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> Maleficent, Walt Disney Pictures
Klauz_star
messaggio 16/10/2014, 19:37
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Io mi aspettavo un film diverso, però la Jolie è stata una scelta azzeccata.
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veu
messaggio 29/10/2014, 0:00
Messaggio #986


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Maleficent è un progetto che risale al 2003 quando fu inzialmente pensato come film animato.

Ecco cosa dice Don Hahn in proposito:

Dal sito Burlington County Times:

He's the man behind 'Maleficent'

The popularity of the dark side in entertainment paved the way for “Maleficent” to arrive in theaters.

“We were starting to see films like ‘The Dark Knight’ on screens and shows such as ‘Wicked’ on stages,” Disney executive producer Don Hahn said during a telephone interview. “That was part of the inspiration for ‘Maleficent,’ who is one of the most complex characters in the Disney pantheon.”

The 58-year-old Hahn also served as producer for the Disney epics “Beauty and the Beast” (the first animated film to receive an Oscar nomination as best picture) and “The Lion King” (now ranking, according to Variety, as having the top box office in any medium with $6.2 billion worldwide). “Maleficent” began as an animated project but then became a live-action epic when a star expressed interest.

“Angelina Jolie said she loved the (title) character,” he recalled. “The (villainous) character (from ‘Sleeping Beauty’) is very glamorous and has horns. What’s not to like?

“She’s really mysterious, though. We were interested in this beautiful character. ‘Sleeping Beauty’ (in which Maleficent was introduced) did not tell us a lot about her.

“She has a question mark when it comes to her personality.”

According to Hahn, Sean Bailey, president of Walt Disney Studios Motion Picture Production, called Jolie to pitch the idea and her interest resulted in a green light.

“We started this project in 2003 as an animated title,” said Hahn, whose other Disney producing credits include “The Emperor’s New Groove,” “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” and Tim Burton’s “Frankenweenie,” as well as the Disneynature environmental documentaries “Earth,” “Oceans,” “African Cats” and “Chimpanzee.”

It went live action as soon as the star smiled upon it.

“Angelina Jolie is beautiful, complex and glamorous, and right now, she’s the consummate mother (with husband Brad Pitt),” he said. (On Nov. 4, the PG-rated title will be released on DVD and Blu-ray Disc.) “We’re endlessly fascinated being told stories about what it’s like to be human and the disconnect with humanity.

“Whether ‘Maleficent’ or the ‘Star Wars’ movies, they are epic tales.”

And part of the popularity of such massive stories results from the comfort they provide to viewers.

“We enjoy being told that the world is complicated and chaotic, and we go to the movies to see there’s a way through it,” he said. “I think that’s what’s so brilliant about storytelling. We need to be told that the world is crazy right now, but it always has been.”

Hahn realizes that making “Maleficent,” directed by debuting filmmaker Robert Stromberg, was risky financially and artistically, but it certainly paid off. According to the Box Office Guru, the movie grossed $756.4 million globally, and the Internet Movie Database pegged its production cost at $180 million.

The executive producer admitted that he was uncertain if audiences would flock to “Maleficent.”

“I don’t think any of us (at the studio) knew how it would do until it came out,” said Hahn, who named “The Jungle Book” and “101 Dalmatians” as his favorite Disney animated titles because he watched them as a child with his parents. “It was risky and complicated because it was telling a story about the goodness in a villain. It could have gone south.

“To be honest, Angelina said, ‘Let’s do something (different).’ She’s becoming a special actress and filmmaker and was willing to wait four years (the live-action production time she spent from inception to completion) for the film to come out.

“What attracted me (as a youngster) to Disney films is that they were so alive. There was heart and emotion and comedy that made them so entertaining.”


Questo è il dettaglio che abbiamo sottolineato sopra:

According to Hahn, Sean Bailey, president of Walt Disney Studios Motion Picture Production, called Jolie to pitch the idea and her interest resulted in a green light. “We started this project in 2003 as an animated title,” said Hahn. It went live action as soon as the star smiled upon it.


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Scissorhands
messaggio 29/10/2014, 14:40
Messaggio #987


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Grande Hahn e completamente d'accordo con lui... neanche a farlo apposta ho scritto le stesse cose poco fa in recensioni XD


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messaggio 5/11/2014, 0:33
Messaggio #988


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Da Collider:

Executive Producer Don Hahn Talks MALEFICENT, Only Considering Angelina Jolie for the Role, Revamping Fairy Tales, WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT?, and More

After being an international hit at the box office, the live-action/fantasy adventure Maleficent, also known as Disney’s most iconic villain, is now available on Blu-ray/DVD and on-demand platforms, with deleted scenes and behind-the-scenes featurettes that will give fans an even deeper glimpse into the magic.

While at the home Walt Disney built on Woking Way in Los Feliz, Calif. in 1932, for an event celebrating Sleeping Beauty and Maleficent, executive producer Don Hahn spoke to a small group of press, which included Collider, about the success of Maleficent and the road it took to the big screen. He talked about how happily surprised he was by the audience reaction, that they never considered anyone other than Angelina Jolie for the role, deciding on the look for the famous villain, whether they ever considered doing this as an animated feature, and why so many people are revamping fairy tales now. He also talked about his involvement with Who Framed Roger Rabbit, just how close they’ve gotten to making a sequel, and why it may just remain one stand-alone film. Check out what he had to say after the jump.

