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> Aladdin (Live-Action), Walt Disney Pictures
brigo
messaggio 13/10/2018, 12:44
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Una volta si lodava chi riusciva a fare qualcosa di nuovo e (con)vincente.

Oggi si loda chi riesce ad avvicinarsi il più possibile a cose già esistenti (e spesso già perfette così com'erano).

Boh, dove andremo a finire...

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messaggio 13/10/2018, 21:21
Messaggio #170


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CITAZIONE (brigo @ 13/10/2018, 12:44) *
Una volta si lodava chi riusciva a fare qualcosa di nuovo e (con)vincente.

Oggi si loda chi riesce ad avvicinarsi il più possibile a cose già esistenti (e spesso già perfette così com'erano).

Boh, dove andremo a finire...


Sante parole! sleep.gif Speriamo almeno ci sia la madre di Aladdin. Del genio dell' anello dubito fortemente. tongue.gif
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messaggio 6/12/2018, 0:34
Messaggio #171


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Dal CCXP 2018:






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messaggio 10/12/2018, 1:07
Messaggio #172


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Dal sito Variety:

New Songs for Disney’s Live Action ‘Aladdin’ Will Be ‘Empowering’ for Women

Disney’s new live action adaptation of “Aladdin” isn’t entirely a whole new world. Actor Mena Massoud, who plays the titular character, teased that while the 2019 movie would offer plenty of classic “Aladdin” tune revivals, two new songs would also be added to the mix.

Talking to Marc Malkin at the GQ Men of the Year party, Massoud first described what it was like to work with Will Smith, who is playing a real life genie. “It was amazing. [Will’s] one of the most generous, grounded people in the industry,” Massoud says. “I’m just so lucky, megastar that he is.”

As for the new sounds that Disney is adding to the world of Agrabah, “We’ve got all the original music in there, plus a couple of new songs,” Massoud explains. “They’re really empowering. I gotta say one is very empowering for women, I think people are going to really, really dig it. The other one is awesome as well. We got the same guys who did ‘La La Land’ and ‘The Greatest Showman,’ we’re in good hands.”

But the biggest change could simply be the fact that this cast is made of flesh and bone and not line animation. “It’s live action,” Massoud says. “So you get to look into people’s eyes and see what they’re feeling and feel connected to them. And Will’s playing the Genie so that’s a little different too.”


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messaggio 12/12/2018, 1:19
Messaggio #173


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Dal sito Stylist.co.uk Naomi Scott parla della sua Jasmine:

Aladdin’s Jasmine is set to hit our screens all over again in the new live-action remake from Disney – and she will be a little different from how fans of the original animation might remember.

Naomi Scott, who is bringing the character to life, told The Hollywood Reporter: “Being a female character is also about being a real person, and guess what? [She] can be strong and have fun, but also get it wrong and be emotional.

She’s a multidimensional woman, and she doesn’t have to just be one thing. So in this movie, you see her go on such a roller coaster, as opposed to her one goal being to fall in love or get married.”

This Jasmine also has clear political drive. “You really get in this adaptation of the movie that her heart is for her people, and her main objective is what’s best for her kingdom,” Scott said. “And you really get a sense that she has those leadership qualities within her.”

But the biggest change for Jasmine is the introduction of a female, human confidante for her in the form of new character Dalia, a handmaiden Nasim Pedrad is playing. “I never realised it, but in the animation, Jasmine is really the only female character — isn’t that crazy?” Scott said. “The Dalia character is so important to this movie because she’s the only other female character. She may be the handmaiden but they’re best friends; they’re so close because they’ve grown up together. So we wanted people to watch the movie and see Jasmine’s relationship with another woman, and be like, ‘Ah, that’s what I’m like with my girlfriend,’ or ‘We would so do that if I was in that position.’ That’s something that’s missing from the animation.”

While there will be some changes, though, one thing remains a constant: once again, the independent princess is going to sneak into Agrabah in search of adventure in a whole new world.

And, just as she did in the animated version, she will do so dressed entirely in blue.




