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> Aladdin (Live-Action), Walt Disney Pictures
veu
messaggio 4/5/2019, 0:20
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CITAZIONE (theprinceisonfire @ 3/5/2019, 10:30) *
Nonostante la massiccia promozione (in USA), prevedo ancora un relativo insuccesso al botteghino, soprattutto se il punteggio di rottentomatoes dovesse scendere sotto il 65 per cento.


Perchè insuccesso? in questi ultimi mesi sembra ci sia più fiducia nel progetto Aladdin in USA (in Europa non sappiamo, già in Italia esce tra meno di 20 giorni e non c'è uno straccio di pubblicità)... è vero che non ha un cast all stars ma ci sembra che ci sia maggior fiducia nel film


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veu
messaggio 4/5/2019, 0:26
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Dal sito WMagazine, intervista a Naomi Scott (Jasmine):

Wishing For Naomi Scott, Aladdin's New Princess Jasmine and Hollywood's Next Movie Star

A few minutes before my interview with Naomi Scott, the 26-year-old Londoner who plays Princess Jasmine in the new live-action version of Aladdin, I get a call from the director Guy Ritchie that puts me on alert. Ritchie isn’t generally the type to offer up immoderate praise, but on the subject of Scott he gushes with abandon. “Naomi is something of a nuclear reactor when it comes to radiating generosity and talent,” he says, adding that her natural charisma is downright “intergalactic.”
So of course I’m prepared for a letdown when Scott turns up that morning at a West Hollywood restaurant. What if her allure is merely interplanetary? But shortly after she settles into a corner booth, wearing a white top and chunky boots, I start to see what Ritchie means. First, Scott charms the hostess, the waiter, and a passing infant in a stroller, and by the end of breakfast she has my phone in her hand so she can record a video message for my young niece and nephews—a personalized shout-out from Princess Jasmine. (Her idea.) True, she’s an actor, and most actors can be convincingly likeable for an hour or two. But the growing buzz about Scott, who also costars alongside Kristen Stewart in this fall’s new installment of Charlie’s Angels, is especially notable because she’s not even sure whether acting is her real calling. With a budding career as a singer and songwriter and other stuff too, Scott possesses an array of traits and passions that once may have seemed contradictory but that for her generation, she hopes, is becoming routine. She’s a devout Christian, she’s a Brit with Indian heritage, she’s a footballer’s wife, she’s shooting her own music videos and producing another project for a U.K. rapper. “I’m a mix of a bunch of things,” she says.
One thing Scott definitely isn’t: a princess. So when she got a callback after her first Aladdin audition in London, she decided that some strategizing was in order. The self-described tomboy made a quick trip to the Topshop on Oxford Street to buy a flowery dress, since she had none in her closet. “It was light blue,” she recalls. “I never wore it again.” After more readings, meetings, and some screen tests opposite Mena Massoud, who plays the titular street urchin turned prince, Scott finally got the offer, ending a months-long worldwide search that involved hundreds of Jasmine candidates. (Will Smith, as the Genie, was confirmed early on.) “Cut to when I show up at the first rehearsal, and I’m wearing my Nike tracksuit,” Scott says. “It was like, ‘This is the real me—ha ha, tricked you!’ ”
Scott and the filmmakers also spent a lot of time developing the character of Jasmine, who in the animated version was two-dimensional in every sense of the term. Although in 1992 Jasmine may have qualified as a strong heroine, with her insistence on defying tradition in order to marry the man she loves, Scott felt that in 2019 there was plenty of room to humanize the character and flesh out what she calls her “boss lady” tendencies. There’s a new plotline that has the princess standing up to the evil Jafar to protect the freedom of her kingdom. “It happened that Disney and Guy and the producers were all of the same mind-set in terms of what they wanted for this character,” Scott says. “That really excited me and made me be like, ‘I’m-a get this role.’ ”
Ritchie recalls that when he first met Scott in London, he didn’t even know she’d been singing for years and was already wrapping up the third EP of her own songs. But he soon realized she had the chops to do more than just belt out a decent rendition of “A Whole New World.” The soundtrack for Ritchie’s Aladdin includes two new songs by the original composer, Alan Menken, who collaborated with Benj Pasek and Justin Paul, of La La Land fame. So this time, Jasmine gets her own soaring anthem, called “Speechless.” “It’s basically her declaration that she’s not going to be silenced, which, as we all know, is a message that’s very important right now,” Scott says. “That idea of being a catalyst—if you speak up, maybe I can speak up.”
Scott began singing as a kid in church, and by her teens was acting in projects like the sci-fi series Terra Nova and the Disney TV movie Lemonade Mouth. (Her biggest film gig so far was in the 2017 Power Rangers movie.) But she always figured that singing and songwriting would be her main vocation, and the plan is still to make it big in the music world. “I don’t see myself as a niche artist,” Scott says. “I think that I have the bits that can translate commercially when the time is right.” Genre-wise, she’s been influenced by gospel pop from artists like Mary Mary and Kirk Franklin, though recent songs are more steeped in R&B and are clearly not geared toward Sunday morning church playlists—or Disney soundtracks. In the single “So Low,” which Scott released last year, she bemoans a lost love who was dazzled by the wrong things. (“Did no one tell you that the grass ain’t greener?/L.A. ain’t sweeter/It’s just full of dreamers.”) Still, this year she plans to record at least one track with a full choir as backup.
Scott’s parents are both pastors at a church on the outskirts of London. (Her mother’s family emigrated from India to Uganda and eventually to the U.K.; her father is English.) “I’m sure there are many things that come to mind when people hear ‘pastor’s kid,’ ” she says. But her parents’ take on Christianity was less rigid than stereotypes would suggest. “Ultimately, what’s really important is having an openness to questions,” Scott says. “I’m definitely a questioner in every sense—and if someone shuts down my questions, then I question even more. Like, hmm, there’s something weird there.” Scott says her parents essentially allowed her to discover her faith on her own, which not only made it stronger but also helped her relate to those who don’t share it. “Yes, I have a belief system, but I don’t know everything, and we’re all just as messed up as each other,” she says. It was in church at age 16 that Scott met her future husband, the soccer player Jordan Spence, who’s now a right back for Ipswich Town. Married since 2014, the two work as a team on music projects, including an upcoming video for the rapper Nick Brewer that they’ll produce and direct. (Scott hasn’t signed with a label and says she prefers to stay independent for the freedom it allows.) But Scott’s incoming movie offers keep complicating the couple’s schedule. Elizabeth Banks, who three years ago signed on to direct the new Charlie’s Angels, had met Scott in 2016 on the Power Rangers set and figured she’d be perfect to play Elena, one of the three Angels. During casting, unaware that Scott had just been hired as Jasmine, Banks’s team reached out to Scott’s reps. “They were like, ‘Well, she’s doing Aladdin. Bye!’ ” Banks remembers. Then Banks’s start date was delayed, and she managed to bring Scott in for a reading in London.
This time, Scott didn’t need to pass for someone who knew her way around a royal palace. “I was looking for an everywoman,” Banks says. “A relatable girl next door that audience members could look at and go, ‘If that girl can become a Charlie’s Angel, then I can, too.’ ” After Scott’s reading, “the studio executives watched about 40 seconds of her tape and were like, ‘Yup.’ ” Once filming started, Banks saw that Scott was up to pretty much anything she could throw at her, including improvised scenes, which can flummox even veteran comic actors. “People are going to see a lot of range from Naomi,” Banks says. “I think this is going to be an epic year for her.”
While it’s still easy for Scott to bounce around L.A. or London without being recognized, she’s been getting some foretastes of the relentless scrutiny that’s inseparable from stardom these days. Within hours of the announcement of Aladdin’s full cast, a round of sniping began on Twitter as some users lamented that Scott’s background isn’t Middle Eastern. (The film’s setting is the fictional city of Agrabah, but in earlier versions it was Baghdad, and the original story comes from The Thousand and One Nights, also known as The Arabian Nights.) Scott chooses not to snipe back. As a mixed-race person, she knows what it’s like to be considered too white, and not white enough, among other perceived shortcomings. “My responsibility is to the character,” she says, adding that she’s proud of the diversity of the entire cast.
In the broader world of social media, Scott, who admits to a people-pleasing side, is still searching for ways to disregard the snarky remarks of whomever the anonymous troll du jour might be. “It’s hard, man,” she says. “I’m not going to lie to you and say I never look at Twitter to see what people are saying about me. Anyone who says that is a liar! So you have to train yourself. It’s actually like a discipline not to look.”
Banks remembers that when she first observed Scott on the Power Rangers set, the actress was in her early 20s, but she was already married and exuded a grown-up aura that set her apart from her young costars; there was something serene and settled about her. To Scott herself, those qualities can still seem elusive. “I’m a work in progress,” she says. “I know I’m going to mess up and say the wrong thing and not always get it right.” For now, “I’m just trying this approach of being honest, of being myself, and seeing how it goes.”




