Benvenuto Visitatore ( Log In | Registrati )


18 Pagine V  « < 16 17 18  
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> Maleficent - Signora del Male, Walt Disney Pictures
veu
messaggio 16/1/2020, 0:13
Messaggio #409


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




parte della scenografia è reale... avevamo letto che alcune sequenze sono state girate proprio in alcuni castelli inglesi... poi il lavoro al PC c'è stato ovviamente, ma come in tutti i live action


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 16/1/2020, 21:02
Messaggio #410


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Leggete questa intervista di ieri, è interessante.

Dal sito Coming Soon:

CS Interview: Warwick Davis of Maleficent 2

ComingSoon.net got the chance to sit down with the legendary Warwick Davis, who played a pivotal role in Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, to discuss the latest Disney live-action release. He talked a lot about his character, his acting techniques, and what it’s like to work on such a huge production.

In Disney’s Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, Aurora (Elle Fanning) and Prince Phillip (Harris Dickinson) decide to marry and leave their royal nests–which doesn’t sit too well with either set of parents. Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) is cautious about Phillip’s intentions and Phillip’s mother Queen Ingrith (Michelle Pfeiffer) raises concerns about Maleficent’s influence over Aurora–the kingdoms give to dark forces at play. Maleficent is still seen as a dark and dangerous foe to humans but when unexpected allies come forward to help her, the fate of the land is in her hands as an insidiously veiled threat rises.

ComingSoon: In Maleficent you play a character called Lickspittle. What drew you to this character and how does he differ from the other characters you’ve played over the years?

WD: Well, what drew me to the project was that I really enjoyed the first movie and I thought it would be a lovely world to be part of … and the character, I mean in the script it reads really well. He has a little kind of journey through the movie — he’s got some important moments as far as the plot goes as well — and there seemed to be a nice kind of resolution for him at the end. I was excited to think that I could definitely do something with this guy. I thought his laboratory sounded really cool when it was described in the script; and also the idea that unbeknownst to him he is one of the Moor-folk but forced into doing what he’s doing to survive.

CS: You mentioned the laboratory. In the special features, you talked about the detail that went into that set, and how you felt like it was an extension of the character. Did that set change the way you approached the character?

WD: I wouldn’t say it changed the way I approached it, but it certainly informs you more. You get information from it because, for example — and you never got to see it in the movie — he’s got a little bed underneath the bench. For me it was like, wow this guy sleeps here as well! This is his world we see within these four walls. That starts to help you understand why he’s doing what he’s doing. Really, it’s a high pressured situation. If he doesn’t follow his work through he’s going to be in here until he dies or until the queen decides she has no use for him anymore. So, the environments are all very important. When I first saw the set I made myself very familiar with it. Even in the early stages of construction, I was there trying out things — using the lift and making sure it was the right height and such. The same goes for props as well, which I’ve learned over the years are just as important. On Maleficent I was given the choice — there was a table laid out full of tools and different devices and things, and they said what do you like the look of here? I would pick up something having no clue about what it does, but it would be to be really good for measuring out the powder, or whatever it is. I made a selection … and then would tell the director, ‘This is for this, and this is how I’m going to pick up this.’ I was kind of the expert in my own world, which you have to become I think for those sorts of characters.


CS: Absolutely. So, along those same lines, what’s it like to work on a big movie like this alongside Angelina Jolie, where you’ve got all those extras, and lavish costumes and makeup and all of these big sets compared to some of the smaller projects you’ve worked on?

WD: Initially, it feels quite daunting because you have hundreds of people involved, huge sets and you’re in all this makeup. Ultimately, it all boils down to the same thing — it’s all about a moment in front of a camera with a director and perhaps some other bast members, but it’s all focused in on that very small moment. However big the production is, it’s always the same outcome; it’s always about that moment in front of the camera. I’ve learned that over the years as well. And once you get down to that, then it feels very similar working on whatever production you’re working on. You mustn’t let the size of the production put the pressure on you or change the way you behave or work. It’s all the same thing. That is your moment to do what you do. Everyone else has had their moments by then — the costume department has created the costumes, the camera team has made sure there’s film in the camera, the lighting guys have set the lights — now it’s your turn to do what you do. I’ve learned that that moment is important and you’ve really got to make sure you get everything from that because otherwise you look back and go, ‘Oh no! I should’ve done that, that would’ve been better.’ You try to make sure you have all of those choices and you offer all of those choices on camera. That way you know you’ve done your bit and given them everything you’ve got. Then it’s up to them to choose what they put in the edit. It’s only through experience that you learn that. My daughter is an actress and she’ll often come back from work going, ‘Oh, I should have — I gave what I gave, but I should’ve done this!’ And I just tell her, ‘Don’t worry about it, because it won’t matter. No one will ever know what could have been there. But in the future make sure you go through every scenario before so you offer everything.’

CS: You’ve played a lot of different characters over the years. Do you prefer playing different characters, or do you enjoy adding more to a previous character?

WD: I love revisiting characters because all of the hard work is done by then. You understand how that character lives and breathes. Stepping back in is relatively easy, you’re just expanding on what you already know. I’ve done it with Weazel in Solo, going back to that character you go, ‘Ok, I know a bit about this guy.’ And doing sequels, like when we did Leprechaun 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 … each time was just re-visiting an old friend and getting to play a little more. And you can have a bit more fun because it becomes so much like second nature as well. You don’t have to think about the character so much. You just think about what he’s doing. And then he’s able to react within the moment as the character more easily. It becomes a more natural thing to do and more of a reflex action rather than an actual conscious decision. I rather like doing that — going back to something is really nice. And also, when you’re doing those kinds of characters, you know audiences have enjoyed it because that’s the reason you’re doing it again. There’s a demand for it, which is quite satisfying in and of itself.

Maleficent Mistress of Evil is now available on Blu-ray and digital download!