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messaggio 20/12/2018, 1:06
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Dal sito EW:

A whole new world: First look at Guy Ritchie's live-action remake of Disney's magical classic Aladdin


A Disney musical about a street urchin who befriends a genie and falls in love with a princess isn’t a premise that comes to mind when one thinks of Guy Ritchie. The British director, 50, is known for gritty thrillers featuring robberies, explosions, and car chases, such as Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels and Snatch. But switch a car for a magic carpet, replace stolen money with a stolen lamp, throw in an underdog hero, and you can start to see why Ritchie felt reconceiving Aladdin for live-action might be in his wheelhouse when the studio approached him in 2016. “My skills and experience could add enough to make it feel fresh and worth it, but not so much so that it would wash away nostalgia,” Ritchie tells EW. He adds that because he has five children, “making a kids’ film was very appealing to me.”

And the first Aladdin proved to be much more than a kids’ movie. Disney’s flight through a fictional Middle Eastern realm, woven with wanderlust and magic and loosely inspired by the Arabian folktales in One Thousand and One Nights, ascended to the top of the 1992 box office. On the heels of 1989’s The Little Mermaid and 1991’s Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin helped cement Disney’s animation reign. With a story that captivated audiences and soaring, showstopping songs such as “A Whole New World” and “Friend Like Me,” it became one of the Mouse House’s most beloved films. When Disney began ramping up production of live-action remakes of its animated fairy tales — such as 2015’s Cinderella and 2017’s blockbuster Beauty and the Beast — Aladdin was greenlit with Ritchie at the helm.

But before he could tell the story, Ritchie had his own three wishes to fulfill.

WISH ONE: The Genie

From the get-go, Ritchie faced one big — and blue — issue. Along with the titular hero, the story is centered on a genie, a wondrous blue immortal trapped in a lamp, who grants three wishes to whoever releases him from his vessel. In the animated version, Robin Williams breathed life into the fast-talking wish-maker, turning him into the heartwarming and critically lauded comedic core of the film. Williams’ untimely death in 2014 made reimagining Genie on screen a significant burden, and one that Ritchie knew he had to crack.

“The great thing about the role of the Genie is that it’s essentially a hyperbole for who that individual actor is, so it’s a wonderful platform and tapestry for an actor to fill his boots on,” Ritchie says. So in stepped one of the funniest forces in entertainment: Will Smith.

“Whenever you’re doing things that are iconic, it’s always terrifying,” Smith tells EW with his trademark booming laugh. “The question is always: Where was there meat left on the bone? Robin didn’t leave a lot of meat on the bone with the character.”

But if Williams “infused the character with a timeless version of himself,” Smith says, then the 50-year-old actor was going to do the same. “I started to feel confident that I could deliver something that was an homage to Robin Williams but was musically different,” he says. “Just the flavor of the character would be different enough and unique enough that it would be in a different lane, versus trying to compete.” The superstar — who recorded his own version of “Friend Like Me” on the first day he met with the music team — says
 he tapped into his roster of roles from the 1990s (including Independence Day, Bad Boys, and a certain Bel-Air prince from West Philadelphia) to shape his Genie, weaving enough of a flair for fashion into the character to earn the praise of one Disney executive, who described Smith’s Genie as part Fresh Prince, part Hitch.




The final version of Will Smith’s Genie in his blue floating lamp form isn’t quite finished — the film is due in theaters on May 24, 2019 — but Ritchie gives EW a tease of what he’ll look like. “I wanted a muscular 1970s dad,” the director says. “He was big enough to feel like a force — not so muscular that he looked like he was counting his calories, but formidable enough to look like you knew when he was in the room.” When Aladdin first stumbles across the lamp in the Cave of Wonders, a big cerulean cloud whooshes out of the spout, forming into Smith’s goateed Genie, complete with a topknot. After a quick musical introduction, Smith’s swagger shines through as he asks a dumbstruck Aladdin, “You really don’t know who I am? Genie…wishes…lamp? None of that ringing a bell? Wow, that’s a first.” Ritchie explains that Smith’s Genie is more self-aware. “I like the fact that our Genie has an ego and is a little bit vain and he cares about how he’s presented because he’s been doing this for a very long time.” After all, the Fresh Prince knows how to make an entrance.

“I think it’ll stand out as unique even in the Disney world,” Smith says. “There hasn’t been a lot of that hip-hop flavor in Disney history.”

