Benvenuto Visitatore ( Log In | Registrati )


22 Pagine V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > »   
Reply to this topicStart new topic
> La Sirenetta (Live Action), Walt Disney Pictures
veu
messaggio 31/8/2016, 21:54
Messaggio #49


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Che bella l'attrice indicata da Simba, sarebbe perfetta per il ruolo.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Logan232
messaggio 1/9/2016, 14:38
Messaggio #50


Top Member
*****

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 962
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 8/10/2013
Da: Roma




Eccola: http://images.lifeandstylemag.com/uploads/...h=500&w=698

La Madison sarebbe l'attrice che interpreta Biancaneve da bambina in "Once Upon a Time".
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 1/9/2016, 23:57
Messaggio #51


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




è molto bella e avrebbe anche l'età giusta per la parte.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Klauz_star
messaggio 3/9/2016, 12:53
Messaggio #52


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 2.073
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 9/11/2008
Da: italia




Non vedo l'ora di vedere in live action la trasformazione di Ariel in umana e quella di Ursula in Vanessa...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
The Little Merma...
messaggio 6/9/2016, 1:45
Messaggio #53


Top Member
*****

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 666
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 15/11/2006




CITAZIONE (Simba88 @ 27/8/2016, 21:37) *
Vi dico la mia idea per la parte di Ariel: Bailee Madison!

Ma per carità, che Dio ce ne scansi! Io non la tollero!!!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
theprinceisonfir...
messaggio 6/9/2016, 12:39
Messaggio #54


Advanced Member
****

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 295
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/9/2013




Credo proprio che sceglieranno la britannica Ellie Bamber, che si è fatta notare in questi giorni a Venezia.







1) Tutte le protagoniste dei live action Disney sulle principesse sono britanniche, fino ad ora.
2) Si tratta dell'unica attrice in circolazione naturalmente rossa e con occhi azzurri
3) Ha 19 anni, quindi l'età giusta.
4)è abbastanza sconosciuta, ma già apprezzata dalla critica.

Sono pronto a giocarmici quello che volete che, se è in grado di cantare, il che rimane una incognita, sarà lei a impersonare Ariel.

Aggiungo che ha recitato in Pride, prejudice and Zombies assieme alla cenrentola Lily James.

Vi linko questa intervista più che le foto per darvi una idea di com'è in movimento.

Ecco qui
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
I seguenti utenti hanno apprezzato questo post:
veu
messaggio 6/9/2016, 23:09
Messaggio #55


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Davvero molto bella (e anche giovane) l'attrice Ellie Bamber e in effetti è in linea perfetta con i canoni che sta cercando la Disney per le protagoniste dei suoi film live-action.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Daydreamer
messaggio 17/9/2016, 0:06
Messaggio #56


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 4.701
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 9/4/2008
Da: Brescia




La Moretz ha appena mollato la sua sirenetta alla Universal colpita da una crisi d'identità professionale (ha cancellato insieme tutti i progetti ai quali era legata). Bel colpaccio per Disney, che se lavora di gomito come col Libro della Giungla, può vincere al photofinish anche stavolta.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Klauz_star
messaggio 17/9/2016, 22:51
Messaggio #57


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 2.073
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 9/11/2008
Da: italia




Ci sarà una sirenetta in meno da quelle previste?
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Eric
messaggio 27/9/2016, 0:52
Messaggio #58


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 3.030
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 16/12/2005
Da: Genova




E che ne dite di Rose Leslie, la Ygritte del Trono di Spade? In una intervista avevo letto che le piacerebbe essere Ariel anche perchè, scherzando, suo padre si chiama Sebastian Roftl.gif



User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 12/11/2016, 22:58
Messaggio #59


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Molto bella anche lei.

Sono in tantissime le attrici che vorrebbero interpretare la Sirenetta...

Da Fool.com:

Disney's Live-Action "Little Mermaid" Remake Looks Poised to Be a Smash

Disney's animated classic "The Little Mermaid" is getting a live-action re-imagining for the big screen, and the picture has massive potential at the box office and beyond.