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 16/1/2020, 21:05
Messaggio #411


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Qui un'intervista al regista, Joachim Ronning:

Dal sito Coming Soon:

CS Interview: Joachim Rønning Director of Maleficent 2

ComingSoon.net got the chance to sit down with the director of Maleficent: Mistress of Evil Joachim Rønning (Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, Kon Tiki) to discuss the latest Disney live-action release. He touched on some inspirational acting moments from Michelle Pfeiffer, talked behind the scenes about the filming of that incredibly tense dinner scene, and the importance of relatability in a special-effects heavy film like this one.

In Disney’s Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, Aurora (Elle Fanning) and Prince Phillip (Harris Dickinson) decide to marry and leave their royal nests–which doesn’t sit too well with either set of parents. Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) is cautious about Phillip’s intentions and Phillip’s mother Queen Ingrith (Michelle Pfeiffer) raises concerns about Maleficent’s influence over Aurora–the kingdoms give to dark forces at play. Maleficent is still seen as a dark and dangerous foe to humans but when unexpected allies come forward to help her, the fate of the land is in her hands as an insidiously veiled threat rises.

ComingSoon: I was excited to see the ways that this film continues to open up the world around Maleficent with the Dark Feys and the Kingdoms. What was your entry point into this and what made you the most excited?

Joachim Rønning: It surprised me with the first film and what grabbed me the most was the emotional core of it, along with the relationship between Maleficent and Aurora. The parent and the child, in a way, and I’m a parent myself, and that was something I could really relate to. I think that going into this next installment that became the most important thing to me, was to continue their story. How it is for Maleficent to be the mother of a young woman…

CS: And to embrace the world that she comes from even though it still doesn’t accept her.

JR: Exactly. And Maleficent, as a parent would do anything for her child. She tries to change and become more human in order to make Aurora happy and then that backfires and she feels betrayed, but I think that’s the most important thing; the characters of this story and of course there’s spectacle and it’s a fairy tale, battles and all that, but it doesn’t really mean anything if you don’t relate to it.

CS: Yeah, I thought the most terrifying aspect of the film was the Queen, Ingrith, because she is so filled with fear and hatred that it surpasses her love for even her own child, and I think that speaks to a lot of stuff that’s happening today.

JR: Yeah, it was interesting developing Queen Ingrith and we don’t really look for references in today’s society but as we started developing the character I started thinking, there were definitely some resemblances going on. You know what Ingrith is doing is controlling the narrative in a way of our story and in today’s society by the push of a button and suddenly you’re on Twitter and you’re deciding and controlling the narrative and that can be used to spread fear, ignorance, divide and polarize. That’s what she’s doing, you know.

CS: Yeah and it’s present even in the dinner scene which is such an incredible piece of work, to see both Angelina and Michell at work is so great. Can you talk a bit about crafting that scene and what was most memorable? Did it really take a week to shoot?

JR: Yeah (laughing), it took about a week to film it. It’s kind of daunting going into it because it is a 10-page scene, which is 10% of the movie if you look at it in script form. At the end of the day, it was one of the best experiences on the whole shoot and almost the whole cast is there and they’re battling out and it’s all real. It’s not blue screen, it’s not green screen, there’s nothing of that. What you see is what you get, which is rare in these big movies because they’re very visual effects heavy.


CS: It’s so intimate.

JR: Yeah, and we built this huge dining hall and it was all there. I really felt that the actors loved it and I loved it.

CS: Was that scene shot early on in the process?

JR: I think it was one of the first scenes Michelle shot actually.

CS Wow, did it inform a lot of the discovery made with the characters, just being able to dive into the thick of it?

JR: Yeah, I did remember we did some different takes and we were aware that we’d be able to discover her voice as we go along, and it shows the level that Michelle Pfeiffer is on. She gave us a couple of different performances and where she wanted Queen Ingrith to be and discussed that a lot. Not every actor can do that, which is very impressive.

CS: Yes, I wanted to talk about where you pulled inspiration for the visual style. In the kingdom, I got some brushstrokes of inspiration from the original animated film, but the nest, where all the dark faes are living, was so unique aesthetically. I’d love to know more about where you pulled inspiration for those scenes.

JR: Yeah, I mean again, we’re talking years of developing the size and you’re sitting with a team of amazing production designer, you know. But what was important for me with the Dark Faes was to have them symbolize nature and have them represent different aspects of that nature. I love the idea of all these different parts of nature all in one place. Because it’s their nest of origin. The other part that was important, and that was something I developed, was the red dust bombs in the final battle. I wanted them to look like World War II where you see them over berlin where you have them (mouthing machine gun sounds) and there’s a very powerful image with the castle where red sprays over the blue sky and you almost see the Disney logo (laughter).

CS: (laughter) The logo, but dark. Speaking of things like the Disney logo, were there any fun Easter eggs that you were excited to put in? Was Michelle Pfeiffer’s fall a reference to her Catwoman fall in Batman Returns? (laughter)

JR: (Laughter) Well she did her own stunts so I’m sure… again it’s so impressive, you know. She was hanging on the wire all day and it’s not easy, you know, to be thrown around like that. But it was very important for her and I was very impressed all the way through.

CS: Cool, well thank you for taking the time and sitting down this us today.

JR: Thank you so much!


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 16/1/2020, 21:08
Messaggio #412


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Dal sito Coming Soon:

CS Interview: Ed Skrein on Playing a Dark Fairy Leader in Maleficent 2

ComingSoon.net recently sat down with Ed Skrein (Deadpool, Alita: Battle Angel) to let us in on what it was like to work within the world of Maleficent as the dark fairy, Borra. He also spoke to us about his impactful working experience with Chiwetel Ejiofor and Angelina Jolie and the importance of tackling the themes within a film of this massive scope.

In Disney’s Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, Aurora (Elle Fanning) and Prince Phillip (Harris Dickinson) decide to marry and leave their royal nests–which doesn’t sit too well with either set of parents. Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) is cautious about Phillip’s intentions and Phillip’s mother Queen Ingrith (Michelle Pfeiffer) raises concerns about Maleficent’s influence over Aurora–the kingdoms give to dark forces at play. Maleficent is still seen as a dark and dangerous foe to humans but when unexpected allies come forward to help her, the fate of the land is in her hands as an insidiously veiled threat rises.