WISH TWO: The Lovers

Time was running out for Ritchie as the start of production loomed and the internet caught wind of the challenge to find his two leads: the affable, quick-thinking, optimistic dreamer Aladdin and the indomitable, independent, benevolent Princess Jasmine. Ritchie confirms that the search was long, but after hundreds of auditions over six months, the roles went to 27-year-old Canadian actor Mena Massoud, who stars on Amazon Prime Video’s Jack Ryan series, and British actress Naomi Scott, 25, known for Power Rangers and the upcoming Charlie’s Angels reboot.

Massoud jetted off to the England set to learn how to properly sing and dance, as well as perform stunts for the film such as riding a camel and scuba diving (when Aladdin gets thrown off a cliff). “The singing and dancing I had to really train and put in time for, as I’m predominantly an actor first,” Massoud says. Ritchie calls him “quite a funny lad” and says the actor quickly bonded with Smith off screen, as the duo captured the brotherly back-and forth that Aladdin and Genie share. “What was nice about Will was that the more I got to know him and the more I spent time with him, the stronger naturally our relationships became with our characters,” Massoud explains.

Scott, whose mother is of Indian descent and whose father is British, had found herself instantly drawn as a child to 1992’s dark-eyed, dark-haired, olive-skinned Jasmine. “Having a Disney princess that looked something like me, I think was really powerful,” says Scott. Stepping into the role more than 25 years later, she says she was excited to spin her own twist on a Disney princess: “Jasmine’s main objective at the beginning is to really protect her people and to do right by them. She definitely isn’t a finished article at the beginning of the movie, but she has this beautiful arc and progression, and she goes from asking for what she wants to just taking it, and displaying that she is a leader.” Scott’s Jasmine builds on the DNA of the animated iteration, who has long been celebrated for having a feminist point of view as she fought against being married off to just any prince, per the rules of Agrabah. The film has been revamped to reflect present-day ideals that make her “a more rounded character and maybe not being such a stereotype of the time,” Ritchie says. Jasmine also gets a solo song, one of the new numbers that composer Alan Menken has written (with lyrics from La La Land songwriters Benj Pasek and Justin Paul) to accompany his original tunes.

And this time, Jasmine actually has a female counterpart to bounce her ideas and dreams off of, not just her pet tiger Rajah (who will still be in the movie). Saturday Night Live alum Nasim Pedrad plays the newly created role of Dalia, Jasmine’s handmaiden and best friend, who helps Jasmine navigate the suitors attempting to win her hand (like actor Billy Magnussen in another new role, Prince Anders of Skånland). “Jasmine is so resilient and independent in this version, she’s focused on things other than which boy she’s going to end up with,” Pedrad says. “She really wants to be a leader, and Dalia really supports that but at the same time wants to make sure she doesn’t get in trouble.”

WISH THREE: The Kingdom

As Ritchie and his team considered Morocco for location shooting, they realized it might actually hinder them from creating the fictional Agrabah. “I think I was freer to pull things from where I wanted them, I didn’t just have to be Moroccan,” production designer Gemma Jackson tells EW. Jackson and her team instead built a set — about the size of two football fields — in southeast England, transforming the rain-soaked Surrey vista into a vibrant, dusty, and millennia-old bustling port city.

Finding Agrabah was the first hurdle; filling it was the second. Both Disney and Ritchie had to tackle how to update Aladdin and its cast to avoid the cultural inaccuracies and insensitivities that the 1992 animated version fell into, such as depicting the street-market sellers of Agrabah as greedy and grotesque or describing Arabia (in song lyrics) as a place “where they cut off your ear if they don’t like your face” (the song “Arabian Nights” was edited in later releases to remove this line). Massoud says the film’s ensemble does represent the diversity of the Middle Eastern and South Asian worlds, pointing out that he’s Egyptian-Canadian; Scott is Caucasian-Indian; Pedrad is Iranian-American; and actor Marwan Kenzari, who plays Jafar (the villainous Grand Vizier to the Sultan, who seeks the lamp for his own nefarious gain), is Dutch and of Tunisian descent. “We’ve covered almost every continent, which is rare these days, but I’m really proud to be in a film that represents so many visible and ethnically different cultures,” says Massoud. Ritchie says the live-action film has a “slightly broader world, a hybrid world” that would include a Middle Eastern and South Asian crowd on screen — some 500 extras of diverse backgrounds filled Agrabah.