Disney's (NYSE:DIS) upcoming live-action remake of its animated classic The Little Mermaid doesn't have a publicly announced release date yet, but the picture looks primed to deliver a massive box-office performance when it swims into theaters.

With great source material and Disney's recent track record of success in delivering updated takes on old hits, the picture has a strong chance of passing $1 billion in global ticket sales and creating ripple effects that benefit the company's theme-park and consumer-goods segments.

And with the writer and star of Broadway sensation Hamilton on board to craft the picture's tunes, the project has another element working in its favor: the power of song.

Disney's famous mermaid resurfaces
Released in 1989, The Little Mermaid stands as one of Disney's most loved and enduring films. It grossed $211 million worldwide. It might also be one of the Disney films best-suited for a modern revival. With a recent string of female-powered hits and the strength of Disney's Princess brand, the return of Ariel and friends to the silver screen looks to ride nostalgia and favorable audience trends to event movie status. The picture's underwater settings could also make for great visuals and set the stage for strong 3D ticket performance.

Thus far, the company's live-action reimaginings of past classics have a stellar quality and commercial track record. The 2011 release Alice in Wonderland did more than $1 billion in global ticket sales, 2014's Maleficent grossed nearly $760 million and earned an upcoming sequel, last year's Cinderella managed $544 million in ticket sales, and this year's The Jungle Book recorded $966 million at the box office and spurred a sequel into development. Alice Though the Looking Glass stands as the only real underperformer in Disney's recent installments in classic franchises, but the film will probably be a rare misfire among a mostly successful line of series revivals.

The company's slate is packed with likely winners, and The Little Mermaid looks primed to be a standout.

Disney taps Broadway's biggest star
Lin-Manuel Miranda's Broadway smash Hamilton is the biggest show to hit the stage in decades, and The House of Mouse has brought the songwriter and actor on board for its revivals of The Little Mermaid and Mary Poppins. Ariel's voice and love of song were central to the plot of the original Little Mermaid, and the upcoming remake looks to be the first of Disney's live-action reimaginings of its animated properties to make song a central part of its appeal. While it's too early to say with certainty how the project will turn out, having Miranda on board is a promising sign.

A popular song can have a major impact on a film's success. Sony's last two James Bond films benefited from having hit songs that played on radio airwaves, spurred downloads, and streamed hundreds of millions of times -- creating promotional effects for their respective films and generating money as stand-alones. However, Disney's megahit Frozen presents the best recent example of a song powering a film and taking on a life of its own.

Let It Go, Frozen's most popular tune, helped the film achieve iconic status and over $1.2 billion in global ticket sales. For months following the movie's release, Let It Go was nearly inescapable, and the song helped make the single and the film's collected soundtrack top sales chart performers. The soundtrack managed to hang in the Billboard Top 10 for 39 consecutive weeks and became the top-selling album of 2014. Frozen and Let It Go are now staples at Disney parks and cruise ships and point to value in a return to the company's musical roots. The House of Mouse has a catalog of great songs that are an integral part of its history, and the upcoming Little Mermaid remake stands a good chance of adding to that legacy.

Disney's upcoming remakes will have impacts beyond the box office
In addition to its upcoming Little Mermaid, Disney is also set to introduce new versions of past animated classics, with Beauty and the Beast bowing on March 17, Mulan releasing Nov. 2, 2018,, and The Lion King and Aladdin in production for currently unspecified dates. All of these projects have built-in box office draw, as well as the potential to boost other segments at the company.

Studio entertainment accounted for just 18% of Disney's revenues in its last three quarters, but its movie releases help shape the performance of its other businesses, particularly by driving foot traffic at its theme parks and resorts and boosting merchandise sales. Disney's characters are the glue that ties its theatrical, theme-park, and consumer-products divisions together, and the company is on a major winning streak when it comes to creating new characters and reintroducing existing favorites.