CS: I’m really excited to talk to you. I’ve been such a fan since Game of Thrones and to see you returning to the fantasy world is super exciting. I want to know what drew you to the project and were you excited to jump in and be a dark fairy?

ES: Yeah, there was much to look forward to with this project. Such a nuanced character grappling with such interesting moral dilemmas and inner struggles, you know? I love the fact that Borra hasn’t got it worked out. We watch him in real-time deal with this moving situation, this changing situation. I’d say him, Conall (Chiwetel Ejiofor) and Maleficent for pretty much the first hour know what will happen next. Things just keep changing and we’re reacting to them. All of us just want to be left alone; we just want to be left in peace. We just want to be able to carry on our rich cultural history and for that history and culture to be respected, but to be able to live together.

I think these themes are very important. I come from a very diverse multicultural part of London. I thought it was normal, growing up, that you’d have a Muslim, a Christian, a Jew, an Atheist, and a Rastafarian, all just living together. And one day, we’d go and eat Egyptian food and the next we’re going to have Jamaican food, and the next day we’re having Greek food. And every day I’d hear a different accent and language in each house, and this was beautiful to me. This is something I celebrate, and I love. We would allow each other’s cultures to be celebrated and coexist together, you know, and it was beautiful.

The themes in Maleficent reflect this and it was an interesting proposition to be involved with this character and get into it. It’s an interesting place to go to, conceptually and intellectually, but also an interesting vessel for change in a time when we need to be having these conversations. It’s a time during the rise of nationalism and closing of borders, you know, and a time of a lack of empathy and love. It’s a time of fear for otherness and oppression, direct oppression of otherness and sometimes it feels like, even though we are making such wonderful progress in so many areas, we are still able to take steps back and it’s a worry.

Angelina Jolie is someone who has such a strong, positive moral code, that every time you speak with her you feel her passion with this project. Chiwetel and all of us would have these conversations on set, and it’s clear how passionate it was for everyone involved, for all of us to explore and dive into.

CS: Did you and Chiwetel do a lot of work on the backstory, having different schools of thought on the ways that your characters approach the human conflict?

ES: This is really interesting. Yeah, Chiwetel and I, we created our characters in isolation. We met on set for the first time on the first day. We may have met once before during a make-up test, but we didn’t discuss things conceptually. I suppose that could have gone one way or the other. Luckily, it went the right way and we just clicked, and the chemistry was incredible from the first moment. What was important to me in representing this much more lifelike representation of two brothers or two colleagues or loved ones that have different opinions, was that we clearly have this respect for each other. We clearly have this love for each other, and we certainly have a certain amount of trust for each other, but we disagree on the best way to get peace for our people. In every political struggle, you see opposing opinions on how people should deal with it.


CS: Even amongst revolutionaries.

ES: One hundred percent. Every conflict, you know, we’ve always seen that. The people have the same goal, but different ways of approaching them and I thought that was fascinating. And it was so great to explore that bond and that love, you know. All the scenes I shot without Conall, all I could think about was him. He was driving me, you know, this is my brother, the co-leader of our people. So it was a kind of profound connection. And I think that speaks to the generosity of his energy, but also to the incredible depth to his performance and his commitment to these themes.

CS: To bring it back to stuff we can talk about, what was it like to become immersed in the character through the tactile costume with the horns and wings?

ES: Yeah, it was amazing, I really enjoy going head over heels into my characters and really embrace the whole world and I embraced this guy. I didn’t put shoes on for like, three months on set. I was leading these beautifully diverse group of people and we celebrated the beauty of everyone. Everyone looked so stunning and gorgeous and it was like a carnival of beauty; the birds of paradise, we would say, is all around us. I felt such pride for my people, the dark fairy, and the duality of that is also great.

It led to me feeling so angry toward the humans and anytime I did a scene against them I was always like grrr.. hahaha. These humans, what are they doing here? And I’d be in the human world with my bare feet and I’d be like, I shouldn’t be here, I should be in the nest with my people. I really enjoyed that world and in terms of the horns and the like, it was so funny.

CS: How did it impact your performance, did it make you aware of how you moved your head while wearing the horns?

ES: Yeah, you know if I was playing a character with what I’m wearing today, the shoes and the trousers today would affect the way I stand. When I’m walking around my hotel room in a bathrobe, I walk differently than how I walk right now with these dress shoes. Everything we wear affects us physically. To have those horns to have the contact lenses, as soon as I put them in, I become more feral; it’d informed the way I moved. And fear, fear makes you move like a wounded animal and the physicality would just ooze out of every pour when I had all of this, when I had gone through this 4-and-a-half-hour process.

CS: Definitely felt lived in.

ES: It was very lived in. But this is also a testament to the work of David White and Steward Richards, my prosthetics team. They were incredible. The designs of the work meant it was comfortable. The first time we put the horns on they were shaking around on my head and it was really uncomfortable, and I was thinking, “Am I going to have to wear these for three months and fly with these?” They went in and made them lighter and in the end, they were like carbon fiber and it was just seamless. It got to the point where I wouldn’t even notice I had it on. And as I say this now, I kind of miss wearing it.

CS: You weren’t able to keep them?

ES: The horns? Nah. That would’ve been cool though. Really what we should have done; I should’ve done the press dressed up as Borra, shouldn’t I? It would’ve been a lot more difficult and a lot more of a process every morning, and I wouldn’t have been able to go get a coffee or pack of gum, but it’d be fun.

CS: These types of films seem to always inspire cosplayers, do you look forward to seeing people go all-in on dressing up as Borra or even for Halloween?