Meanwhile, Jackson drew inspiration from Moroccan, Persian, and Turkish cultures, Victorian paintings, and Iznik ceramics to conjure the setting. Ritchie was also assisted by “an army of cultural advisers” on set, adding that the film, while steeped in this Arabian world, is what he calls “principally a human challenge rather than an ethnic one.” “The challenges that the individual has to transcend are the same for any ethnicity or culture,” Ritchie says. He adds, “I’m loathe to shine a light on culture or color or ethnicity, because I feel as though that’s shining a light on the wrong part of the stage. The question should be, how sensitive are you towards humans?”

Jackson’s evolving set was a playground for Ritchie to film musical numbers, parades, and fast, choppy chase scenes where Aladdin is pursued by the Sultan’s guards through narrow alleys and along clustered rooftops, traversing tanneries and ducking through market stalls. “It’s like Old Hollywood and what making big movies was like in the 1950s,” Ritchie says of the physical sets.

“When you think timeless Disney classic, you’re not really thinking Guy Ritchie,” Smith says. “But he brings a beautiful edge to the look and feel and imagining of Aladdin.”

Wish granted.





















Dal dietro le quinte, ecco un'immagine di Jasmine:





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Fulvio84
messaggio 20/12/2018, 16:35
Messaggio #175


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Come ho scritto anche nel gruppo facebook, personalmente trovo queste immagini interessanti.
Il look di tutti i personaggi e' azzeccato e molto simile a quelli del Musical e gli attori li trovo piu' calzanti rispetto a quelli de La bella e la bestia.
Ora dobbiamo vedere il prodotto finale come sara'!

Jasmine e' veramente bella

Messaggio modificato da Fulvio84 il 21/12/2018, 14:49


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messaggio 20/12/2018, 17:22
Messaggio #176


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Concordo. A me ispira biggrin.gif


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messaggio 27/12/2018, 22:10
Messaggio #177


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messaggio 3/1/2019, 1:11
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Notizia:

Q: Is Mena Massoud ("Aladdin") a good singer?

The DisInsider: I've heard he was.


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messaggio 13/1/2019, 19:19
Messaggio #179


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Novità:

Alan Menken parla dei live-action di La Bella e la Bestia, Aladdin e La Sirenetta.

Da Makeitbetter:

Disney Legend Alan Menken Dishes on Live-Action ‘Aladdin,’ ‘The Little Mermaid,’ and That Time Lin-Manuel Miranda Begged for His Autograph

Think of the greatest Disney films and songs in recent memory and chances are you’ll find yourself humming an Alan Menken melody for the rest of the day. From “Under the Sea” to “Be Our Guest” to “A Whole New World,” to name a few, the eight-time Oscar-winning composer and pianist (who also happens to have plenty of Grammy and Tony Awards on his shelf too), has more hits to his name than many of the most recognizable songwriters in history. We have Menken to thank for the music of The Little Mermaid, Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, Pocahontas, Hercules, Tangled, Enchanged, Newsies, and the list goes on and on.

Recently, Menken has begun bringing the story of his incredible career journey to the stage in his one-man show, “A Whole New World of Alan Menken.” In the show, Menken accompanies his own singing and storytelling on the piano, performing some of his most beloved songs and sharing the stories behind them. Ahead of his upcoming performance at Chicago’s Auditorium Theatre on March 30, I had the chance to ask Menken about everything from how he got his amazing start, to what he really thinks about all of those Disney live-action films and what it’s like to work with some of the (other) biggest names in the business, like Lin-Manuel Miranda, Guy Ritchie, Benj Pasek and Justin Paul.

Most people immediately associate you with some of the most beloved Disney songs of all time, but they might not know where your career really launched, with your collaboration with Howard Ashman, first on God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater, and then on Little Shop of Horrors. How did that come about?
Alan Menken: When Howard and I met, I was initially a composer/lyricist and I was working in the BMI Musical Theatre Workshop with a wonderful teacher named Lehmen Engel and just writing lots of shows and trying to make a name and playing in cabarets and doing the things you need to do to make a living. Howard was looking for a collaborator for God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater, which was an adaptation of the Kurt Vonnegut novel. We decided to work together and that became our first musical together.

