nell’originale, e siccome non c’era nello script iniziale ho insistito perché si rendesse omaggio a quella sequenza.

A proposito di travestimenti: secondo te una regista donna si traveste da regista “uomo” quando gira scene d’azione, o è un cliché? Hai dato sfogo a una parte di Niki Caro che non conoscevi?

Senti, penso che anche questa domanda sia “travestita”: in pratica ci si chiede come faccia una donna regista a fare un film d’azione! E la risposta, Italia, è che per me è stata la cosa più naturale del mondo. Non avevo mai girato film d’azione prima, lo adoro e mi diverte tantissimo. Nella maggior parte dei film d’azione l’approccio è “cosa sarebbe figo vedere sullo schermo?”, in questo film invece l’azione è collegata continuamente alla storia di Mulan, al suo percorso, al suo viaggio, e per questo secondo me è più credibile. E poi, posso dire che… spacca!

Cosa vorresti dire al pubblico con questo tuo film?

Sulla spada del padre di Mulan ci sono 3 caratteri: leale, impavido, sincero. La storia di Mulan ci dimostra che lei è leale e impavida, ma quando si traveste da uomo non è sincera. Quando se ne rende conto, capisce che solo mostrando la sua identità potrà dimostrarsi davvero potente e sincera. È questo il messaggio che voglio dire al mondo. Gong Li dice nel film dice che è “impossibile che una donna guidi un esercito di uomini”. È quello che ho fatto io, non travestendomi da uomo ma rimanendo donna, e mi sento davvero a mio agio come donna in questo mondo.

Come ci si sente dopo giorni, settimane e mesi di lavoro, a vedere il risultato sul grande schermo?

Quando vedi il film voglio che guardi attentamente una scena: a un certo punto durante l’addestramento militare viene assegnato un compito a tutti i giovani in addestramento, e nessuno riesce a compierlo: raggiungere la vetta della montagna portando dei secchi d’acqua. C’è una splendida inquadratura steadicam che segue Mulan riuscirci, arrivare fino in cima: questa è stata la mia sensazione.

Come mai hai scelto di dirigere questo remake?

Non faccio mai un film a meno che non sia veramente convinta di essere la persona giusta. Il mio primo film è stato La Ragazza delle Balene, secondo me ha tantissime cose in comune con questa pellicola, che è come la ragazza delle balene sotto steroidi. In quel film si riflette sulla leadership e su quali sono le qualità necessarie per essere un buon leader. È un messaggio che si riferisce anche a me: cos’è la leadership? Io guido un team di 900 persone, e il film prova che sono stata in grado essere una guerriera e avere grazia… questo progetto mi ha permesso di farlo su scala gigantesca.

Nel realizzare questo film hai dovuto avvicinarti a una cultura diversa dalla tua, quella cinese. Hai preparato te stessa e il tuo team, vista l’importanza dell’elemento culturale?

Lungo la mia carriera mi è capitato di lavorare a diversi film che non facevano parte della mia cultura. Vivo questa cosa come una grande responsabilità: io e i miei collaboratori facciamo ricerche molto approfondite perché ci sia specificità culturale. Con La Ragazza delle Balene ho imparato che più entri nel dettaglio di una cultura (quella maori, in quel caso), più vai sullo specifico culturale, più diventi universale. Nel caso della cultura cinese ho capito che l’aspetto più importante è l’assoluta devozione nei confronti della propria famiglia, cosa che penso sia importante anche per la cultura italiana.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Hiroe
messaggio 18/1/2020, 17:38
Messaggio #248


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 2.551
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 26/10/2008
Da: Pisa




Ho letto volentieri questa intervista, e mi ha incuriosita un sacco sul film. Sembra che lo spirito con cui hanno fatto il film sia comunque rispettoso del classico, sono contenta. Capisco la scelta, in questo caso, di distanziarsi un po', se davvero lo fanno epico come dice la Caro.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 21/1/2020, 15:29
Messaggio #249


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.459
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Immagini promozionali del film da un'esibizione a Pechino:

General Mulan 𝑽𝒔 Soldier Mulan

Who will win?





Immagini dalla presentazione a Pechino:

Click



Ulteriori interviste a Niki Caro (sottotitolate in italiano):

Click

Click



User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

11 Pagine V  « < 9 10 11
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 utenti stanno leggendo questa discussione (1 visitatori e 0 utenti anonimi)
0 utenti:

 

RSS Versione Lo-Fi Oggi è il: 25/1/2020, 8:15