ES: Yes! Of course! That’s the most exciting thing ever for me. I’ve seen the AJAX cosplay from Deadpool and Zapan from Alita: Battle Angel. I would love to see Borra cosplay, however, it might be the most challenging of all of them so far. I think it’ll be a very difficult one to do and I can’t wait to see what people come up with. Any Borra stuff that comes out, I’m buying for my office.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 16/1/2020, 21:09
Messaggio #413


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Dal sito Coming Soon:

CS Interview: Maleficent 2’s Harris Dickinson on Playing a Disney Prince

Walt Disney Pictures provided ComingSoon.net with the chance to sit down with actor Harris Dickinson, who plays Prince Phillip in Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, who excitedly shared his favorite things about being a Disney Prince, what it was like getting to work with the film’s ensemble and how director Joachim Rønning was able to create real landscapes that made it easy for him to immerse himself in the role.


In Disney’s Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, Aurora (Elle Fanning) and Prince Phillip (Harris Dickinson) decide to marry and leave their royal nests–which doesn’t sit too well with either set of parents. Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) is cautious about Phillip’s intentions and Phillip’s mother Queen Ingrith (Michelle Pfeiffer) raises concerns about Maleficent’s influence over Aurora–the kingdoms give to dark forces at play. Maleficent is still seen as a dark and dangerous foe to humans but when unexpected allies come forward to help her, the fate of the land is in her hands as an insidiously veiled threat rises.

ComingSoon.net: The film opens with Phillip proposing to Aurora which sets in motion the inevitable meeting between their parents. Can you talk about what it was like jumping into the story and what appealed the most to you about its world?

Harris Dickinson: So many things, not only the incredible cast and people I get to work with. There are not many chances to be a Disney Prince and to have that level of regality, the costume, and the script. So many things!

CS: What I like about this Prince Phillip is that we get to see him actively participate in a different way than being the hero in the animated film. What did you like about playing a Phillip whose motivations are so rooted in his love for Aurora and supporting her aspirations?

Dickinson: It’s a good point. You know his love for Aurora is so solely that but it’s also about uniting two worlds. I think that is quite a powerful thing that he lives for and it’s going against the grain of what it means to be a prince in a kingdom and what ruling it together with Aurora would look like in a certain way. It’s an important message and it was fun and interesting to do that.

CS: There were so many sweeping scenes with you and Elle (Fanning) like the film’s opening to the quieter moments between the two characters where you could see that. Even in the dinner scene where they introduce his parents to Maleficent–which was a week-long shoot?

Dickinson: There are so many different elements to it so it took a while. That was a really good week, for me I didn’t have loads of lines in there as well soI just got to watch. I was in the scene but I had to remind myself a few times that I had to be present and had a line coming up. It was so amazing watching Angelina and Michelle sort of go head to head like that. It was so focused and so concise with everything they did so it was really impressive to watch. It was fun–Sam (Riley) kept throwing grapes at me and after the fourth day because I think he was getting a bit restless we just started having a little mini-food fight without anyone realizing–not professional!


CS: Was it great to see the performances around you while you weren’t being shot in frame?

Dickinson: Yeah definitely and everyone as well, not just those I was with. I didn’t work with Chiwetel (Ejiofor) or Ed (Skrein) very much but even seeing what those guys did and seeing what everyone around me did was a learning curve. It was a treat for me to see that and how they sculpted their performance. It was really cool?

CS: When it came to building the relationship Phillip had with his mother and father and standing up for what he wanted, did you bring any experiences to your performance to inform those moments or did you build them with your co-stars?

Dickinson: I think it wasn’t necessarily with my parents but just in life in general. I’m 23 and I’ve got to deal with certain things in my life that aren’t always pleasant and you have to learn how to have a voice. You have to learn how to stand up for yourself so I definitely related to that. It says a lot about risk as well you know. I like to think of Phillip as someone who is brave and someone who likes to push the envelope on tradition as well. It takes a lot to do that. Aurora is the real brave one.

CS: I loved how y’all operated as a team. So when Phillip decides to make a move to propose and you’ve got this gorgeous setting surrounding you, was it easy to get into the headspace of the magical moment that was unfolding?

Dickinson: That was my first scene, the proposal. I remember walking into this massive studio and they had created everything. Real grass, real trees and a real stream running through it and I just sort of thought, this is mad! I didn’t expect this level of reality. We were talking about it. None of us really had to pretend too much. It was all there and it was all credit to Patrick the set designer and Joachim the director for creating these worlds that were so meticulous and prevalent. You sort of got used to it after a while. My family came to set as well and they were like Oh my god. My nieces visited one day and they got to see a scene with me and Elle. They didn’t really care about me, they wanted to meet Elle and they loved it.

CS: As far as Disney films go, what were your favorites growing up?

Dickinson: The Lion King, The Little Mermaid. I used to work at a Youth Theater and I worked on directing a variation of Beauty and the Beast.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 18/1/2020, 13:33
Messaggio #414


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Dal sito Dutch News:

Dutch special effects make-up artist nominated for Oscar for Maleficent 2

Dutch special effects make-up artist Arjen Tuiten has been nominated for an Oscar for his work on the Angelina Jolie film Maleficent 2: Mistress of Evil.
Tuiten spent 2.5 hours a day transforming Jolie into the character of Maleficent, the central figure in the film, which has won mixed reviews from the critics since its release last October. He is one of three make-up artists in the film team who are jointly nominated for the award.
‘It is a real honour,’ Tuiten told broadcaster NOS. ‘It is the highest possible award in film, so not something to dismiss easily.’
Tuiten was also nominated for an Oscar in 2014 for his work on the drama Wonder, about a boy with a rare facial deformity. He trained in the US and worked on Dutch films, including Zwartboek, before moving into the big league.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 18/1/2020, 13:37
Messaggio #415


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Inytervista al regista Joachim Rønning:

Dal sito CBR:

For Maleficent 2's Director, Working With Jolie & Pfeiffer Was a 'Privilege'

The 2014 blockbuster Maleficent kicked off a slate of live-action remakes of Disney's animated classics with its retelling of Sleeping Beauty from the perspective of the iconic antagonist, portrayed more sympathetically by Angelina Jolie. In the 2019 sequel, Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, which arrives today on Blu-ray and DVD, the title character again confronts a threat to the magical forest realm, this time from the power-hungry Queen Ingrith, played by Michelle Pfeiffer.