Rosewater ran Off-Broadway but it was a little too big to run Off-Broadway. There were 14 in the cast, and yet it had an Off-Broadway sensibility. So Howard said, “OK next show we’ll make it a little more economical. I see no more than eight characters plus this puppeteer and puppet. And that of course turned out to be Little Shop of Horrors, our first hit together.

And then Howard was ultimately responsible for bringing you on board for your first work with Disney, and your collaboration was really the beginning of a hugely successful period for Disney. How did that happen?
Coming to Disney was actually our coming back together as a collaboration. Howard had a choice about who he would ask, and I was blessed that he came back to me and we embarked on The Little Mermaid.

The other part of the story is that unbeknownst to many, the AIDs crisis was robbing us of so much talent. Howard was sick at the time but was not letting anybody know.

It was an amazing time for us, working together. When we wrote Little Mermaid I did not know anything about his health situation. It was only at the Oscars for Little Mermaid that it was no longer possible for him to keep it from everyone. So I knew about it when we began working on Beauty and the Beast, which he never lived to see, and we had also begun work on Aladdin.


So there was that period of intense creativity in the midst of a lot of human drama and the creation of all those movies. And, of course, they ended up being an incredible renaissance. You don’t know you’re in the middle of history while you’re in the middle of it, but we were.

Collaboration has been so important to the music you’ve created. Is your co-writing process always the same or is each project totally different?
Some are more different than others. The first prominent collaborator after Howard was Tim Rice when he came aboard to help me finish Aladdin. That could not be more different from Howard and most of my collaborations because, number one, we had an ocean separating us most of the time. And when we didn’t we had to work in a very intensive multi-tasking process. We were working on a number of songs at the same time. Then we would separate and then come back together. And also just as a personality and as an artist, Tim and his work with Andrew Lloyd Webber is very different from the way I worked with Howard. But at the end of the day it’s still about a composer at the piano and a lyricist kind of pacing around the room.

Let’s talk about the deluge of Disney live-action remakes coming down the pipeline. Beauty and the Beast was a big hit that really delivered for audiences and creatively seemed to fall somewhere between the animated original and Broadway stage version. What’s the creative mindset for these? Is it to remain as true as possible to the original? Do you feel pressure because audiences love those originals so much?
Well, I feel a protectiveness. Animation and theater are both mediums where the writers, especially songwriters, really move into the center of the co-creative process. For a live-action movie, it is truly a director’s medium, so it’s very dependent on what the director wants.

Bill Condon [director of Disney’s live-action Beauty and the Beast] is a huge Broadway fan, so even when we didn’t fit songs from the Broadway show into the movie, he still wanted some of those themes to be reflected in the underscore. He wanted to be very close to the theater style, but he also wanted to dig deeper into the authenticity of the 18th century and of France.

You’re now working on live-action versions of Aladdin [release date: May 24, 2019] and The Little Mermaid [release date: to be announced]. How are those being approached?
Each director has their own sort of biases about how they might want to approach an adaptation. Guy Ritchie [director of upcoming live-action Aladdin, release date May 24, 2019] is not known for musicals at all.

Guy really wants to infuse much more of a contemporary pop sensibility into the storytelling and the songs of Aladdin. We’ve been doing that and that’s been a lot of fun, but you walk a line knowing that we want to stay as true as possible to what audiences already know and love and are invested in.

On Aladdin I’ve been working with Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, who’ve been my lyricists on the new songs, and I’m rewriting or updating some of the iconic songs that Howard and I wrote.


For The Little Mermaid, I’ll be collaborating with Lin-Manuel Miranda, and he, as I think people know, is a huge Little Mermaid fan. Growing up, he went to the same school as my niece in New York and my sister said, “Oh there’s this boy, Lin-Manuel Miranda—and he loves it [The Little Mermaid], and could you sign this poster for him?”

He was insanely zealous about [The Little Mermaid] and also about musical theater and you can see that in who he’s become as a writer. The passion pours out of him. His son is named Sebastian, if that gives you an indication of how much of a fan he is.