Dal sito IndiaToday scopriamo che tra le candidate al ruolo di Jasmine vi era anche l'attrice indiana Tara Sutaria:

Tara Sutaria reveals she was meant to play Princess Jasmine in Will Smith's Aladdin

Tara Sutaria revealed that she was meant to play Princess Jasmine in the live-action remake of Aladdin, which stars Will Smith.

Tara Sutaria is the newest diva in town. The actress, who will soon make her debut in Student Of The Year 2, revealed that she was going to play Princess Jasmine in the Guy Ritchie directed live-action remake of Aladdin.

The film also stars Will Smith, Naomi Scott and Mena Massoud in pivotal roles.

Will Smith will be making a cameo in the song 'Radha Tera Chunari', which features Ananya Panday and Tiger Shroff.

In an interview, Tara said, "I was actually supposed to do another film with Will Smith a year before we started Student of the Year 2 in London. I was working on this film Aladdin, which is, in fact, releasing a week after SOTY. So, I was meant to play Jasmine in that film. We would have worked together on that film and it is so ironic that I didn't end up doing that film, but I am doing this and he actually came here and we ended up working on this."

However, she did not reveal why she chose SOTY 2 instead.

Tara called the experience of working with Will Smith fun and said that the actor is 'larger than life' and he turned out exactly as she thought he would be.

Student of the Year 2, directed by Punit Malhotra, will hit the screens on May 10. The film stars Tiger Shroff, Tara and Ananya Panday in important roles.



Avreste preferito Tara Sutaria a Naomi Scott per il ruolo di Jasmine?


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Daydreamer
messaggio 4/5/2019, 7:06
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Sicuramente la Disney ha messo in piedi una scuderia di nuovi talenti in giro per il mondo, con la sua scuderia di produzioni localizzate. Tanto di cappello. La Sutaria non la conosciamo, ha fatto troppo poco, bella lo è certamente. Interessante l'idea di puntare già sulle origini indiane per il personaggio. Direi che la Scott è un po' più affidabile globalmente parlando, potrebbe giocarsi con questo ruolo il suo futuro di attrice di serie A, come è stato per la Wasikowska con Alice e per la James con Cenerentola. Anche Charlie's Angels potrebbe davvero darle una bella vetrina. Insomma scelgo la Scott perché è pronta per il lancio finale.


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theprinceisonfir...
messaggio 4/5/2019, 9:18
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CITAZIONE (veu @ 4/5/2019, 0:20) *
Perchè insuccesso? in questi ultimi mesi sembra ci sia più fiducia nel progetto Aladdin in USA (in Europa non sappiamo, già in Italia esce tra meno di 20 giorni e non c'è uno straccio di pubblicità)... è vero che non ha un cast all stars ma ci sembra che ci sia maggior fiducia nel film


Veu purtroppo (o per fortuna) il pubblico sembra essersi stancato dei remakes dei classici. Dumbo ha avuto una performance ampiamente sotto le aspettative, e a malapena riuscirà a ricoprire i costi di produzione.

Box office pro, sito affidabilissimo, prevede il weekend di apertura di Aladdin a 65 miioni di dollari, ed un incasso totale sotto i 200 milioni in Usa Vedete?

Sarebbe un risultato disastroso. Aladdin deve incassare almeno 600 milioni Worldwide per rientrare nelle spese.
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messaggio 4/5/2019, 16:02
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secondo me il problema non sta tanto nel remake o non remake, ma nel produrre un prodotto qualitativo.
La bella e la bestia live action con tutte le pecche del caso, e' stato comunque un gran bel film, mentr Dumbo l'ho trovato parecchiod eludente specialmente nella seconda parte del film e quindi il passaparola non ha aiutato, cosniderando che la mia stessa opinion l'ho ritrovata condivisa in moltissime altre persone.
Se Aladdin sara' un buon prodotto, probabilmente, avra' successo, altrimenti ennesima cantonata.
In linea di massima MArvel a parte stanno prendendo decisioni non particolarmente azzeccate e i risultati si vedono.
Dovrebbero prendersi un attimo per riflettere e capire veramente dove vogliono andare, rimettersi in contatto col DNA dell'azienda...si andassero a fare un paio di maratone di classici e capissero meglio il genio di Walt


