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> Mary Poppins Returns - New original live-action musical film, Walt Disney Pictures
Daydreamer
messaggio 28/10/2018, 21:50
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warhol sui dialoghi è confermata Domitilla? Forse la Manicone avrebbe un timbro più vicino alla Rossi, non so.


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nicolino
messaggio 29/10/2018, 11:11
Messaggio #170


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Figuriamoci.
Quando Dominitilla D'amico doppia un'attrice, anche se prima di allora tale attrice veniva doppiata regolarmente da un'altra doppiatrice, da quel momento in poi stai pur certo che "apparterrà" alla D'amico per l'eternità. XD
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warhol_84
messaggio 29/10/2018, 16:56
Messaggio #171


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CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 28/10/2018, 20:50) *
warhol sui dialoghi è confermata Domitilla? Forse la Manicone avrebbe un timbro più vicino alla Rossi, non so.

Yes, nel parlato sarà Domitilla D’Amico.
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Mad Hatter
messaggio 29/10/2018, 21:37
Messaggio #172


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Lo sapevo, ma onestamente mi spiace perché, nonostante la Domy sia bravissima, su questa specifica attrice ci ho sempre preferito la Manicone.


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veu
messaggio 9/11/2018, 0:43
Messaggio #173


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Il film avrà 9 canzoni.



Dal sito EW:

Mary Poppins Returns brings a wonder woman back to this week’s EW cover

“Everybody’s walking around with their cheeks a little pinker, and you just know that everybody…they’ve got a secret. They’ve got something really good under wraps until Christmas.”

That’s the picture Meryl Streep paints for EW of the set of Mary Poppins Returns, Disney’s high-stakes, high-magic sequel to the 1964 musical classic. Any number of elements from the original film — its indelible songs by Richard and Robert Sherman, its career-making performances by Julie Andrews and Dick Van Dyke, its significant strides in animated penguin awareness — have amounted to Mary Poppins being nothing less than a crown jewel for Disney for more than five decades. So it’s only natural that all eyes are now on the people entrusted with bringing Mary Poppins back to audiences this December — and as EW learned spending time with them for this week’s cover, the cast and filmmakers behind Mary Poppins Returns feel they’re sitting on a movie with more than a little shine of its own.


Sharing the cover of EW’s Holiday Preview, Emily Blunt and Lin-Manuel Miranda sat down for a conversation about the biggest movie of their careers (and perhaps the most ambitious sequel of the year that doesn’t involve an Avenger). Blunt, 35, was director Rob Marshall’s first choice to inherit the role of magical nanny Mary Poppins — and Julie Andrews gave her approval as well — yet for Blunt, stepping into the iconic part required a stiff upper lip. “I did, going into this, [hear] the preamble of everyone turning to me — including a friend of mine who said, ‘You’ve got balls of steel’ — and I would just try to allow all of that to be white noise and really approach her as I would any other character,” recalls Blunt, who first began collaborating with Marshall on 2014’s Into the Woods. “The beauty of Rob is that he kept it intimate enough so that you don’t feel the bigness too much. We just focused on this story and these people and this moment.”

But Blunt allowed the gravity of Mary Poppins to seep in every once in a while, like when Dick Van Dyke came to set and serenaded her with “Jolly Holiday” between takes…or when she revisited the original film after wrapping (“I showed my oldest daughter and it was this incredible two-pronged emotion because I thought, ‘Thank God I didn’t watch this before I did the movie'”)…or when she visited Miranda backstage at Hamilton in 2015 — her third time doing so, yet the first since they had both signed on to the film. “The whole project was cloaked in a sense of protection, and by that time it had sunk in that it was happening,” she recalls. “It was becoming so deep in my bones that I was going to be doing this, and that first overwhelming rush of thrill and fear when I got offered this role had diluted to something quite real… and so I think it was exciting knowing that Lin and I were going to be playing cohorts and kindred spirits.” Miranda remembers that night just a bit differently: “That was a really stressful show,” he laughs. “I felt like I was auditioning for Mary Poppins, the person.”


Miranda’s Poppins character — Jack, a lamplighter and old friend to Mary and the Banks family — marks the performer’s first major role since creating and starring in Broadway’s Hamilton (look it up). Yet for his big debut, audiences will meet him solely as Lin-Manuel the actor, not Lin-Manuel the Pulitzer-winning writer (although his famous verbal dexterity is certainly on display in the film’s nine new songs, custom-written by Hairspray duo Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman). Miranda calls Poppins his “first big movie,” but acknowledges how unusual the film actually is from the typical big-movie experience. “The highs were so high, in terms of: ‘Today we’re dancing with penguins, tomorrow we’re dancing with Meryl Streep, the next day we’re biking in front of Buckingham Palace,’” Miranda laughs. “For me, coming from theater, the adrenaline source is having the audience there, and when you take that audience away, where is it? Where does that part come from? And you realize, it comes from ‘We’re never coming back to Buckingham Palace to get a second take.’ The adrenaline source is in getting it right in that moment.”