Wow, so you gave your autograph to a young, Little Mermaid-obsessed Lin-Manuel Miranda and now you’re working together on the new film? How cool—he’s so talented.
And so smart.

I think we’ll have a lot of fun writing this. We have not started yet. I believe the process will start probably within a few months. And I don’t know what the spots will be but I’m really excited about us working together on that.

I think everyone is excited about that collaboration!
Ralph Breaks the Internet: Wreck-It Ralph 2 came out recently and probably the most talked-about scene is when Vanellope [played by Sarah Silverman] has a run-in with all of the other Disney princesses. Soon after, she’s given her own princess “I Want” song, “A Place Called Slaugher Race,” which you wrote, and which, as Sarah herself said, is quite “subversive.”

It’s a little along the lines of the thing I did for Sausage Party, the Seth Rogan and Evan Goldberg film. A couple years ago I wrote the opening number for it [Menken also scored the film]. I feel like I was kind of like a piece of found art put in for comic purposes. [Laughs.]

Sarah Silverman said working with you was a dream come true for her. That must have been fun for you too to work on that song with her and with Gal [Gadot].
As soon as we got into the room together I had heard Sarah was a big Little Shop fan so I went to the piano and started playing “Somewhere That’s Green,” and she did the whole song as a perfect Audrey literally within five minutes of us meeting. And then of course we got to work on her song. We had a blast in the studio and it was a lot of fun and the success of it has been a great surprise. I’m really pleased.


One of the things that’s so special about the projects you’ve done and continue to do is the way that they bridge the generations with these new live-action films bringing things full circle for parents like me who’ve grown up on the animated films, and now we’re doing the first the animated, then live-action film and stage versions with our kids. Are you having fun doing so much revisiting? Are you eager to get some time to work on new original projects?
Yes, yes—I’m answering the second question. I’m eager to go new, and I have new, here and there. BUT, I’m also blessed that people keep wanting to go back to the old. One of my animated musicals is being adapted to the stage now. It will be announced soon, but I can’t share it yet!

It’s Mermaid coming, it’s Disenchanted which is coming along. Apparently another adaptation of Little Shop of Horrors is coming along. We’re talking about a lot of other animated [films] that I think are going to come to the screen. So yeah, there’s a lot going on.

So I guess the problem is really that you were just too good from the start—no time for anything new because everyone wants you to keep redoing the same great stuff we all know and love!
[Laughs.] I guess so. But, I get to write new songs and work with new people and that’s always a lot of fun.

I have two young boys who are big fans of your music. How about some parenting advice: You’ve said that as a child you were more interested in creating your own music than practicing the songs assigned to you by teachers. You’ve raised two daughters who are artists and performers. What advice do you have for parents who see a creative spark in their kids? How do you nurture that and help them without being overbearing?
Encourage them. Praise them when it’s appropriate. Don’t overpraise them when it’s not. Encourage them to always be doing something new. Encourage them to know how precious their talent is. And keep helping them go onto the next thing and the next thing and the next thing.

Whatever it is, you’ve got to do what you’re passionate about because you love it, and not because you want a result. And then just give them freedom to explore. Don’t try to cut to a full flowering before their time because sometimes it doesn’t happen until you’re in your 30s or 40s. Just make sure the thing they want to do all day is the thing they do.

I was passionate about music, I just hated to practice. But still, it was important that I learned basic skills. I would learn the beginning of a Beethoven sonata and I would just make up the rest of it myself.

So don’t make them stay within the lines too much…
But remind them that there are lines! They know. They’ll be a good partner with you on what they need.

Those of us in Chicago are lucky enough to get the chance to see you perform live on stage in your upcoming one-man show, “A Whole New World of Alan Menken.” What can the audience look forward to?
Basically, I talk through my life and my career and we have three screens of visuals. I pick out the songs that are inevitably the highlights of my career and they’re what people know. I play and interact with the audience and bounce up and down on the piano and knock myself out for about two hours and have fun.