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messaggio 8/5/2019, 0:33
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Spot TV, "Confident":

Click


Manifesto pubblicitario anteprima francese:





Nuovo Spot "Inside" :

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Spot "Agrabah":

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Spot "Fresh Prince":

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Spot "Pronti a sognare" (in francese):

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Spot "Not Your Average Princess":

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Spot "Trapped" (dedicato a Jasmine):

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Spot denominato "Jafar" (anche se con Jafar non c'entra nulla):

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Spot "Never Interrupt Me":

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Estratto clip "I wish to become a Prince":

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Estratto antecedente la scena di A Whole New World:

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Will Smith al The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon canta Un amico come me:

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Will Smith a Good Morning America parla di Aladdin:

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Mena Massoud intervistato su Build:

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Mena Massoud e Naomi Scott a Good Morning America parlano di Aladdin:

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Altri promo con Mena Massoud, Will Smith, Naomi Scott e Nasim Pedrad:

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Manifesto Dolby Cinema:




Nuovo manifesto per la versione 3D:




Immagini varie:













Illustrazioni:











Descrizione dei personaggi e curiosità del dietro le quinte:

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BennuzzO
messaggio 8/5/2019, 16:22
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Le illustrazioni sono davvero stupende! Spero che sia possibile trovare del materiale che le contenga anche qui in Italia.


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veu
messaggio 9/5/2019, 0:12
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Speriamo Bennuzzo... per ora non si sa niente di eventuali uscite dei libri in Italia... speravamo che almeno la versione romanzo o la versione del film della Giunti (come hanno fatto per Cenerentola e la Bella e la Bestia) la editassero... in Italia Aladdin sta passando proprio sotto silenzio, peccato perchè come titolo potrebbe attirare molto... solo che ormai la Disney ha abituato a quei soliti 3 o 4 film e del resto se ne frega..


Dalla press kit del film:

While director Guy Ritchie had never helmed a musical prior to “Aladdin,” his films are heavily influenced by music. “This is a musical in its purest traditional form,” he says, “and I liked the challenge. I didn’t try to be too ambitious or try to reinvent the wheel in terms of a musical, but I did want it to feel like it was fresh enough while still keeping the original tone of the first film.”

The score and songs by eight‐time Academy Award® winning composer Alan Menken and Oscar‐ winning lyricists Howard Ashman and Tim Rice from the 1992 film are perfect as is, but Ritchie wanted to make them feel more contemporary, both lyrically and musically…an idea that Menken embraced wholeheartedly. The songs in the animated film were embedded in the music of the Arab world with flourishes of jazz here and there. Menken’s new arrangements incorporate pop elements and showcase the musical talents of Will Smith.

The lyrics for “Prince Ali,” the film’s biggest song‐and‐dance production number, were tailored to better fit the actor’s persona. Says Smith, “‘Aladdin’ is a rare combination of cinematic tools. Very few films have singing, dancing, drama, comedy, action and special effects…all those elements in a single movie, and we have it in a single scene.”

“Guy really wanted to take chances with the music but at the same time he was deeply respectful of the original songs,” continues Smith. “He knew how he wanted it to sound and how he wanted it to feel but gave me the freedom to use my hip‐hop background and bring a fresh vibe to it.”

The live‐action score is very symphonic and resonant of old Hollywood in many aspects. “Most of the time Guy likes things to be very spare, but there are times when the score just explodes,” says Menken. “It is obviously pulled from the themes of the songs, almost exclusively, but it is much more live action in its textures and its tone.”

“Arabian Nights” is now a complete musical number that serves as an introduction to the story and its enchanted setting. Menken worked with Oscar®‐and Tony Award®‐winning songwriters Benj Pasek and Justin Paul (“La La Land,” “Dear Evan Hansen,” “The Greatest Showman”) to create new lyrics. “The job really was to be following along with the camera as it soars through Agrabah, setting up this world for the audience,” says Menken. “We rewrote some of the lyrics to go with the visuals that Guy had in mind, introducing Jafar and basically setting the stage for the rest of the film. It’s a much bigger, much more ambitious number than it was originally.”

For Pasek and Paul, working with the legendary composer was the opportunity of a lifetime. “Alan and Howard were our childhood heroes…they wrote the songs that made us want to be songwriters,” says Pasek. “We think the reason our generation is so in love with musical theatre and the reason this resurgence is happening right now is because of Howard and Alan. We grew up loving musicals and musical theatre storytelling and that’s because of what these guys wrote.”

“When we were first starting out and someone would ask us what we wanted to do or who we wanted to be, it was always, ‘We want to be Alan Menken, Howard Ashman. We want to write for Disney, like for a Disney animated musical…that’s our dream,’” says Paul.

And the admiration is mutual. “Benj and Justin are like my progeny, so to speak; they are wonderful,” says Menken. “I’m tough on writers, but these guys are really, really good. I wanted this to be a real collaboration between Justin and Benj and me, not just, ‘Oh, Alan Menken and the next collaborators or whatever,’ that wasn’t the point. The song is a collaboration of our styles, as it should be.”

“Speechless” is an original new song written by Menken and Pasek and Paul, performed by Jasmine, who is ready to find her voice. “It starts with a solo piano, very intimate, and really gets into the soul of Jasmine,” explains Menken. “And then as it builds, it builds in the arrangement and the intensity and then at the end comes back full circle to that intimate piano with her voice reaching out over it. It has a beautiful arc to it, but the sound is orchestral and pianistic.”

“This is Jasmine’s big breakout song where she decides she is going to stand up for what she believes in,” says executive producer Marc Platt (“Mary Poppins Returns”), who worked with Pasek and Paul on “La La Land.” “The song parallels her arc in the story, sung timidly by Jasmine early on and then as a big empowering moment later in the film. Jafar has seized power as her father stands by helpless, and she finally has the strength to tell him what she envisions for her future.”

“As the script was developing, it became clear that this Jasmine was going to be more powerful and outspoken than ever and that it was time for her to have a big number,” says Paul. “Her character was emerging as someone who would have this moment to really stand up and say, ‘I do have a voice, and I will not remain speechless.’”

“This is a woman who is being told who she has to be and how she has to live in the world, and then she doesn’t have a voice,” adds Pasek. “So it made a lot of sense for this really strong woman that so many girls have grown up loving to talk about reclaiming her own power.”

The choreography designed by Jamal Sims (“Hairspray,” “Step Up”) was somewhat contemporized as well. Both “Prince Ali” and “Friend Like Me” feature break‐dancing moves, giving them a modern feel and sense of authenticity, too. “These are both big performance pieces,” says producer Dan Lin. “It was both the Genie’s time to shine and the perfect opportunity for Will to show how multi-talented he is‐he has to act, sing and dance in the iconic set piece.”