Disney's media-networks segment, which accounted for roughly 42% of revenue in the company's last three reported quarters, is struggling amid changes to the subscription-based TV landscape. ESPN, its marquee network, looks to be especially hard hit, and the company will probably have to lean on its other segments to drive overall growth going forward.

With those challenges at hand, reintroducing successful properties such as The Little Mermaid has become increasingly important for the company. Luckily for Disney and its investors, it has a very strong array of franchises to work with and stands a good chance of scoring big hits with its slate of updated takes on animated classics that create spillover effects from the box office to its other segments.

Forget the 2016 Election and find out why Walt Disney is one of the 10 best stocks to buy now
Donald Trump is the new president, and you’re naturally wondering how best to protect your portfolio and profit in the process. Well, Motley Fool co-founders Tom and David Gardner have spent more than a decade beating the market. (In fact, the newsletter they run, Motley Fool Stock Advisor, has nearly tripled the market!*)

With their record of winning in up and down markets, David and Tom know how to invest profitably no matter who occupies the White House.

Tom and David just revealed their ten top stock picks for investors to buy right now. Walt Disney is on the list - but there are nine others you may be overlooking.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 15/11/2016, 20:01
Messaggio #60


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Da EW:

Lin-Manuel Miranda gives update on Disney’s live-action Little Mermaid

The 'Hamilton' creator also teases another Disney animated project with 'Zootopia' co-director

It’s no secret that Lin-Manuel Miranda is a big, big fan of Disney’s The Little Mermaid. (The Hamilton star and creator even named his son Sebastian partly because of the 1989 film.) So, it came as no surprise when Disney tapped Miranda and original composer Alan Menken to work on the studio’s upcoming live-action Little Mermaid movie.

Now, as Miranda is busy doing press for the upcoming Moana — his first Disney movie — he gave a little update on the status of The Little Mermaid.

“We’re in super-early talks — I literally don’t have a title for what my job on The Little Mermaid is yet,” Miranda told Vulture. “Right now, it’s the guy who wears the ‘don’t mess it up’ hat. If I could sign a contract with that job title on it, that would be great! But that’s sort of where we are.”

Miranda added that although he’s feeling “intimidated,” he’s happy to be involved in literally any capacity. Previously, it was reported that he would serve as a producer alongside Marc Platt.

“If this requires new music, I’m here for that, and if this requires me weighing in on who makes this thing, I’m here for that,” he said. “If this requires me just saying, ‘That doesn’t look like it’s underwater, I’m even here for that! It’s going to be a huge challenge to not make it feel uncanny valley-ish.”

And when Vulture asked him if he’d consider playing a role in the film, Miranda didn’t exactly say yes — although he didn’t exactly rule it out, either.

“I’m such a fan that I can’t picture where I’d fit into that universe,” he said. “But no matter what, I’m here for the ride.”

In addition to The Little Mermaid, Miranda co-wrote the music for Moana (out Nov. 23) with composer Mark Mancina and New Zealand artist Opetaia Foa’i, and he’s starring alongside Emily Blunt in Mary Poppins Returns. He also told Vulture that he’s planning a brand-new, top-secret animated film with Zootopia co-director Byron Howard, although he cautions that it could be years before that makes it to the big screen.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 15/11/2016, 20:03
Messaggio #61


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Da Vulture:

Lin-Manuel Miranda Reveals He’s Making a Secret Disney Film

Since leaving his Broadway phenomenon Hamilton in July, Lin-Manuel Miranda has hardly slowed down, and he's got the Mouse House to thank for it. He'll soon fly to London to start filming the studio's sequel Mary Poppins Returns, where he co-stars alongside Emily Blunt, but first he can celebrate the release of this month's animated Moana, which features several songs penned by Miranda. Though Miranda's work on Moana was only announced last summer, he secretly spent years on the project: Indeed, Disney chief creative officer John Lasseter and Moana directors John Musker and Ron Clements hired him before Hamilton became a hit. All involved are keen to continue the collaboration, and when Miranda sat down with Vulture yesterday, he divulged that he's now collaborating with Zootopia co-director Byron Howard on a new animated film they are building from the ground up.