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messaggio 15/1/2019, 23:48
Messaggio #180


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Nuova immagine di Jasmine:




Dal sito USA Today:

'Aladdin' (May 24)

Guy Ritchie’s musical redo is a “bigger and brighter” take on the Disney cartoon, says Naomi Scott, who herself is adding dimension to Princess Jasmine by emphasizing the strength and intelligence of the iconic character she loved growing up. Jasmine’s arc obviously involves falling for street rat Aladdin (Mena Massoud): “They’re the perfect partnership because they both need each other and teach each other.” But it’s also about “finding her voice” and wanting the best for the people of Agrabah. “She gradually finds the courage to speak out against injustice and that's kind of her objective from the start of the movie: ‘I see these people, I love them.’ ”




* Usciranno i libri tratti dal live action (speriamo che anche in Italia vengano editati, già Maleficent non l'hanno pubblicata, speriamo che Aladdin abbia i suoi libri!).

Dal sito Amazon:


Aladdin: Far From Agrabah

This stunning original novel will tell an all-new story set in the world of the new film, featuring Aladdin and Jasmine. A magic carpet ride full of adventure, suspense, and wonder written by New York Times Bestselling author Aisha Saeed, this story will be a must-read for any Aladdin fans who find themselves drawn into and enchanted by the magical world of Agrabah and beyond.



* Uscirà anche una graphic novel editata dalla Dark Horse.

Dal sito Dark Horse:

Dark Horse enters a whole new world with a Disney Aladdin (Live Action) graphic novel! Disney Aladdin (Live Action) TPB is the perfect graphic novel companion to Disney’s all new live-action film Aladdin, directed by Guy Ritchie, in theaters May 24, 2019.

Writer Corinna Bechko along with artist Pablo Vite and more bring the individuality and spirit of Aladdin and friends to the forefront in this fun-filled anthology. Travel through the vibrant city of Agrabah in four interconnected tales connected to Disney's all new live-action film. Follow a day in the lives of Aladdin, Jasmine, and Genie, and tag along on an adventure with friends Abu, Raja, and the Magic Carpet!

Disney Aladdin (Live Action) TPB goes on sale April 30, 2019, and is available for pre-order on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, TFAW, and at your local comic shop. This 72-page graphic novel anthology retails for $10.99.


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veu
messaggio 21/1/2019, 0:44
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Uscirà il libro The Art of delle edizioni Insight Editions (lo stesso che ha pubblicato quello de Il Libro della Giungla nel 2016)

The Art and Making of Aladdin by Emily Zemler (Insight Editions, 2019).

Description de l'éditeur : The Art and Making of Aladdin offers the ultimate behind-the-scenes look into the 2019 live-action adaptation of the Disney classic Aladdin. Filled with striking imagery and fascinating behind-the-scenes details, The Art and Making of Aladdin examines the creation of Disney’s latest addition to their lineup of live-action adaptations of classic animated favorites. This deluxe book features an in-depth look at never-before-seen concept art, unit photography, and other gorgeous visual details. Exclusive interviews with director Guy Ritchie, star Will Smith, and other key cast and crew members provide a unique insight into the Aladdin filmmaking experience through a beautifully designed exploration of the development of the film. The Art and Making of Aladdin is the ultimate visual treat for all fans of this Disney animated classic.



Immagine di merchandising sulla scena di "Il mondo è mio" (così vediamo il look di Aladdin come Principe Alì):




Immagine di merchandising sulla resa del Genio:



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veu
messaggio 26/1/2019, 22:59
Messaggio #182


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Potete vedere il vestito da Principe Alì di Aladdin (oltre al Genio, la confidente di Jasmine e Jasmine che è bellissima):




Jasmine in ogni immagine sembra sempre più bella


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Daydreamer
messaggio 26/1/2019, 23:53
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Anche Aladdin si difende bene.


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theprinceisonfir...
messaggio 27/1/2019, 0:22
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CITAZIONE (veu @ 26/1/2019, 23:59) *
Jasmine in ogni immagine sembra sempre più bella


Bella lo è, ma le polemiche che si solleveranno su di lei vanificheranno completamente la sua avvenenza. Infatti non è araba, e nemmeno somiglia alle donne arabe, essendo semplicemente una britannica nata da padre caucasico e madre Ugandese di origine indiana.
Avrebbero potuto francamente scegliere una attrice mediorientale, come Golshifteh Farahani.