For “One Jump Ahead” performed by Aladdin as he and Jasmine are being chased through the streets of Agrabah, the choreographed moves were fast‐paced, athletic and more appropriate for a Guy Ritchie film. “We never intended for Aladdin to dance in that song,” Sims says. “It is more of a stylized action sequence. There is a lot of movement, but the moves belong more in the stunt category.”



Dal libro The Art Of Aladdin:

In the original film, the introductory song "Arabian Nights" is sung by an old merchant known as the peddler, who sets the scene for the magical world of Agrabah. Lyricists Benj Pasek and Justin Paul wrote new lyrics for the song to reflect the change in who was singing the song.

"It was not someone who was living in Agrabah; it was someone who was coming to this city," says Paul. "We were tasked with giving the audience a visceral, stimulating vision of what this film's Agrabah is: a sort of meeting place of cultures. We wrote lyrics about the spices, the people bartering, and the bazaars because we wanted to color the experience for viewers as they're being welcomed into the world of Aladdin."

"With new lyrics from Pasek and Paul, 'Arabian Nights' is now twice as long as what is in the original movie," notes Sullivan. "As soon as we played the new instrumental track for Will, he yelled, 'This is the way I wanna open all my concerts!' It's just so bold and cinematic."

One of Jasmine biggest moments in the film comes in the form of a new song written by composer Alan Menken and lyricists Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. Frustrated by being silenced, Jasmine unleashes a powerful ballad that allows her to find her voice again. The songwriters came up with the idea while working in Menken's studio and went through a few versions before landing on the final arrangement.

"We've been playing with arrangements a lot," Menken says. "We had a very pop-oriented arrangement initially, which I think works beautifully, except that it didn't feel in keeping with the fabric of the rest of the score. Instead, we've gone with a more orchestral version. It'll feel much more like a piece from the score, and I think it's that much more integrated."

When they finally played the song for music supervisor and producer Matthew Rush Sullivan and music editor Chris Benstead over the phone, the impact was immediate. "As soon as we heard it, we thought, 'Wow that's it, that's it,'" Sullivan remarks. "She's been told, growing up, she should be seen and not heard. She finds her voice throughout the movie, and at the end she puts her foot down, and says, 'I'm not going to go speechless.' It's one of the biggest, strongest moments of the movie."

Alan Menken adds, "We really had to work with the book to plant the seeds of her feeling intimidated and feeling like she's not allowed to speak her mind, and have the song come at just the right moment when she says, 'No, I will not remain speechless anymore.'"

"We were really inspired by the original movie," Benj Pasek notes. "The 'ahah' moment for us was when we went back to the source material. Jafar says condescendingly to Jasmine late in the film: 'You're speechless, I see. A fine quality in a wife.' It felt right for her to make a declaration that she would not be subjugated in that way. It was a real opportunity for her to stand her ground and sing about those philosophies, and felt like a natural extension of this very strong, powerful, and determined Disney princess. I think people gravitate to Jasmine because she is such a strong female character, and we were inspired by that and aimed to give her a song, and a moment, that matched her power."

While the team did pre-record the vocals for the scene, Sullivan also prepped actress Naomi Scott to perform the song live on set. "We really wanted to capture Naomi's best performance on the set and give her the flexibility to deliver a performance that is true to the emotions that she's feeling in that very moment," he notes.

"All the crew had goose bumps when she sang 'Speechless' on the stage," executive producer Kevin De La Noy says. "All of us just looked at each other thinking, 'We just witnessed history.' It took everyone's breath away. Everyone just knew that that was extraordinary. And it's not just the lyrics of the song — they were great, and the music is great — it's what she then did with it."

Scott was able to tap into Jasmine's intense emotions during the evocative, empowering musical number, accurately demonstrating this major turning point for Jasmine.

"She's shut down by Jafar throughout the movie, and she really wants to lead, and she's trying to persuade her father to see her in that light," Scott says of Jasmine. "This song is an expression of her just not raking it anymore. It's that moment of realization of who you are. That actually, as a woman, you already hold so many amazing qualities and skills that are strong. Having feminine qualities is really strong and amazing and actually makes you a better leader and actually helps you see the world in a different and a better way."




Segnaliamo che vi è stata questa sera a Parigi la presentazione ufficiale del film, la prima europea con Mena Massoud, Naomi Scott, Will Smith, Alan Menken e il regista Guy Ritchie.


Conferenza Stampa del Cast a Parigi:

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Spot dedicato al Genio - "Wingman":

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Naomi Scott e Nasim Pedrad presentano il film:

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Intervista a Alan Menken che discute sul progetto creativo del live action di Aladdin e canta anche un po' di Speechless (la canzone singola di Jasmine):

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messaggio 10/5/2019, 0:18
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Lista canzoni e musiche con indicazioni di chi le canta:

1 - Arabian Nights (Will Smith)
2 - One Jump Ahead (Mena Massoud)
3 - One Jump Ahead Reprise (Mena Massoud)
4 - Speechless (Naomi Scott)
5 - Friend Like Me (Will Smith)
6 - Prince Ali (Will Smith)
7 - A Whole New World (Mena Massoud & Naomi Scott)
8 - One Jump Ahead Reprise 2 (Mena Massoud)
9 - Speechless Reprise (Naomi Scott)
10 - A Whole New World (End Credits - Zayn & Zhavia Ward)
11 - Friend Like Me (End Credits - Will Smith featuring DJ Khaled)
12 - Speechless (End Credits - Naomi Scott)
13-37 - Score and Demos by Alan Menken



Qui il video musicale A Whole New World di Zayn e Zhavia Ward:

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messaggio 11/5/2019, 0:02
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Dal sito TGcom24:

"Aladdin", il cast "vola" sul tappetto rosso

Il centro di Londra si è trasformato per una sera nella misteriosa Agrabah, in occasione della première europea del live-action "Aladdin". A sfilare sul magico red carpet il regista Guy Ritchie, accompagnato dai protagonisti Mena Massoud (Aladdin) e Naomi Scott (Jasmine), dal cattivo Marwan Kenzari e dal Genio della lampada Will Smith. Quest'ultimo ha ammesso di aver avuto qualche difficoltà a confrontarsi con il suo predecessore Robin Williams, che doppiò il Genio nella versione animata del 1992. "E' stato profondamente stressante e complicato. Quello che fece Robin Williams fu rivoluzionario per l'animazione: trasmise al personaggio la sua personalità. Ho provato a fare lo stesso, con il mio passato hip hop ho creato il mio Genio" ha dichiarato Smith.