"That's the fun thing about working with someone and having it go well — you go, 'Okay, what else can we do?'" Miranda told Vulture. "Lasseter took me aside and said, 'I have an idea: Here's Byron, and you guys should start talking.'" Though he was excited, Miranda couldn't say much else about the project, except to caution that it could take years to bear fruit, given the glacial pace of animated production. "We literally haven't gotten in the room yet," he said, "but we're plotting."

Something only incrementally further along is a live-action version of Disney's classic musical The Little Mermaid, which Miranda boarded last July. "I'm intimidated," confessed Miranda, who speaks reverently about the Oscar-winning 1989 film and even named his son Sebastian because of it. "This came out of a conversation with Disney, and basically they were like, 'There's no bigger fan of this movie than you, and no bigger public supporter.'"

Though it's been reported that Miranda would co-produce the project and write new songs for it with Alan Menken, he said his participation is still being worked out. "We're in super-early talks — I literally don't have a title for what my job on The Little Mermaid is yet. Right now, it's the guy who wears the 'don't mess it up' hat. If I could sign a contract with that job title on it, that would be great! But that's sort of where we are."

After meeting with Menken and getting his blessing, Miranda has dived into the project headfirst. "If this requires new music, I'm here for that, and if this requires me weighing in on who makes this thing, I'm here for that. If this requires me just saying, 'That doesn't look like it's underwater,' I'm even here for that! It's going to be a huge challenge to not make it feel uncanny valley–ish." And if it requires Miranda to take a role himself, then what? "I'm such a fan that I can't picture where I'd fit into that universe," he said. "But no matter what, I'm here for the ride."


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 4/12/2016, 20:53
Messaggio #62


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Novità:

Alan Menken annuncia che ci saranno (e lo spera) anche le canzoni del musical di Broadway nel remake live-action di La Sirenetta.

Ecco l'articolo da Hollywood Reporter (evidenziato e sottolineato in blu la parte che riguarda La Sirenetta):

Alan Menken, Glenn Slater Talk Collaborating on Broadway's 'A Bronx Tale' and That 'Sausage Party' Song (Q&A)

The two tell THR of writing with Chazz Palminteri, learning from ‘Galavant’ and whether their ‘Little Mermaid’ musical numbers will be in Disney’s reboot with Lin-Manuel Miranda.

In Broadway’s A Bronx Tale, audiences hear homages to hitmakers gone by: Frank Sinatra, Otis Redding, Chuck Berry, Bobby Darin, The Shirelles, Marvin Gaye and The Temptations, to name only a few.

“We’re both addicted to pop music,” says lyricist Glenn Slater, who collaborates with composer Alan Menken for the new musical. “One of the reasons we work well together is because we each know so many different genres and what makes them work. For this project, we wanted it to sound as if you were walking down the streets of the Bronx on a summer afternoon, and listening to what’s coming out of radios in the windows and the cars.”

This time, Menken and Slater — who are also behind the music of Disney’s Tangled, the ABC series Galavant and that Sausage Party song — found themselves writing new music alongside show producer and seasoned record exec Tommy Mottola, and Chazz Palminteri, the book writer who also penned the original play and 1993 movie from his personal experiences. Co-directed by Robert De Niro and Jerry Zaks, the production about a young boy torn between his father and a local Mob boss opens Thursday at the Longacre Theater.

Before opening night, Menken and Slater sat down with THR at New York City’s The Glass House to talk Bronx Tale grit, Galavant dreams and what they’ll do if their Sausage Party number ends up nabbing an Oscar nomination.

How did writing for this project differ than others you’ve done?

MENKEN Chazz Palminteri first mentioned to me fifteen years ago, when I was scoring his movie Noel. With this project more than any other, Chazz wanted to be in the room with us — the opening number, originally called “Sitting on My Stoop,” has some lines from Chazz. I gotta say, we had a great time.