Ahead of the film's home release, director Joachim Rønning spoke with CBR about joining the Disney franchise, working with stars of the caliber of Jolie and Pfeiffer.

"A huge part of the success of this franchise -- especially the first film -- is that it surprised the audience. It made audiences go 'Oh, my God, this is a great angle. This is a fun ride,'" he said. "Of course, what Angelina Jolie did also, she really captured [Maleficent] so well and created a unique character. Although we thought we knew this character from the animated movie and the stories and all that, but then Jolie was able to go in there. ... I think that was one of the most daunting things for me, going into making a continuation of that story. How can we capture that lightning in the bottle again? How can we continue to keep surprising the audience?"

To that end, Rønning decided to look further inward into the characters, even as the world around them continued to grow.

"It became very important for me to further explore the origin story of Maleficent and where she's coming from, as well as the journey of Aurora and Maleficent," he said. "Their relationship is the emotional core of the story and the most important thing for me. This is a fantastical fairy-tale with magical creatures, but that stuff's not as important to me. That's not what draws me into this. What draws me into this is the relationships between the characters in the story and the characters themselves."

Rønning ended up finding a personal connection to the narrative and the characters. "For me, I have two daughters, I am a parent," he said. "I think that story about Maleficent and Aurora and seeing their journey together, and how they develop and how Aurora is growing up into a woman and wanting to leave her mother behind... which is very natural and find her own way. For every parent, myself included, you kind of dread that day. You're not the most important person in their life anymore. And that was what really drew me into this."

That informed one of the most memorable sequences in the film: the tense dinner between the families of betrothed Aurora and Phillip. Maleficent attempts to appease her surrogate daughter's future in-laws, and even hides her horns.

"As you always do when you're trying to please a child as much as you can -- in this case, she tries to change her character, to be more human," Rønning said. "And she goes to the dinner and of course, it all backfires. At the end of the day, that's where I see myself, and the emotional core of the story."

That throughline was a key part of the story within Ingrith as well. The mother of Prince Phillip, she's eventually revealed to have dark plans for the magical beings of the world. But, as Rønning explained, "She's also a parent. It is is a story about two parents in a way, doing what they believe in, in order to protect their child. I think with Michelle Pfeiffer, it was a very interesting process with her because she's the villain of the story on one side, but on the other side she needs come across as a loving mother for her son. That needs to be plausible, too, so it was a tricky balance."

Working with two of the most famous actresses in the world, Rønning explained that, "[Pfeiffer] is so amazing, and you have that dinner scene between Maleficent and Ingrith. There are very few actors in the world that can go up against Maleficent like Michelle Pfeiffer did ... Those were fun days. As a director, it's such a privilege. It was daunting when you go in there, and these actors have been in some of your favorite movies of all time and at some point worked with some of the best directors in the world. So, of course, you stand there and pinch your arm a little bit, but at the end of the day, it's such a privilege and luxury to be working with such talent. Because that's what they are, huge talents. That's why [Jolie and Pfeiffer] are huge stars, they're amazing as actors. You put the cameras on them and start rolling, and it's like being at the movies. I sit behind my monitor and I see them coming to life right there, and you feel so lucky as a filmmaker. Those days were fun."


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 18/1/2020, 13:43
Messaggio #416


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Dal sito CBR:

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil Introduces Disney WMD (Weapons of Magical Destruction)

Warning: The following contains spoilers for Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, in theaters now

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil plays out far more like a war movie than the typical Disney film. It features multiple attacks and numerous onscreen deaths, albeit fallen characters more often turn into explosions of sparkles instead of bodies full of blood or gore.

Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) and the other magical beings aren't prepared for what awaits them though. That's because the movie introduces a dangerous and deadly new weapon that can be used against magical creatures and is capable of outright killing them with ease.

THE DUST

The Red Dust is created, ironically enough, by the captured Pixie Lickspittle (Warwick Davis) as a weapon to be used against magical creatures. It's composed of a special kind of flower that only grows out of the graves of fairies called a Tomb Bloom. The flower possesses magical properties. It's mixed with iron, which has been established in the Maleficent films to be a sort of kryptonite for fairies. The combination of the two substances is a deadly pile of dust that, if it comes into physical contact with a magical creature, it kills and reduces them to their base form. For example, a fairy is reduced to a non-sentient dandelion when it's hit with the dust.

The Red Dust was created at the behest of Queen Ingrith (Michelle Pfeiffer) in preparation for war with the magical beings of the Moors. Seeing the Moor-folk as the enemy, Ingrith spends most of the film orchestrating events to lure magical creatures to her kingdom. This includes faking a wedding to draw the citizens of the Moors into her clutches, while spurring the impulsive Borra (Ed Skrein) into leading the Dark Faerie on a desperate charge on the castle. Either way, it leads the magical beings to Ingrith and her massive stores of the Red Dust.

WAR CRIMES

Ingrith uses the dust liberally in the ensuing battles. In the process, she and her army wipe out multiple Dark Faeries with ease. Having prepared for an aerial assault, the dust is attached to arrows for the men on the battlements and loaded into catapults to fling into the sky. But the dust has also been hidden in balloons flying in the sky to "celebrate" the wedding day. When they're lit on fire, the balloons explode and send the dust all across the sky. It's a very effective strategy, killing many and forcing the remaining Dark Faeries to withdraw and scatter, leaving them open to potentially being picked off by the soldiers on the ground.

While all of this is going on, Ingrith is also basically having a war crime committed elsewhere. After locking all the magical creatures who'd come for the wedding inside the church, Ingrith's servant Gerda (Jenn Murray) makes her way towards a massive organ. It's revealed that the musical instrument is full of the dust, so as Gerda plays, the organ's pipes shoot dust into the air that lands on the assembled magical beings. It's a brutal attempt at mass murder that's made even worse because it's all being done inside a church. Gerda is only stopped by the sacrifice of the Blue Fairy who destroys the organ, but not before a number of magical beings are taken out. The villains of this Disney film openly commit genocide, and that is wild.