Il regista Guy Ritchie, Marwan Kenzari (Jafar), Wll Smith (Genio), Naomi Scott (Jasmine) e Mena Massoud (Aladdin)




Il cast a Londra alla presentazione:

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La Première a Parigi con il cast:

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Nuovo spot Disney's Aladdin - "Friend" TV Spot:

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Spot dedicato a Jafar (attenzione! spoiler! lo si vede trasformato da Genio):

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Il Principe Ali incontra Jasmine - clip - “Prince Ali” Aladdin 2019 | TV Spot:

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A Whole New World - clip in Tedesco:

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Dietro le quinte:

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Featurette "Cast of wonders":

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veu
messaggio 12/5/2019, 23:52
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Mena Massoud parla sul lavoro con Will Smith e Guy Ritchie:

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Nuovo spot:

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Tv Spot “The Lamp”:

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Tv Spot "Dalia" :

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Tv Spot "Tiger":

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Il cast al Graham Norton Show:

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One Jump (la canzone) - ne sentite un pezzo:

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Mena Massoud parla a EW:

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Discover a whole new Aladdin world with EW's collector's edition

Want to get one jump ahead on Aladdin before the new live-action film directed by Guy Ritchie hits theaters on May 24? Come discover a whole new world in EW’s new Aladdin collector’s edition that dives into the tale of Disney’s beloved animated street rat, brought to life by Mena Massoud, as he falls in love with a more modern Princess Jasmine, played by Naomi Scott, as the two find each other in the bustling Arabian port town of Agrabah, with a little help from a friend like no other, the big, blue magical Genie conjured up by Will Smith.

The special issue sheds light on how Ritchie updated Disney’s 1992 animated classic to represent a more modern, inclusive world, and a diverse lead and supporting cast that find their own ways to put their stamp on the beloved characters. Meet Scott’s Jasmine, who’s juggling the responsibilities of being the Sultan’s daughter while wanting to see the world; hear from Massoud about doing his own stunts in the action-packed movie; and discover how Smith put his own fresh spin on the iconic Genie. Composer Alan Menken and songwriters Benj Pasek and Justin Paul also explain their process in updating the classic songs and penning new tracks for a new audience, Nasim Pedrad breaks down new character Dalia (handmaiden to Jasmine), while Marwan Kenzari — a.k.a. Hot Jafar — discusses the perks of playing a villain.

And then there’s the rich, vibrant, expansive Agrabah set that Ritchie and his team created in the English suburbs, where the director, production designer, and costume designer share their secrets on how they brought the animated film into the real world. And, of course, no Aladdin feature is complete without the scene-stealing Magic Carpet, monkey Abu, and the feisty Rajah.


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messaggio 15/5/2019, 23:46
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Poster Cinemark (molto bello):




Characters Poster:

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Clip sulla scena del ballo:

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Presentazione a Parigi con Menken al piano:

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Il "Prince Ali" clip in inglese:

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Il Principe Ali - clip in tedesco:

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Featurette con Will Smith:

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Nuovi promo:

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Tv spot "Stumbled On":

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Altro spot:

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Interviste al cast:

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Un tabellone:

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Menken canta la prima parte di Speechless (la canzone di Jasmine) a Londra:

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Nuovi Tv spot (nel secondo c'è la scena del bacio tra Aladdin e Jasmine):

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BennuzzO
messaggio 16/5/2019, 11:48
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Io non sto più nella pelle, sono eccitatissimo!
Ma non si sa nulla di un eventuale album Panini? Speravo che lo facessero, ma siamo al 16 di maggio ed ancora non ci sono notizie a riguardo sad.gif


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Daydreamer
messaggio 16/5/2019, 21:32
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Sulla pagina FB di shopDisney Naomi Rivieccio (doppiatrice canora della nostra Jasmine) intona un pezzettino de "Il mondo è mio" e...Sì, la Brancucci lo ha fatto di nuovo", diverse parole cambiate rispetto al testo originale.


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messaggio 16/5/2019, 22:54
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BennuzzO, in effetti di Aladdin tra album delle figurine e libri in Italia non c'è assolutamente nulla... e pensare che hanno fatto uscire libri sullo Schiaccianoci che è stato un floppone in tutto il mondo... chissà perchè la Disney su Aladdin non ci punta mai, mah... che vergogna!

Daydreamer, ma le parole de Il mondo è mio sono cambiate nell'adattamento italiano??? Quella canzone è sacra per il film, è LA canzone del film e una delle canzoni più note di tutti i tempi della Disney (solo I sogni son desideri e Biddidi Boddidi Boo di Cenerentola o La stella su nel ciel di Pinocchio sono celebri come Il mondo è mio nell'immaginario collettivo)... speriamo abbia almeno fatto un buon adattamento (gli adattamenti delle canzoni di Frozen non sono male, ma quelle di Rapunzel o La Principessa e il Ranocchio sono terribili - vi ricordate Ward nei panni di Facilier che parla anziché cantare? - e nemmeno quelle di Oceania sono chissà che perle di adattamenti, a parte che non sono granché nemmeno in originale , salvo una o due, speriamo che almeno Il mondo è mio sia adattata bene)


* Segnaliamo che i protagonisti del film sono stati in Giordania per la promozione del film e sono stati ospiti della Famiglia Reale di Giordania che ha avuto una visione privata del film (e a loro è piaciuto molto) e Mena Massoud, Naomi Scott e Will Smith hanno detto di essersi trovati molto bene con la famiglia reale della Giordania.
Naomi Scott ha detto che per interpretare Jasmine si è ispirata alla Regina Rania di Giordania, molto affezionata al suo popolo.


Dal sito ArabNews:

Cast of Disney’s ‘Aladdin’ takes a ride to Jordan

Director Guy Ritchie was joined by actors Mena Massoud, Naomi Scott and Will Smith at a press junket in Amman
The team attended a screening after the press conference
DUBAI: The cast of the upcoming live-action version of Disney’s “Aladdin” visited Jordan on Monday to promote the film, ahead of its wider Gulf release.

Director Guy Ritchie was joined by actors Mena Massoud, Naomi Scott and Will Smith at a press junket in Amman, where the actors talked about their experiences shooting the film.

The press event also saw Egyptian-Canadian actor Massoud speaking in Arabic: “Inshallah, may God bring more happy days to the Arab and Muslim communities and Ramadan Kareem” he said.

Jordan’s Wadi Rum, a famous desert destination in the country’s south, was one of the locations where some major scenes were shot.