SLATER We’d have both of them in the room: Tommy Matolla wanted everything to sound like the real music of that time, not the watered-down Broadway version. He’d shout about every guitar sound and every bit of reverb: “This is right; they would’ve never done this back then.” Same with Chazz with the language: “They would’ve never said that back then, that’s a word you would’ve heard ten blocks down.” Authenticity was always the top concern.

How did you translate the film’s grit and violence into musical theater?

SLATER Figuring out when characters should sing or speak, while still making it coherent, was challenging. In “Hurt Someone,” the instinct is to do the West Side Story quintet. But when everyone sings at the same time, it loses some of the edge and the stakes feel a lot lower. We needed the violence to feel as real as possible.

MENKEN Also, “Aint It the Truth.” You basically have these wise guy friends saying the rules of the neighborhood: you gotta dress nice and strut yourself. Then it goes to another level of risqué, and then to racial stereotyping. We want to be funny and then add a little lump in your throat, but you gotta play that carefully. Finding that line of, it’s all fun in games until something happens.

What's the most challenging thing about writing for an adaptation?

SLATER Giving people somewhat of what they expect but also not being too limited by that. This movie has so many classic lines and moments everyone knows and loves. In a traditional musical, they’d feel like anecdotes that might not end up being used, but in a story that’s essentially a series of anecdotes, you need to honor those moments.

MENKEN In a way, you hide your craft a bit. The audience who comes to this show just loves the story and that era, and wants to be taken on a journey. Our job in a way is to be invisible and support the vision. But those limits are good. The hardest assignment is one with no guidelines: “Write whatever you want.” In Tangled, we did 20 versions of “I See the Light” — just pick one!

SLATER We wrote the big belty ballad duet, and they said, “We want it quieter.” Alan said, “What about this?” “That’s too folky; that’s too quiet.” It went on for hours. Any of those versions could’ve been a hit song.

If you don’t use a line or a musical phrase, do you bank it for another project?

SLATER No. It’s always fresh.

MENKEN Nothing has any value unless it works for what we wrote it for. When we worked on this, we also had Galavant: sixty songs over two seasons. Believe me, we learned how to throw out material without a second glance! I gotta say, I don’t want Galavant to just go away. I’d like there to be some kind of a stage version. There’s so much great material that went into those two seasons.

Do you ever read reviews or social media reactions of your work?

MENKEN I’ve stopped. I’m very proud of the work and I know what the intention is, and you just hope those who come can see that and accept it for what it is. Whenever reviews come out, I hope to be knee-deep in three other projects and not day-to-day invested in the reactions or the box office, because that work is done.

SLATER For me, the high point is when it’s just us writing in that room together. By the time we open, it belongs to the actors and the audiences.

What advice would you give to new composers and lyricists?

MENKEN A musical is the most collaborative of forms. What’s precious is not that song you wrote or that idea or musical phrase you had, but your creativity and pure involvement in the process. Don’t get attached to anything in particular; stay in the moment, pour your talent out and the results will come.

SLATER Yes. It’s all about telling a story. Expect to write twice as much material as you’ll end up using, and embrace that. Write the song that comes to your mind, and the song someone else suggests, and see what works.

MENKEN The better song is not always the best song for the show. Sometimes, what’s required for that moment is something that’s going to support other things.

SLATER When we did Leap of Faith, we wrote 19 songs for the second slot of the show. I’d guess half of them were better than what we ended up with, but that didn’t tell the story as well.

You previously collaborated on the Little Mermaid Broadway musical. Will those songs be in the Disney reboot with Lin-Manuel Miranda on the creative team?

MENKEN Very likely, yes. I hope so. Unbelievable material. Disney seems to be — God bless them — pulling out so many sequels and reboots and I’m just going, “Ah!” It’s wonderful, I guess, and at the same time, it’s amazing how film companies will announce, “This is happening!” Then a year goes by and nothing, and then all of sudden, they go, “Now!”