WHY IT'S TERRIFYING

The Red Dust is inherently a terrifying weapon, especially for Disney to introduce. So much of the studio's classic canon is predicated on the power of magic. As a result, introducing a WMD (weapon of magical destruction) is a dark direction for Maleficent: Mistress of Evil to go. It operates like the Dip from Who Framed Roger Rabbit?, giving typically impervious magical creatures a weakness that can outright kill them instead of simply hindering them.

The scariest thing about the Red Dust might be its potential for future use. Queen Ingrith survives the events of the film and her hatred for magic is not tempered at all. She could easily go to another human kingdom (many of which have been established as having gone to war previously with the Dark Faeries) and share with them the secrets of the Red Dust. Even if it is difficult to produce because of the rarity of Tomb Bloom, it could give other kingdoms their own advantage against magical beings in future battles.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 18/1/2020, 13:46
Messaggio #417


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Continua l'intervista al regista Joachim Rønning

Dal sito CBR:

Maleficent 2 Director Reflects on the 'Daunting' But Fun Third Act

Disney's Maleficent: Mistress of Evil covers a surprising amount of ground in its run time, taking on more than just the core storyline about mothers and daughters. It also includes a war between the last of the Dark Fae and the human armies serving Queen Ingrith, which leads to a massive third act battle that features every character moving with a different purpose.

Maleficent: Mistress of Evil director Joachim Rønning opened about just how much fun he had directing the fantasy epic, even when sequences like those in the third act could feel daunting.

THE DARK FAE

A large swath of the film is dedicated to Maleficent coming across the last colony of the Dark Fae, a collection of magical beings from around the world who've built their own multi-regional base atop the back of a sea leviathan. It's a massive departure from the story of the original Sleeping Beauty, giving the film a sense of originality. It also presented Rønning with the chance to be bold in his creative decisions for the Fae. Rønning explained, "I thought when we started that it would be very interesting to discover more about the origin of Maleficent herself and her background. I love origin stories, and it was one of the most fun journeys I had."

However, Rønning didn't just want to create an army of characters who looked like Maleficent. "It's her tribe," he explained, "but at the same time, I wanted it to represent nature. This is a movie, a man versus nature story in a way, the conflict between man and nature. That was important to me. So the Dark Fae in the film, they represent different biomes in nature. So you have the tundra and the desert and the forest, and they were given different designs. But there were different factions in the tribe. So over [the course of production], it was really fun designing this... as a filmmaker and as a world-creator, it doesn't get better than that."

THE FINAL BATTLE

When the film reaches the third act, it takes an entirely new direction. With the Dark Fae attacking the castle of Queen Ingrith, the film that had earlier been a more straightforward Disney fantasy, fully embraces the epic scale of its world. The set piece takes over the entire landscape, with multiple characters engaging in different aspects of the conflict. For Rønning, it "was daunting going into that because you have a thirty-page battle. And the most challenging and the most important aspect are the characters in the battle and the relationships of the characters in the battle.

"And I think by this point in the story [we're] following 12 characters.... My head was literally exploding every day. Where can I put that story? How can I round off that character arc?... And they all have to fit into this battle going on. There's something going on inside the castle, there's something happening outside the castle, there's something going on in the church, there's always something happening."

Luckily, Rønning was able to juggle all those moving pieces, helping to ensure that the film's final act kept a steady and exciting pace. "It was probably one of the proudest moments in a way was when I discovered this battle actually hangs together. And on top of that, you want to make it cool and big and... you also need to fight for your vision on top of the storyline. It also needs to be emotional. When I was unsure of what direction to go in, I always went in for the heart of the story, which was Maleficent and Aurora. I think that's always going to be some of the most complex stuff you can do as a filmmaker, including from a technical point of view."


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 31/1/2020, 23:51
Messaggio #418


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Il film ha vinto il premio "Excellence in Sci-Fi/Fantasy Film at the Costume Designers Guild Awards 2019"

Da Twitter:

Costume Designers Guild Awards @CostumeAwards:

Ellen Mirojnick, costume designer for Maleficent: Mistress of Evil, takes the Excellence in Sci-Fi/Fantasy Film award! #CDGA #CDGLocal892
@ellenmirojnick






Guardate che bellissima immagine di Aurora sposa:

Click



E qui un video con alcune ricerche grafiche dei costumi (spettacolari!):

Click


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 23/2/2020, 22:18
Messaggio #419


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Dal sito Il Mattino:

Jo McLaren, stunt coordinator sul set di Maleficent 2: «Che bello lavorare con Angelina Jolie»

La nostra intervista a Jo McLaren, stunt coordinator sul set di Maleficent - La Signora del Male, disponibile dal 12 febbraio in 4K Ultra HD, Blu-Ray e DVD. «Le scene con Angelina sono state tutte bellissime. Maleficent è un personaggio straordinario e Angelina riusciva a far sembrare ogni movimento come se non ci fosse alcuno sforzo dietro. Ma se proprio devo scegliere la mia scena preferita direi quella della battaglia».




Dal sito Revenews:

Maleficent 2, Jo McLaren: «Che fatica far volare le Creature Magiche!»

La nostra intervista a Jo McLaren, stunt coordinator sul set di Maleficent - La Signora del Male, disponibile dal 12 febbraio in 4K Ultra HD, Blu-Ray e DVD.

Dal 12 febbraio sarà disponibile nei migliori negozi fisici e online in formato 4K Ultra HD, Blu-Ray e DVD Maleficent – Signora del Male, secondo film Disney ispirato alla favola di Malefica. Tra i contenuti extra, sarà possibile scoprire in che modo gli effetti speciali hanno contribuito a rendere la pellicola ancora più realistica, soprattutto in riferimento al volo delle Creature Magiche. Noi ci siamo fatti raccontare qualcosa in più da Jo McLaren, coordinatrice degli stuntmen del film, che ha già lavorato a progetti come Cats e Overlord.