Smith, who plays the iconic Genie character, took to Instagram to thank the “Royal Family and the People of Jordan for allowing our Aladdin family to film in your gorgeous country.”

A short video showed four of them at the Amman Citadel, another tourist destination in Jordan.

willsmith
Verificato
Ramadan Mubarak to all! Thank you to the Royal Family and the People of Jordan for allowing our #Aladdin family to film in your Gorgeous country! ‏السلام عليكم

Massoud echoed Smith’s gratitude to the people of Jordan and the royal family on his Twitter account.

Mena Massoud

@MenaMassoud
To the great People of Jordan and the Royal Family - your generosity and beauty will forever be remembered by all of us in #Aladdin. Shokran ���� Kol sana wintoo taya2bean

The team attended a screening after the press conference, and they were joined by Prince Ali bin Hussein, the chairman of Jordan’s Royal Film Commission.

They will head to Mexico and Japan as part of their international press tour.




Dal sito JordanTimes:

Aladdin star Naomi Scott ‘inspired by Queen Rania’

Mena Massoud says film shooting in Jordan, Arab World will help tourism

AMMAN — The unique character of Her Majesty Queen Rania was my source of inspiration, Aladdin star Naomi Scott said.

“She [Queen Rania] is incredible from what I have seen of her... she really does embody the idea of being human,” Scott said in an interview at the Royal Film Commission in Amman on Monday.

“Yes she is royal, but she is just a human and she is someone who has great leadership qualities,” she exclaimed.

Scott plays the role of Princess Jasmine in Disney’s live action remake of “Aladdin”, to be commercially released on May 23.

Though she was not among the cast members when some scenes of the movie were shot in Jordan, Scott finally managed to visit the Kingdom.

“I was really upset [for not being able to be in Jordan with the rest of cast] because [when] they came back all they were talking about is how shooting in Jordan was the best part of the movie,” she added.

“I am incredibly excited to [finally] be here,” Scott said.

Parts of the movie were shot in the dazzling desert of Wadi Rum, which has been the main attraction for filmmakers from all over the world.

Mena Massoud, another cast member of Aladdin, thinks shooting films in Jordan and the region is “important” as it reflects the beauty of Wadi Rum in Jordan, and the rest of the region.

“I am very proud of this film, the diversity in it and also the landscape that we choose to represent,” he told The Jordan Times.

He recounted that Morocco is a successful example of a country attracting film productions.

“I think we are certainly seeing that in Morocco where they are getting a lot of film work, and I think it definitely helps tourism in other countries like Jordan and Egypt,” he added.

Both actors were excited to be part of this movie. Scott described the whole experience as “magical” while Massoud said it was a great honour and privilege for him to be able to play his role.

He expressed hope that the audience would enjoy it.

Inspiring talent

Sending a message to the world, Scott told on all women and girls: “Believe in yourself.”

“If I were seven years old in 2019, what would I want to see? I think I would want to see a character to whom I can relate. Not someone perfect, but someone with the drive,” she said.

Massoud noted that his Egyptian background was a source of inspiration for him during his cinema work.

“There is great rich cinematic history in Egypt... [It] was once and continues to be a central to the regional entertainment scene. I grew watching those movies and actors. They had huge influence on me and I think you know people might see that a bit in [my] performance,” he added.

Massoud urged artists to commit and work hard to achieve success in an industry he described as “tough”.

“The film industry is hard whether you are an actor or writer... It is just a tough business,” he said, adding that as long as “you’re passionate about it and willing to learn, then you will succeed”.

He voiced hope that he and his talented fellow artists from the region will stand as a source of inspiration for artists in the region.



Dal sito The National:

Stars Will Smith, Mena Massoud and Naomi Scott arrive in Jordan to promote Aladdin

The actors took a part in press conference where they discussed filming parts of the movie in the Kingdom


Aladdin star Mena Massoud has wished all those fasting a blessed month during Ramadan.

The Egyptian Canadian actor, who himself is a Coptic Christian, made the gesture as part of press conference held in Amman to promote the upcoming live action reboot of the 1992 animated classic.

The 27-year-old, who was joined on stage by fellow stars Will Smith (who plays the role of the genie), Naomi Scott (Princess Jasmine) and director Guy Ritchie, opened his remarks by stating “Inshallah, may God bring more happy days to the Arab and Muslim communities and Ramadan Kareem.”


It set the scene for an engaging press conference where all actors discussed various aspects of the film.

The National was part of a select group of regional press invited to watch Aladdin last night in Amman.

Due to an embargo, details cannot yet be revealed at length, but suffice to say that the movie is a guaranteed crowd pleaser and should be enjoyed by all age groups. In short, it’s fantastic. It’s funny, it’s flamboyant, it's witty, and I suspect it will do big business in the box office when it premieres in the UAE on May 23.

In the meantime, here are here are a few insights we gleaned from the press conference to raise your anticipation even further.

Will Smith’s son convinced him to play The Genie

While many of Hollywood’s A List would consider the flamboyant blue Genie as a role to die for, Smith revealed he agonised about taking on the part. It took a chat with his son, singer and actor Jaden Smith, to seal the deal.

“There were three or four films that I was considering and I was having a hard time making a decision about what I wanted to,” he said.

“Jaden walked in and he said ‘Dad, what are you doing?’ and I told him that I had all these movies and I have to pick one by Monday. And he told me to tell him the stories. So I pitched him all the stories and the last one was the genie. He looked at the (Aladdin) screenplay and grabbed the other ones and threw them on the floor and just said ‘Duh!”

Mena Massoud loved his shoot in Jordan

With a select few scenes requiring a vast desert landscape, Massoud and Smith were the only two major actors who took part in the Jordanian shoot which took place at the majestic Wadi Rum. Massoud recalled the experience as a career highlight and praised the Jordanian people and technical support crew.

“The people are so incredibly generous and kind,” he said.

“Being out in the desert was just amazing. I mean, there is such a peace out in the middle of the desert. There is nothing like it.”


Naomi Scott always had an affinity with Princess Jasmine

The British actress and singer called the character a favourite ever since she first watched the original animated film as a 7-year-old. Even at that young age, Scott recognised that she shared of the feisty character traits of the princess.

“There is such a power in seeing yourself in the character, especially when you are a seven year old girl. And that’s what you gravitate to, the character you know you can play,” she said.

“I felt empowered watching Jasmine and all we wanted to do was keep that feeling but modernise here.”

What’s next for the stars in Jordan?

With the completion of the press duties on Monday, the stars will attend a screening later in the evening in the presence of Prince Ali bin Hussein, the chairman of Jordan's Royal Film Commission.