Elsewhere in EW’s deep Mary Poppins Returns carpet bag: another sit-down with director Marshall, who toured us around the film’s London set for EW’s first look last year. Marshall has shepherded movie-musicals to the screen like Chicago and Into the Woods, yet Poppins marks his first original musical and a passion project for the director, who assembled a veteran creative team (including Shaiman, Wittman, producer John DeLuca, and Finding Neverland screenwriter David Magee) to craft a new story from author P.L. Travers’ eight-book series. “I used myself as a barometer, honestly,” says Marshall, who cites 1964’s Mary Poppins as the first film he ever saw. “Just say I wasn’t involved at all. What would I want to see in this film? I knew I wanted to see an animation sequence in the hand-drawn 2D style. I knew I wanted to have those wonderful characters, Mary’s famously eccentric cousins, or uncles, or aunts. But the most important thing was an emotional story. I wanted to find something that you could connect with. When we chose to set it in the Depression era, it felt like today: people struggling to make ends meet, or in this case, to deal with a loss, which many families deal with. How do you move through that? We had to create a reason for Mary Poppins to come back after 54 years, and it had to be real.”


What Marshall and team came up with is a new tale set in the 1930s that reflects the economic hardship of London’s Great Slump. Mary Poppins finds herself revisiting Cherry Tree Lane to help a now-grown Jane (Emily Mortimer) and Michael Banks (Ben Whishaw) raise Michael’s three children (Pixie Davies, Nathanael Saleh, Joel Dawson) after the death of his wife. “They’ve also lost a sense of wonder and joy,” says Marshall. “And the theme that drove me — of finding that child alive inside you — was, to me, an important story to tell. We live in such a fragile time that we need this film. I certainly felt that I needed it. I needed to turn off the news and be launched into a magical world where wondrous things can happen still, and there’s hope.”


If Marshall’s wish comes true, Mary Poppins Returns might deliver some similar optimism to audiences this Christmas. It’s for that same reason that Streep, who sings and dances in the film as Topsy, Mary’s gravity-challenged cousin, calls the film a gift to the world. “I just can’t wait for people to see it,” gushes the actress. “I feel like we have this little secret all tied up in a bow. Why can’t we just give it to them today?”

As Mary Poppins would say: patience, Meryl Streep, patience.


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veu
messaggio 13/11/2018, 0:52
Messaggio #174


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Tre poster francesi:

Click

Click

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veu
messaggio 14/11/2018, 0:51
Messaggio #175


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Dal sito EW:

Mary Poppins Returns is the movie Marc Shaiman and Scott Wittman have been waiting for

Throw a dart at your DVD or Playbill collection and whatever you hit, Marc Shaiman was probably involved in it.

The composer and his songwriting partner, Scott Wittman, form a duo responsible for a host of titles that have become cherished parts of any musical fan’s menagerie: Hairspray, the huge 2002 Broadway and movie hit; Smash, NBC’s gone-but-not-forgotten 2012-13 backstage dramedy; the recent Broadway adaptations of Catch Me If You Can and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory; and countless awards shows in between. Individually, Shaiman has lent his solo talents to bringing evocative musical life to everything from Sister Act, Beaches, and the South Park movie to The First Wives Club, When Harry Met Sally, Sleepless in Seattle, A Few Good Men, Misery, The American President, The Bucket List… and look, just head here and get your Spotify search ready.


All of it is to say that there’s been no lack of revered projects shared between Shaiman, 59, and Wittman, 63. But despite their pedigree, both men still identify as fans at heart who have admired and consumed the great pop culture before them—meaning that when the opportunity arose to potentially write music for Disney’s Mary Poppins Returns, director Rob Marshall’s sequel to the 1964 classic, Shaiman and Wittman might as well have been wide-eyed kids freshly new to New York City for how eager they were to get their foot in the studio door.

“I had the emotion of truly not knowing — and this isn’t just rhetoric — I didn’t know what I would do if we didn’t get this job,” Shaiman tells EW, discussing Mary Poppins Returns for EW’s cover story. “Once I knew it existed and we were up for it, I truly was, like, really in need of psychiatric… I mean, I would have been… I mean, I didn’t know what I would do if we didn’t get it. I was truly thinking, I will have to move to a hut in Tahiti. I won’t be able to live in a world where this movie comes out and we didn’t get to do it. So even with the fear of taking it on…”

Wittman chimes in: “It was scarier not taking it on.”