Ciao Jo, prima di tutto sono molto felice di sentirti. Come stunt coordinator di Maleficent – Signora del Male, credo che tu abbia lavorato veramente tanto. Qual è stata la parte più complicata di tutto il lavoro?

Sicuramente il fatto che volevamo far apparire il volo delle Creature Magiche – e anche i vari salti in aria che erano previsti nelle scene di volo – il più naturale possibile, ovviamente senza che si vedessero i vari fili che ogni attore aveva dietro le spalle. I movimenti dovevano sembrare reali, come se avessimo a che fare con ali vere. Questo ha richiesto un certo sforzo nella ricerca e nello sviluppo. E, oltre a ciò, devo aggiungere la difficoltà di rispettare la tabella di marcia, le varie scale di grandezza e i movimenti veloci, tenendo ovviamente sempre in conto l’importanza della sicurezza. Dovevamo fare in modo che tutto fosse corretto e sicuro.

Immaginavo che la parte del ‘volo’ fosse in effetti una delle difficoltà principali. In che modo ha cambiato il tuo solito metodo di lavoro?

Sì, abbiamo faticato molto soprattutto nelle scene di decollo e di atterraggio delle Creature Magiche. Abbiamo usato uno strumento che si chiama tuning fork, che sembra realmente una forchetta ed è molto utile soprattutto per gestire l’equilibrio degli attori. Ha veramente funzionato per il cast in termini di movimenti e li ha anche aiutati nei dialoghi.

C’è una scena che reputi sia stata particolarmente difficile da realizzare?

Senza ombra di dubbio le scene di battaglia. Ma devo dire anche che ne sono particolarmente soddisfatta. Avevamo a che fare con circa 70-80 stuntmen che dovevano appunto supportare gli attori e avevamo 20 stuntmen che dovevano invece occuparsi delle scene in volo durante le battaglie. È stato un momento particolarmente complicato e impegnativo. Soprattutto nella gestione delle dimensioni della scena.

Posso immaginare. È la scena di cui vai più fiera?

Sicuramente è stata la più complicata. Però sì, devo confessare che è anche una delle mie scene preferite, perché è stato molto emozionante girarla e poi rivederla. C’è molta azione, per cui dal punto di vista del lavoro di stuntmen c’è stato un gran da fare. Anche le scene con Angelina sono state tutte bellissime. Maleficent è un personaggio straordinario e Angelina riusciva a far sembrare ogni movimento come se non ci fosse alcuno sforzo dietro. Ma se proprio devo scegliere la mia scena preferita direi quella della battaglia.

Hai lavorato a tantissimi film, c’è qualcosa che in questi anni è cambiato nel tuo lavoro?

Beh, ovviamente c’è stato il cambiamento portato dai effetti visivi. Ed è bellissimo lavorarci perché ciò che otteniamo sono indubbiamente risultati migliori in modo naturale. Puoi creare grandissime sequenze. In questo senso, è aumentata anche la sicurezza, questo è un dato importante. Con gli effetti visivi puoi eliminare i fili. Sicuramente è complicato, ma almeno puoi realizzare scene che prima erano impossibili da girare e farle in totale sicurezza. Basta avere un green screen.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 17/3/2020, 0:02
Messaggio #420


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Ci sarà Maleficent 3?

Ecco cosa ne pensano Elle Fanning (Aurora) e il regista Joachim Ronning.

Dal sito Metro:

Will there be a ‘Maleficent 3?' Here’s what Elle Fanning and its director told us

*There are SPOILERS ahead for "Maleficent: Mistress of Evil."

So if you haven't seen the fantasy sequel yet then please don’t read ahead. Instead, go and see Angelina Jolie put in another mesmeric turn as Maleficent, before returning to see whether or not a follow-up is planned.

Come the end of "Maleficent: Mistress of Evil," Angelina Jolie’s dark fae has helped to topple Michelle Pfeiffer’s evil Queen Ingrith, leaving Elle Fanning’s Princess Aurora to marry her true love Prince Philip, played by Harris Dickinson, with the pair declaring that they’re going to bring the magical kingdom together in harmony.

While this conclusion ties the story up nicely, the fact that "Maleficent" grossed over $758.5 million upon its release in 2014 - and that Disney has found such success with adaptations of their animated classics - means the studio has almost certainly discussed potential further installments.

But does this mean that there will actually be a "Maleficent 3?"

It turns out that Fanning and Jolie have already actually discussed what might unfold in a possible third film. This is something that they dreamed about during breaks in filming on "Mistress of Evil," with Fanning recently telling Metro, “Angelina and I have come up with an entire third film. It is not necessarily Disney approved. It was like, ‘Right, Aurora is going to go and be with the dark fae. She’s got [Prince Philip] on the side.’”

Of course, audiences actually have to go and see "Mistress of Evil" for another follow-up to be greenlit. Even if it does thrive at the box office, Fanning doesn’t expect "Maleficent 3" to be made until “5 years from now,” which would be fitting as there are five years between "Maleficent" and "Mistress of Evil."

“We’d have to wait for the story to come," she adds.

If "Maleficent 3" is put in development then "Mistress of Evil" director Joachim Ronning would certainly be interested, as he responded to my question about the potential follow-up with, “I love this universe. I love these kind of movies. So we’ll just have to wait and see. It all depends on how this goes.”


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 20/3/2020, 1:18
Messaggio #421


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Qualcuno sa se questo film è uscito con Sorrisi o con Panorama?
Di solito editano sempre i live, ma questo non l'abbiamo ancora visto


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
kekkomon
messaggio 20/3/2020, 11:38
Messaggio #422


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 31.679
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 31/7/2008
Da: Torre del Greco (NA)




CITAZIONE (veu @ 20/3/2020, 0:18) *
Qualcuno sa se questo film è uscito con Sorrisi o con Panorama?
Di solito editano sempre i live, ma questo non l'abbiamo ancora visto

Si.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 20/3/2020, 23:21
Messaggio #423


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




ma quante settimane fa è uscito?
peccato, non l'abbiamo proprio visto, né è stato pubblicizzato.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Logan232
messaggio 31/3/2020, 19:41
Messaggio #424


Millennium Member
******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 1.083
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 8/10/2013
Da: Roma




Oggi ho provato una seconda visione di "Mary Poppins Returns" in lingua originale e, a parte l'aver confermato la mia impressione negativa sul film, mi sono trovato a ragionare che "Maleficent 2", al netto di un investimento produttivo e pubblicitario nettamente inferiore, ha comunque guadagnato quasi 150 milioni in più di Mary 2.