Right now, Lin is involved with Mary Poppins [Returns]. I’m incredibly excited to work with Lin on this, whatever it’s going to be. He’ll be writing, I guess lyrics? Or book ideas? It’s not defined at all. Nobody knows at this point.


You also wrote the opening song for Sausage Party. How was that writing process different?


MENKEN The original song was an assignment that’s almost like Belle’s [opening song in Beauty and the Beast], and it was supposed to be wink at Disney. I wrote a very complicated song with two countermelodies and three parts — it was a musical theater masterpiece, but a lot of that audience watched it and went, “Huh?”

SLATER It was clever and was probably entertaining from a musical theater standpoint, but it didn’t set up the story as well and probably wasn’t as funny in some ways. We started simplifying this and that, adding different lines.

How do you feel about Sony’s awards push for it?

MENKEN They’re serious about that song — it’s a little scary! [laughs] I’ve done some press for it. I’m very amused by the whole thing. I love Seth Rogen and I love that he’s happy, and whatever happens, great.

SLATER Oscar songs fall into a couple of categories — you always have the big soaring ballads — but you don’t often get just this R-rated WTF-er. There hasn’t been anything like this since [“Blame Canada” from] South Park, and that was 1999.

MENKEN But [if it gets nominated,] how are they gonna present on the show?

SLATER You’d have a song that’s all bleeps! If they want us to write a censored version, sure.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 28/12/2016, 19:19
Messaggio #63


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Novità:

Lin-Manuel Miranda parla della Sirenetta e della versione live-action del film.

Da TheDailyBeast:

THE VOICE
Lin-Manuel Miranda on President Trump: ‘I Know What I’m Going to Fight for in the Years to Come’
The lyrical genius reflects on his huge year, including his Oscar-worthy tunes in ‘Moana,’ the otherworldly success of ‘Hamilton,’ and his show’s message to VP-elect Mike Pence.

[omissis]

How did the Moana gig come about?
You know, I was one of several songwriters they interviewed. I think they had Opetaia Foa’i onboard—they were huge fans of his music—and I think they also had Mark Mancina onboard. I think they were looking for another songwriter from the theater world to help flesh out the world—to focus on the storytelling aspects of the lyrics and the music. They knew my work on In the Heights and Hamilton hadn’t happened yet, but I got to meet with Ron [Clements] and John [Musker] and I basically told them: “I’m here because Little Mermaid was my favorite movie as a child. You guys are the reason I’m even in this room.” I sent them the opening number I’d written for Neil Patrick Harris at the Tonys, and got the job.

Since Little Mermaid was your favorite film growing up, did you have a favorite character?
Yes! Sebastian the crab—not just because my son is named Sebastian, but he’s the only composer in the Disney universe. He’s a songwriter! He’s such a reluctant hero. He goes along on the journey because Ariel fucks up his concert! She doesn’t show up for the concert, and so it’s funny that now I’m a songwriter, but I just loved his character. He was always my favorite.

Is your son named after Sebastian from The Little Mermaid?
[Laughs] I don’t think he’s named after him. I don’t think my wife would have let me do that. “Let’s name him after a fictional crab!” But in certainly didn’t hurt, in my mind, that it was a name I was inclined favorably towards. My Catholic confirmation name is also Sebastian, after Saint Sebastian, and it’s just a cool bilingual name. Sebastián in Spanish sounds dope. When you have a Latino kid who’s going to speak both, you want him or her to have a name that’s going to hang in both languages.

[omissis]

Just to bring things full-circle, I heard that you’re doing the music to the live-action Little Mermaid film. Is that true?
Talks are sort of premature. Basically, what happened was that they’re planning a live-action adaptation and I sort of threw my hand up in the air as the chairman of the Don’t Mess It Up Committee. If that leads to me writing music, fine, or if that leads to me just weighing in on stuff and not writing anything, that’s also fine. I’m just the guy with the biggest Little Mermaid hat on wearing all the merch, so you should have me in the room when you’re making these decisions!