That’s because Mary Poppins Returns is not just a gig to Shaiman and Wittman; it’s a lay-all-your-cards-out title that marks the high-profile culmination of their ascension as musical theatre’s A-list composers, and in some regards, the peak of their musical style, too. And while the film stands to help them reach their biggest audience yet on a worldwide scale, it also affords the pair the personal chance to live out nothing less than a lifelong dream behind the scenes.

“The kind of music and style that I most ever wanted to write for a movie was just finally right in front of me,” says Shaiman, equating scoring Mary Poppins Returns to finally finding an outfit that fits right off the rack (and if you like that metaphor, you’ll love the music). “I’m certainly writing in a style that you don’t quite hear anymore. I mean, I was so well-suited for this movie because I’m sure there are other directors over the years who have walked away from a scoring session of mine and said, ‘Why is this schmuck scoring my movie like it’s a Mary Poppins movie?’ And finally I actually was scoring a Mary Poppins movie.”

But the love for the music of 1964’s Mary Poppins — with its songs by Richard and Robert Sherman and its score by Irwin Kostal — wasn’t just an accidental bonus; it helped the pair get hired in the first place. Producer Marc Platt, the prolific musical-minded producer behind Wicked, La La Land, Into the Woods, and dozens more, knows well the resume of Shaiman and Wittman (as does director Marshall). Platt says the musicians’ pure love of the 1964 film made them the clear frontrunners for the job. “Where Marc and Scott really won the day, beyond their obvious talents as songwriters, is that they both came from a very emotional place,” recalls Platt. “Particularly Marc, I think, really felt that his love of music and musical film came from the Sherman Brothers, and it lived in such a deep place in him. His and Scott’s craftsmanship, and that emotional connection, was undeniable to us.” Shaiman offers no argument: “This entire movie… is a love letter to the Sherman brothers and to all the other filmmakers on Mary Poppins and it was our way of really saying thank you to them. That’s what it is. It’s just a big f—ing thank you letter to all of them.”

Once Shaiman and Wittman landed the job, the task at hand was to create new songs (and, for Shaiman, an entire score) that matched the sensibility of 1964’s film but stood alone as something singularly original. In songwriting, they had the benefit of already knowing that Emily Blunt would be playing Mary Poppins, the marvelous nanny who returns to Cherry Tree Lane to help a now-grown Jane (Emily Mortimer) and Michael Banks (Ben Whishaw) in 1930s London; moreover, the writers knew that Lin-Manuel Miranda, a Broadway mainstay himself, would be making the transition to film playing an original character named Jack, the heir apparent to Dick Van Dyke’s Bert. “All these songs were bespoke on Emily and Lin, so we had the luxury of having them there to sing every version of everything, which was a big key for us getting into the characters,” says Wittman.

ith Miranda, who gets to rap (or something like it) in two songs in the film, it was a no-brainer to give the Hamilton star a selection of songs that showcased his verbal dexterity, but Miranda’s wish to join the film strictly as an actor — and not a songwriter or composer — added an extra layer of responsibility. “The reason he took the job was to, specifically, be an actor and a performer and exercise that part of him,” says Shaiman. “So we all, Rob included, had to have confidence in our choices of how to present Lin. How much of what people would expect or want from him, to make sure it’s in there, but also to make sure that we weren’t pandering and we were giving him the chance to show other sides of himself.” (The experiment paid off, Miranda tells EW: “One of the most fun things for me as a songwriter who didn’t have to write any songs was just being along for the ride watching Marc and Scott work. I learned a bunch. Scott had all these books, these thesauri of British-isms, literally piled knee-high, with arcane sayings like ‘A real pea souper!’ It was really fun just watching them go through and craft that.”)


Blunt, meanwhile, informed not just the reimagined character of Mary Poppins but the film’s internal production in general. Wittman recalls, “She would come once or twice a week and we’d try this on her, try that on her, and it was so singular to her. She had created this very confident, witty woman, which is what she is as a person, but it also freed up, for us, that version of Mary.” Shaiman points out, “Her courage was contagious — or her confidence, I should say. Can you imagine stepping into this role? One of the most iconic matches of actress and role in movie history! So if Emily could do that and just look straight ahead… it’s cliché, but the British [say], stiff upper lip. She just had such confidence.”


Shaiman certainly inherited some of that confidence, too, in composing a colossal new score for the movie. The five-time Oscar nominee’s score is entirely original, save for a few honored melancholy chords of Kostal’s; all in, he calls Mary Poppins Returns the biggest project of his career on every level. “Spiritually, physically, musically, lyrically, orchestrally… it’s more music than I’ve ever written for any one movie,” he says. “Three weeks of scoring. Nowadays, a movie maybe has four days. And the responsibility of it was big, and then just the logistics! It was just huge, and the orchestra was huge and big and full of virtuosic brilliant musicians.”