The Amman-based body were responsible for facilitating Aladdin’s Jordanian shoot by organising film permits and hiring of 150 locals to supplement the existing crew. The following day Massoud and Scott continue their international press tour with stops in both Mexico and Japan.


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Daydreamer
messaggio 16/5/2019, 23:33
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Dal poco che ha cantato, non si capisce se sarà effetivamente la versione del film o lei che semplicemente non si ricordava le parole. Ad ogni modo non sono state parole stravolte, era molto vicino all'originale italiano.


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Arancina22
messaggio 17/5/2019, 0:11
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Intanto la clip di Prince Ali che hanno messo su diversi canali YouTube sta ricevendo un bel po' di commenti negativi di gente delusa che ne critica la staticità rispetto al Classico. You don't say...!

Messaggio modificato da Arancina22 il 17/5/2019, 0:13


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messaggio 17/5/2019, 0:36
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CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 16/5/2019, 23:33) *
Dal poco che ha cantato, non si capisce se sarà effetivamente la versione del film o lei che semplicemente non si ricordava le parole. Ad ogni modo non sono state parole stravolte, era molto vicino all'originale italiano.

Ho sentito anche io, ma essendo pezzetti cantati cosi per le Instagram story all'anteprima potrebbe essere che non si è ricordata effettivamente bene le parole. Non avrebbe senso cambiare una canzone in cosi pochi stralci, o la lasci tutta come nel classico o la cambi tutta.
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nicolino
messaggio 17/5/2019, 8:14
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Sono state mostrate anche altre clip dove canta per la presentazione ufficiale del film e anche li’ le parole cambiano, non credo sia stata una sua dimenticanza. Ad ogni modo concordo, sono cambiamenti minimi, e il senso e soprattutto la METRICA, almeno stavolta, sono stati mantenuti. Mi sembra comunque presto per tirare un sospiro di sollievo.

Comunque nessuno che fa i complimenti a questa ragazza? E’ davvero bravissima e la sua voce è perfetta. Simile sia all’originale che alla controparte Naomi Scott. Pure Manuel Meli mi è parso nel ruolo, ricordandomi molto l’Aladdin del classico animato.

Ancora perplesso per l’assenza di promozione italiana. Cioe’, abbiamo davvero avuto solo UN trailer doppiato, e’ Inconcepibile.

Qualcuno ha notizie sulle recensioni? Quelle che ho letto sembrano molto, molto tiepide e anche quando sono positive, mi sono parse un po’ forzate (un critico lo ha definito il miglior live action dopo Il drago invisibile, il che mi sembra un tutto dire).
Altri dicono che non sarà cio’ che in fan si aspettano, mentre sono ricorrenti le critiche della durata della pellicola (troppo lunga a loro dire) e a Jafar, che alcuni hanno definiti “incommentabile”.

Messaggio modificato da nicolino il 17/5/2019, 8:16
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Daydreamer
messaggio 17/5/2019, 8:22
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Bravissima e potentissima la Rivieccio. Lo dissi anche con la diffusione del trailer. Meli purtroppo non l'ho sentito ma se non capita prima mi manterrò la sorpresa per la sala. Forse sui social è poco pubblicizzato ma sui magazine nazionali più popolari (Sorrisi e Canzoni, Chi, Ciak ecc.) hanno fatto una bella copertura mediatica. Sorrisi addirittura un piccolo concorso per le famiglie all'anteprima. Credetemi che gli italiani sanno che sta per arrivare.


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BennuzzO
messaggio 17/5/2019, 10:10
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Commento puramente estetico: la bellezza di Mena Massoud e Naomi Scott è sconvolgente. Credo che siano due ragazzi bellissimi e, personalmente, li trovo perfettamente calati nella parte.


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I seguenti utenti hanno apprezzato questo post:
Simba88
messaggio 17/5/2019, 10:22
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Non mi sembra abbiate riportato questa notizia, quindi ve la scrivo:

Aladdin: Gigi Proietti sarà la voce italiana del Sultano di Agrabah

Riceviamo e condividiamo il comunicato stampa che annuncia un nuovo ingresso nel cast vocale dell’edizione italiana di Aladdin, il film diretto da Guy Ritchie nelle sale il prossimo 22 maggio.

Si tratta di Gigi Proietti, che nel film d’animazione originale aveva prestato la voce al Genio e che nella nuova doppierà il Sultano:

Gigi Proietti sarà la voce italiana del Sultano di Agrabah nel nuovo film Disney live action Aladdin, nelle sale italiane dal 22 maggio. Sovrano dell’immaginaria città portuale in cui era ambientato anche il Classico d’animazione del 1992, il Sultano è un leader saggio e rispettato. Con sua figlia, la Principessa Jasmine, è un padre affettuoso e devoto ma troppo protettivo: il suo obiettivo è trovare per lei un marito adeguato.

“Il mio personaggio in questo film è il caratteristico sultano delle favole”, ha commentato Gigi Proietti. “È un uomo buono ma al tempo stesso severo, sa essere autorevole ma anche autoritario, a seconda di ciò che richiedono circostanze. Ha una grande responsabilità: un giorno qualcuno dovrà ereditare il sultanato, ma a quei tempi non poteva essere una donna e lui ha una sola figlia. Alla fine lui troverà una soluzione, che naturalmente non posso rivelare! Quello che posso dire è che oggi c’è molto bisogno di favole e questa è senza dubbio la più classica, traendo ispirazione da ‘Le Mille e una Notte’, arricchita da una tecnologia incredibile”.

Rivisitazione in chiave live action del classico d’animazione del 1992, Aladdin è diretto da Guy Ritchie e vede Mena Massoud nel ruolo dell’affascinante furfante Aladdin, Naomi Scott nel ruolo della bellissima e indipendente principessa Jasmine e Will Smith nei panni dell’incredibile Genio con il potere di esaudire tre desideri per chiunque entri in possesso della sua lampada magica.

Il film vanta una colonna sonora composta dall’otto volte Premio Oscar® Alan Menken (La Bella e la Bestia, La Sirenetta), che comprende nuove versioni dei brani originali scritti da Menken e dai parolieri, vincitori dell’Oscar®, Howard Ashman (La Piccola Bottega degli Orrori) e Tim Rice (Il Re Leone), oltre a due brani inediti realizzati dallo stesso Menken e dai compositori vincitori dell’Oscar® e del Tony® Benj Pasek e Justin Paul (La La Land, Dear Evan Hansen).