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messaggio 27/1/2019, 14:40
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CITAZIONE (theprinceisonfire @ 26/1/2019, 23:22) *
Bella lo è, ma le polemiche che si solleveranno su di lei vanificheranno completamente la sua avvenenza. Infatti non è araba, e nemmeno somiglia alle donne arabe, essendo semplicemente una britannica nata da padre caucasico e madre Ugandese di origine indiana.
Avrebbero potuto francamente scegliere una attrice mediorientale, come Golshifteh Farahani.


Forse sbaglio ma la versione live action avrà un Agrabah diversa, una fusione di oriente e medioriente, India (come nel racconto originale de Le Mille e una Notte) e Arabia Saudita. Se così fosse, la scelta della Scott sarebbe davvero azzeccata.

Messaggio modificato da Daydreamer il 27/1/2019, 14:40


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Arancina22
messaggio 27/1/2019, 14:56
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Diciamo che la versione originale stessa, proprio per la fonte che deriva da una tradizione orale, non può dirsi certissima sull'ambientazione della fiaba...
Io ad esempio sapevo che la versione originale di Aladino fosse ambientata addirittura in Cina.


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messaggio 27/1/2019, 15:47
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CITAZIONE (Arancina22 @ 27/1/2019, 13:56) *
Diciamo che la versione originale stessa, proprio per la fonte che deriva da una tradizione orale, non può dirsi certissima sull'ambientazione della fiaba...
Io ad esempio sapevo che la versione originale di Aladino fosse ambientata addirittura in Cina.

Ops, a ben pensarci, mi sa che hai ragione tu tongue.gif


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Fulvio84
messaggio 28/1/2019, 15:14
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CITAZIONE (Arancina22 @ 27/1/2019, 13:56) *
Diciamo che la versione originale stessa, proprio per la fonte che deriva da una tradizione orale, non può dirsi certissima sull'ambientazione della fiaba...
Io ad esempio sapevo che la versione originale di Aladino fosse ambientata addirittura in Cina.


Proprio ieri mi sono messo a leggere il mio libro ALADDIN - Storia di un capolavoro e parla proprio delle fonti, citando il fatto che e' una delle storie piu' famose de Le mille e una notte e che probabilmente e' perfino postuma, cioe' inserita nella raccolta in un secondo momento. Poi racconta di come sia citata direttamente la Cina come ambientazione ma che e' intesa come simbologia di un Paese lontano e sconfinato e che non rappresenta la reale Cina, e che quindi l'ambientazione araba e' del tutto corretta (d'altronde Sultani e Visir non non sono mai esistiti in Cina)

Messaggio modificato da Fulvio84 il 29/1/2019, 10:17


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messaggio 29/1/2019, 0:57
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Sì in effetti Visir e Sultani in Cina non ci sembra ce ne siano mai stati, a meno che nelle traduzioni della fiaba si parla di principe e primo ministro al posto del sultano e del visir, ne abbiamo anche sentito parlare così e allora sarebbe giusta l'ambientazione cinese.
Bisognerebbe guardare bene.
Comunque in generale la fiaba di Aladino copre l'Oriente (dal medio all'estremo) .

Agrabah nel film in uscita quest'anno è una città multiculturale e ci sembra di aver letto che la mamma di Jasmine era di origine indiana... vedremo


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Fulvio84
messaggio 29/1/2019, 10:18
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CITAZIONE (veu @ 28/1/2019, 23:57) *
Sì in effetti Visir e Sultani in Cina non ci sembra ce ne siano mai stati, a meno che nelle traduzioni della fiaba si parla di principe e primo ministro al posto del sultano e del visir, ne abbiamo anche sentito parlare così e allora sarebbe giusta l'ambientazione cinese.
Bisognerebbe guardare bene.
Comunque in generale la fiaba di Aladino copre l'Oriente (dal medio all'estremo) .

Agrabah nel film in uscita quest'anno è una città multiculturale e ci sembra di aver letto che la mamma di Jasmine era di origine indiana... vedremo


a quanto pare nella storia originale si e' sempre parlato di sultani, ecc


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Daydreamer
messaggio 31/1/2019, 22:16
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Nuovo Banner (un poco cheap)



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Arancina22
messaggio 1/2/2019, 19:09
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Graficamente tremendo, un taglia e incolla senza pietà. ^^"


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