Io sono tra quelli cui il primo "Maleficent" non è piaciuto, da un punto di vista di storia, ma questo secondo capitolo, pur presentando sempre alcune cose che mi hanno fatto storcere il naso, l'ho trovato più convincente. Secondo me, alla Disney conviene che ci pensino seriamente a un terzo capitolo. E' evidente che un pubblico per questa serie c'è. Quasi 500 milioni con praticamente zero promozione e a distanza di 5 anni dal predecessore, non è roba da poco. Magari potrebbero puntare un po' meno sugli effetti speciali e giocarsi di più le scene in interni.

Messaggio modificato da Logan232 il 31/3/2020, 19:42
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Daydreamer
messaggio 31/3/2020, 20:13
Messaggio #425


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 5.457
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 9/4/2008
Da: Brescia




Ma magari ci deliziassero con un terzo capitolo conclusivo per chiudere il cerchio, oppure soltanto una cosa minore o uno spin-off su Disney+.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 31/3/2020, 23:43
Messaggio #426


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 18.873
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Logan concordiamo con te... Maleficent 2 nonostante la TOTALE assenza di pubblicità, la distanza di mezzo decennio dal primo film e la collocazione in un periodo di cinema "saturo" ha ottenuto un incasso più che considerevole se si pensa alle premesse.
Sarà meno "iconica" nella versione live action di una Mary Poppins ma ha decisamente MOLTO più seguito una Malefica che una Mary Poppins (con questo comunque a noi il sequel di Mary Poppins, pur con qualche pecca qua e là, è piaciuto). E ovviamente i costi di promozione di Maleficent 2 sono stati nettamente inferiori rispetto a quelli di Mary Poppins 2 che aveva dalla sua un periodo favorevolissimo (periodo di Natale), un battage pubblicitario non indifferente e una costellazione di flop (leggasi Lo Schiaccianoci) che non potevano competere con l'enorme successo de Il Re Leone nel 2019 unito ai vari Marvel (sia Disney sia Sony) che hanno sbancato i botteghini e il pubblico è andato a flotte al cinema.
Secondo noi potrebbero davvero pensare a un terzo capito, anche - come dice Daydreamer - per Disney + anche se la Jolie e la Fanning farebbero prodotti Disney +? La Fanning probabilmente sì (ha già detto che tornerebbe per un terzo capitolo), ma la Jolie? forse anche lei soprattutto perchè è molto legata al personaggio e al legame che ha instaurato con Elle Fanning (oltre ad aver avuto possibilità di interagire con il regista e dire la sua sulla sceneggiatura e poi c'è comunque la questione economica non di poco conto). Per un capitolo 3 metteremmo nuovamente alla regia Ronning.
un pubblico per Maleficent c'è e la Disney dovrebbe considerare questa fan base così come ha considerato quella della Bella e la Bestia per la serie tv spin off e quella di Aladdin per la serie tv spin off e per il sequel. Maleficent 3 per Disney + potrebbe chiudere il cerchio PERO' se lo facessero è imprescindibile continuare a mettere al centro della scena Malefica E Aurora, non Malefica senza Aurora alla Cacciatore e la Regina di ghiaccio (infatti il flop è sotto gli occhi di tutti), Malefica E Aurora è quello il cuore della saga di Maleficent, non esiste l'una senza l'altra, non esiste la Fata senza la Principessa , non esiste la madre senza la figlia. Ecco quello che è Maleficent. Se vogliono farlo, siamo favorevoli MA vogliamo SIA Malefica SIA Aurora (a maggior ragione che la Fanning tornerebbe per un terzo capitolo).


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
I seguenti utenti hanno apprezzato questo post:
theprinceisonfir...
messaggio 1/4/2020, 3:07
Messaggio #427


Advanced Member
****

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 456
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/9/2013




Maleficent 3 non mi sembra una buona idea, nonostante concordi sulla bontà del discreto risultato al botteghino del secondo capitolo.

Anche io credo che Malefica e Aurora siano inscindibili, e proprio per questo non riuscirei ad immaginare un'ulteriore storia che possa approfondire il rapporto fra le due. Ho avuto la sensazione netta che sia stato detto tutto ciò che c'era da dire con il secondo film.

Se però ci fosse una sceneggiatura adeguata, non mi dispiacerebbe fare ritorno ancora una volta in quel mondo fantastico, a patto che sia dato lo stesso rilievo ai costumi e alla fotografia, entrambi punti forti dell'ultimo live action.
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
I seguenti utenti hanno apprezzato questo post:
Logan232
messaggio 1/4/2020, 11:58
Messaggio #428


Millennium Member
******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 1.083
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 8/10/2013
Da: Roma




Guarda, in realtà, io ce lo vedo un ulteriore sbocco nel rapporto tra le due. E lo hanno anticipato loro con l'ultima battuta.

Il primo film é un legame materno che si crea; il secondo film é sull'uscita dal nucleo familiare (il matrimonio); il terzo lo impernierei sulla maternità di Aurora, con il loro legame testato un'ultima volta (magari qualche conseguenza della maledizione originale che rischia di nuocere al nascituro).

Su costumi e fotografia, concordo!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
I seguenti utenti hanno apprezzato questo post:

18 Pagine V  « < 16 17 18
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 utenti stanno leggendo questa discussione (1 visitatori e 0 utenti anonimi)
0 utenti:

 

RSS Versione Lo-Fi Oggi è il: 2/6/2020, 8:20