But fortunately, Shaiman had cracked something early on in production that helped him, Wittman, and the rest of the filmmakers get through the nearly impossible task of adding a new chapter to the cherished Mary Poppins story. “At all times, the biggest emotions were of excitement like you can’t even contain. A childlike excitement, and then a full terror and fear of ‘How can we possibly take this on?’” says Shaiman. “I think that everyone who decided to accept the job on this movie had to deal with our own ‘Oh my God,’ because it’s just so daunting. But you have to push that fear aside, or use it as energy. That’s how I see it.”


As indicative, if anything, of a key theme in Mary Poppins Returns and one of the philosophies Mary Poppins urges to those in need of a boost, be they wayward young children in need of a nanny or veteran songwriters embarking on a milestone career moment: “When the world turns upside down, sometimes the best thing is to turn right along with it.”


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Daydreamer
messaggio 28/11/2018, 1:12
Messaggio #176


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Per chi volesse, ecco i link a due canzoni inedite del film:

link

link


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buffyfan
messaggio 29/11/2018, 2:41
Messaggio #177


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CITAZIONE (warhol_84 @ 28/10/2018, 15:25) *
A doppiare Emily Blunt nel canto sarà Serena Rossi

è sicuro al 100%? Non mi fa impazzire come scelta, ma non per la Rossi, ma perchè preferisco quando una voce è legata solo ad un personaggio. unsure.gif
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veu
messaggio 30/11/2018, 1:08
Messaggio #178


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Grazie Alessio per le canzoni inedite


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Luca84
messaggio 21/12/2018, 23:05
Messaggio #179


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Ieri l'ho visto al cinema e mi limito a dire che mi é piaciuto clapclap.gif
Non aggiungo altro per evitare spoiler o simili. Ora desidero vederlo in lingua originale per poter avere un quadro completo. Buona visione a tutti laugh.gif
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Beast
messaggio 22/12/2018, 11:45
Messaggio #180


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Ricalca l'originale senza averne i guizzi e il senso di meraviglia. Le canzoni non mi impressionano, comunque le voglio riascoltare in inglese.


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Daydreamer
messaggio 23/12/2018, 21:42
Messaggio #181


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Vi rendete conto che al mio cinema hanno tagliato tutta la sequenza di Meryl Streep? Durante l'intervallo devono avere mandato avanti il minutaggio e quando ho fatto presente la cosa sono venuti giù dal pero, senza manco scusarsi, il pubblico manco se n'è accorto. Non ho parole... Arrabbiato3.gif Quanti minuti mi sono perso? Grazie.

Messaggio modificato da Daydreamer il 23/12/2018, 21:43


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Beast
messaggio 24/12/2018, 13:26
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CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 23/12/2018, 20:42) *
Vi rendete conto che al mio cinema hanno tagliato tutta la sequenza di Meryl Streep? Durante l'intervallo devono avere mandato avanti il minutaggio e quando ho fatto presente la cosa sono venuti giù dal pero, senza manco scusarsi, il pubblico manco se n'è accorto. Non ho parole... Arrabbiato3.gif Quanti minuti mi sono perso? Grazie.

Più probabile trattarsi di un errore nel file che il distributore ha mandato al cinema. A me è successo con John Carter e Spiderman. Nel primo caso proiettarono comunque senza avvisare né scusarsi, nel secondo hanno giustamente annullato gli spettacoli in attesa di nuovo invio del file dal distributore.
Credo che tra canzone e parlato la scena si avvicini ai 10 minuti


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Daydreamer
messaggio 24/12/2018, 14:25
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Grazie mille Beast, ridimensiono e capisco meglio...


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Fra X
messaggio 26/12/2018, 20:22
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CITAZIONE (Beast @ 24/12/2018, 12:26) *
Più probabile trattarsi di un errore nel file che il distributore ha mandato al cinema. A me è successo con John Carter e Spiderman. Nel primo caso proiettarono comunque senza avvisare né scusarsi, nel secondo hanno giustamente annullato gli spettacoli in attesa di nuovo invio del file dal distributore.
Credo che tra canzone e parlato la scena si avvicini ai 10 minuti


post-6-1111076745.gif Mamma mia! wacko.gif
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Fra X
messaggio 25/2/2019, 21:24
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Alla fine in patria ha ben tenuto. Ma non sta lasciando il segno ne lo lascerà.
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Daydreamer
messaggio 26/2/2019, 14:16
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Infatti hanno accantonato una possibilità di dargli un seguito.


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