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
I seguenti utenti hanno apprezzato questo post:
Scissorhands
messaggio 30/12/2016, 13:48
Messaggio #64


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 7.317
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 18/12/2006
Da: Campobasso/Angers




Piccolo OT:
Ieri rivedendo il bellissimo The Odd life of Timothy Green mi sono accorto che Miranda aveva una piccola parte!
Che bello vederlo nell'universo Disney ben prima di Moana!


User's Signature


thanks to giagia
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 1/1/2017, 15:53
Messaggio #65


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Sì Miranda è veramente bravissimo.

Qui un altro articolo in cui parla Miranda e aggiorna sul film della Sirenetta.

Da Broadway World:

Lin-Manuel Miranda Gives Updates on IN THE HEIGHTS, LITTLE MERMAID Films

by BWW News Desk Dec. 28, 2016

In a new interview with The Daily Beast, Tony, Emmy, Grammy (and potential EGOT) winner Lin-Manuel Miranda discusses his new film MOANA, the status of his big-screen adaptation of IN THE HEIGHTS and his reported role in an upcoming live-action reboot of Disney's THE LITTLE MERMAID.

Asked if there was any stage musical he believed would make a smooth transition to the big screen, Miranda jokes, "If there was I don't know if I would tell you because someone might take that and run with it! I know that Jason Alexander was close to adapting Once on This Island for the screen once. That's a great musical, and I'm surprised that nobody has done that in any screen form. It's a great score."

He continues, "Adapting a stage musical to film is one of the hardest things you can do. It's why I'm taking my time both with Heights and with Hamilton. With Heights we're back on track with The Weinstein Company, and we're really excited by the people we have involved-particularly because [filmmaker] Jon Chu just makes fuckin' incredible musical numbers already. He's really amazing with dance sequences and he's a child of immigrants, so gets the story in his bones in a very real way. I'm excited to see what he does with the material, and I'm excited that Quiara [Alegria Hudes], my co-writer, is working on the screenplay because I feel like she will honor the integrity of what we made together. But that being said, it's going to be hard and we still might fuck it up! It's hard to turn a two-act thing into a three-act thing. It'll be interesting to see what we come up with."

The HAMILTON creator also clears up reports that his will be composing the music for the live-action LITTLE MERMAID film for Disney. "Talks are sort of premature," he explains. "Basically, what happened was that they're planning a live-action adaptation and I sort of threw my hand up in the air as the chairman of the Don't Mess It Up Committee. If that leads to me writing music, fine, or if that leads to me just weighing in on stuff and not writing anything, that's also fine. I'm just the guy with the biggest Little Mermaid hat on wearing all the merch, so you should have me in THE ROOM when you're making these decisions!"


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
winnie & pimpi
messaggio 19/2/2017, 20:12
Messaggio #66


Millennium Member
******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 1.170
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 17/5/2008
Da: London




Lindsay Lohan ha scritto su instagram che farà parte del remake della Sirenetta. Mi sembra molto improbabile.

Lindsay Lohan Ariel
Helmed by Bill Condon – the man behind the Twilight Saga, Beauty and the Beast and Dreamgirls – Lindsay posted online that she will play the lead role in the movie reboot and she'll star alongside athlete Kristen Graham as baddie Ursula. It seems it's a family affair as the 30-year-old wrote that her younger sister, Ali Lohan, will sing on the soundtrack for the live action flick's theme tune.

"I will sing again, as #ariel#thelittlemermaid @disney approve that#billcondon directs it along with my [email protected] singing the theme song for the soundtrack. also @kgrahamsfbplays Ursula. Simply because, she is the best. take one. @disneystudios," she posted alongside a snap of herself looking much like the animated red-head.

Last November, LiLo tagged the film studio in an Instagram post picture of Ariel, captioning it her "dream role."


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Arancina22
messaggio 19/2/2017, 20:19
Messaggio #67


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 17.542
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 15/10/2009
Da: casa mia




...Ma poi che c'entra questa Kristen Graham con Ursula?