Il cast del film vede inoltre la presenza di Marwan Kenzari nel ruolo del potente stregone Jafar, mentre Navid Negahban veste i panni del Sultano, preoccupato per il futuro di sua figlia; Nasim Pedrad è Dalia, la migliore amica e confidente della principessa Jasmine, Billy Magnussen interpreta il principe Anders, il bellissimo e arrogante pretendente di Jasmine, e Numan Acar è Hakim, braccio destro di Jafar e capitano delle guardie del palazzo.

Fonte: Badtaste.it
https://www.badtaste.it/2019/05/07/aladdin-...agrabah/371167/


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Daydreamer
messaggio 17/5/2019, 13:57
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Vero Simba, è stato proprio un bell'omaggio aver scelto Proietti quale doppiatore seppur chiaramente di un altro personaggio.


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messaggio 18/5/2019, 22:43
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Sì è un bell'omaggio.


Che ne pensate del Castello di Agrabah che si affaccia sul mare?


Dal sito EW un articolo interessantissimo sulla creazione della città di Agrabah e un po' di ricerche grafiche:

How Agrabah was brought to life in Disney's live-action Aladdin


The Markets of Agrabah



Ritchie is known for weaving fast-paced action sequences into his films and Aladdin is no different, as the film kicks off with Aladdin and a disguised Jasmine being chased through the labyrinth of Agrabah’s streets by the palace guards in the “One Jump” sequence. “We just wanted to make it mysterious, all these fairs in Marrakech have these wonderful, secretive alleyways for running around … so we created quite long runs for the actors so the cameras could chase them through,” Jackson told EW. “Guy loves to do real time things and play with that so we had some great alleys you come running around an be confronted.”

Then came the details, from building real tanneries to alleyways where clouds of kettles filled with rose water flew up when Aladdin and Jasmine raced by. Jackson said she wanted to include as many interesting sights as possible, even if they didn’t make it into the film. “There’s someone in stocks … and if you run through the courtyard, there are people doing basket work, then run behind that through an alley and there’s huge, big jars above you, there’s constantly things to look at. And that’s great for the Magic Carpet [scenes] as well,” Jackson said.

In Ritchie’s film, Agrabah is also a port city that rests on the cusp of Eastern and Western nations, making it a thriving trade town and bringing together a melting pot of cultures and influences that lend itself directly to a new backstory for Jasmine.

“One side of Agrabah is water and behind the palace is sand dunes, it’s like Namibia where the sand dunes go right down to the sea,” Jackson said. This helped for the storyline involving Prince Anders of Skånland (Billy Magnussen), who comes to town seeking Jasmine’s hand in marriage. “He arrives on a ship and is carried into town on his carriage, so everything comes and goes on ships, which gives Agrabah quite a good connection to the rest of the world,” Jackson explained. “That’s why Jasmine is quite worldly and she has got a lot of information and when you see the Sultan in his place, he has quite a big collection of stuff from around the world, because they traded with other countries.”


The Sultan’s Palace



Jackson said that initially there were talks of filming Aladdin in Morocco and having that be the setting for Agrabah. “In the end, I think it’s great that we didn’t because I think I was freer just to pull things from where I wanted them, I didn’t just have to be Moroccan, I could go anywhere I liked in my imagination,” she said. To design the Sultan’s palace, Jackson said she found a Burmese monastery made of wood, painted gold and distressed with age, and that was the foundation of the building. “Of course, it got huge and became more Byzantine as it built up, but the premise was to paint everything in versions of gold so all the gold against each other, I just thought it was really interesting,” she said.

To craft the interiors, Jackson then looked to a plethora of influences. “The reference that I had was a real mishmash — obviously you can’t lift anything directly or you’ll get done by everyone right, left, and center so you have to steal a bit of this, a bit of that and a bit of the other, and mix it up and make it your own,” she explained.

“I loved Iznik ceramics, I love Turkish and Persian miniatures … there’s the Orientalist paintings that I used, a lot of the Victorians used to go on those wonderful journeys and do these fabulous paintings stuffed full of detail.”

And then there’s an actual, live 1,000-year-old olive tree that became the centerpiece for the palace courtyard. “It looks rather beautiful I think, in the middle there with all the carpets up on the wall and around the outside, and for me, it gave [the set] a lovely aging,” Jackson said. “The [palm] trees and bougainvillea gave it — for me bougainvillea means heat and I just wanted all the things that make you think of a hot country. Although it’s quite dry, there are things that flourish in the heat, we had some prickly pears in there as well.


Aladdin’s Tower



Even living in the streets, Aladdin has always dreamt big and his home in a dilapidated tower reflects his big imagination. “Guy wanted to feel that Aladdin wasn’t just living under a sack, that he was quite inventive and created a mysterious, wonderful place for himself,” Jackson said. This is where he brings Jasmine at the beginning of the story as they hide out from the palace guards, and Jackson said they wanted to create a space that would impress even a princess. “He pulls this cord and up goes this beautiful hand-painted canopy, and she is absolutely astonished by this beautiful [sight] and then he says, ‘I have the best view,’ and to her slight horror, there is this absolutely gorgeous view of the palace, which he sits and looks at and dreams about, and of course she’s trying to escape,” Jackson said.


The Parade



When Aladdin uses one of his three wishes to be made into a prince named Ali, the Genie makes sure to give him a lavish entrance into Agrabah as he heads to the palace to win Jasmine’s hand. To bring the expansive song-and-dance number for “Prince Ali” to life, Jackson had to create a multi-functional set that would accommodate the spectacle. “We had this huge pageant and we had Aladdin on top of a huge carved camel covered in flowers, so he was way above the crowd, and the Genie came in on beautiful dais with flowers and girls, and it was just a sensation,” Jackson said. “We had tumblers and wonderful performers and dancers, so for that, we needed a huge amount of space because it was a huge crowd of people, so the parade circled around the old town, and then it went through the upmarket part of the town and it ended up at the gates of palace that was gold and gorgeous.”


Jafar’s Hideout



As the ambitious and manipulative Grand Vizier to the Sultan, Jafar would need his own space in the palace to plot his dark deeds. “We imagined there was a tall tower that’s slightly separate from the rest of them and he lived up there,” Jackson said. “I went a bit more Islamic with the decoration in there, it was quite ornate and he had a great big orrery in the middle of his room that turns.”

This will be the setting for when Jafar attempts to get rid of Aladdin and steal the magic lamp for himself. Jackson added that as part of the reshoots for the film, they decided to give Jafar another space. “We decided when we did the reshoots that they wanted to make him even badder, so in the reshoots in the summer, we built him a dungeon to do more nefarious things in, so he suddenly had more detail and more storytelling, so that was fun to give him a bit more character.”


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