User's Signature

Your special fascination'll
prove to be inspirational!
We think you're just sensational,
Mame!
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Fulvio84
messaggio 20/2/2017, 15:01
Messaggio #68


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 2.667
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 8/4/2007
Da: Caserta




Lindsay Lohan si è bruciata il cervello un po' di anni fa... vaneggia!
La Disney non le affiderebbe mai il ruolo di Ariel... l'intero post che ha pubblicato è solo per attirare l'attenzione.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Daydreamer
messaggio 20/2/2017, 19:54
Messaggio #69


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 4.701
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 9/4/2008
Da: Brescia




A me quella ragazza fa una pena terribile, mi spiace come tanto precoce talento e bellezza si siano potuti volatilizzare così.


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
I seguenti utenti hanno apprezzato questo post:
Klauz_star
messaggio 22/2/2017, 15:06
Messaggio #70


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 2.073
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 9/11/2008
Da: italia




Lindsay sarebbe andata bene per il ruolo almeno una decina di anni fa, ora come ora andrebbe bene per intepretare Vanessa l'alter-ego di Ursula. Insomma Ariel ha 16 anni sarebbe un controsenso farla interpretare da una trentenne anche se ex idolo dei teen agers...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
Bristow
messaggio 25/2/2017, 18:46
Messaggio #71


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Utente
Messaggi: 6.373
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 25/3/2006
Da: Lecce (Puglia)




CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 20/2/2017, 18:54) *
A me quella ragazza fa una pena terribile, mi spiace come tanto precoce talento e bellezza si siano potuti volatilizzare così.

Davvero peccato, a me piaceva tantissimo, talento e bellezza che poteva mettere a maturare... e si è rovinata...
Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post
veu
messaggio 27/2/2017, 23:39
Messaggio #72


Gold Member
*******

Gruppo: Moderatore
Messaggi: 17.969
Thanks: *
Iscritto il: 27/8/2005




Anni fa Lindsay Lohan sarebbe andata benissimo perchè era giovane, adesso è ormai decisamente troppo matura per interpretare Ariel. Poi ovvio i sogni sono sogni, nessuno li deve distruggere però dubitiamo altamente che la Disney la possa chiamare per interpretare Ariel, sia per l'età sia per la sua vita privata che è stata al centro del gossip mondiale in questi anni.

La notizia comunque ha già fatto il giro del web. A tal proposito ecco qua uno dei tanti articoli italiani che ne parla, da Bestmovie:

La sirenetta: ecco l’insospettabile attrice che vorrebbe tanto interpretare Ariel nel live action Disney

La vediamo molto dura…

Per quanto non abbia ancora ottenuto il semaforo verde ufficiale, sappiamo già da un pezzo che la Disney sta attualmente preparando un adattamento live action de La sirenetta, amatissimo classico del 1989.

E in caso la major stia già iniziando a cercare la sua attrice per il ruolo della protagonista Ariel, ecco arrivare la prima autocandidatura online: niente di meno che quella di… Lindsay Lohan! Proprio così, la star di Mean Girls, Quel pazzo venerdì e Herbie – Il super maggiolino poi caduta in disgrazia per via dei suoi numerosi scandali e giri in tribunale.

Per l’occasione, l’attrice ha postato una propria foto su Instagram in paragone ad Ariel (sì, ammettiamo una certa somiglianza), specificando che se la Disney approvasse, lei sarebbe assolutamente disposta a vestire i panni della piccola sirena.

Probabilmente una quindicina d’anni fa la Lohan sarebbe stata davvero la favorita per la parte, ma ora come ora, qualcosa ci dice che il suo sogno non si avvererà affatto. Che ne pensate in proposito?


User's Signature

Go to the top of the page
 
+Quote Post

22 Pagine V  < 1 2 3 4 5 > » 
Fast ReplyReply to this topicStart new topic
1 utenti stanno leggendo questa discussione (1 visitatori e 0 utenti anonimi)
0 utenti:

 

RSS Versione Lo-Fi Oggi è il: 17/9/2019, 13:11