What do you think about the audience reaction to Maleficent?

DON HAHN: To be really honest, I was surprised, in a happy way. I was surprised that it connected with the audience as much as it did, and it connected on a seemingly really deep emotional level, especially with women. It’s a woman’s story, and I think it’s incredibly resonant. That’s not to say it doesn’t cross over to guys. It’s a very emotional movie. It’s a very vulnerable movie, in terms of the performances, and the connection between Angelina [Jolie] and Elle Fanning. You can tell they have a good chemistry off screen that shines on the screen. So, the reaction to it and how deeply felt it is for some people surprised me.

Was anyone other than Angelina Jolie ever considered to play Maleficent?

HAHN: No. It’s one of those rare movies where there wasn’t a list. It was just about her, and she came on really early on. The first person I pitched it to, as a director, was Tim Burton. Even then, she was circling the project. Tim had worked with Linda Woolverton, so we brought her in, as a writer. Eventually, he had some scheduling problems and had to go off and do Sweeney Todd, but she was always circling it. She loves this character, and this character has a lot of layers to it. There’s a facade that this character puts up, that seems very in control, manipulative and able to deal with anything, but as you peel back the layers, you see that beneath that facade is a lot of hurt, anger and vulnerability. The way she plays it, as an actress, is brilliant ‘cause she only shows you those cards when you need to see them. You don’t see the vulnerability until deep into the movie. When she sees the curse can’t be broken and realizes what a horrible mistake she’s made letting out her anger on the daughter of the guy that wronged her, and that the daughter is innocent, you start to see that pain come through in her.

Was Aurora more challenging to cast, or did Elle Fanning come to mind pretty quickly?

HAHN: I think that was probably more of a broad look at who could do it. We’re probably the luckiest people in the world that Elle wanted to do it. This will sound odd, but we always knew that we were making an Angelina Jolie movie, and then we started seeing dailies and we went, “Wow, she’s amazing!” I remember seeing her in Super 8 and going, “Who is that?” Can you imagine being 14 and doing scenes with Angelina Jolie? At 14, I was learning how to speak, and she was holding the screen with Angelina and being a powerhouse. She was a huge boon for this movie.

How did you come to this look for Maleficent?

HAHN: It’s unconventional, and that goes to Robert Stromberg and Angelina who said, “Let’s build a world that this character fits in.” Stromberg is brilliant at that because of his background with Avatar, Alice in Wonderland, and Oz the Great and Powerful, but she fits in that world. The choices they made, in terms of augmenting her cheekbones and things like that, is nutty. You go, “You’re gonna do what?! You’ve hired the most beautiful woman on the planet, and you’re gonna do what?! Okay.” But it works because it’s a caricature and the movie is caricatured and put into a make-believe land, so you can caricature a little bit. It was a very brave choice, but to just put Angelina Jolie in some pretty make-up on screen would have diminished it, a little bit. This made her bigger than life. And then, the horns and everything else were just crazy.

Was the Sleeping Beauty animated feature drawn from, at all?

HAHN: Robert went to the Animation Research Library and looked at all of the artwork because the classic movie is beautiful and the art direction is just amazing. But then, we put that on a low shelf and said, “Okay, that’s inside of us. Let’s go make a movie that’s relevant to a modern audience.” Robert has a real romantic approach to art direction. As a director, he was able to step back and say, “Let’s build a movie and some worlds that tell our story.” The fairy world is all organic with round shapes, water, mist and fog, and the human world is all boxy, iron and stone with spears and spikes. So visually, those worlds compete with each other, even without characters. And then, you put the characters into those worlds and you see that the characters are feuding, but so are the designs, in a good way. It’s really clever, that way. In the way that the best films do, the art direction supports the story, and that’s some of Stromberg’s best work.

Were there any discussions, at any point along the way, of doing this as an animated feature, or was it always going to be live-action?

HAHN: It did start out as an animated idea, briefly, when I was there in feature animation. We love Maleficent. She’s a favorite villain in the parks and the shows they do at Disneyland. We thought, “Can we bring back that character and do an animated film?” So, it was in serious consideration as an animated feature, but pretty quickly migrated over to live-action. That was six or seven years ago. And then, I worked with Sean Bailey, who’s the head of the studio, and that’s when Angelina came in and it started to be really clear that this could be something special, if she attached to the project, and it became clear that live-action would be much more interesting. And then, you’re not competing with the original movie, either, ‘cause why do that? The original movie is there. You can pop it in and look at it, so why make another one? This was a way to expand on that story.

How many times did you have to re-watch Sleeping Beauty?

HAHN: Plenty. It’s a weird movie, if I can say that. They used Tchaikovsky’s score from his ballet. Who does that? Nobody does that anymore. It’s in techno-rama. The art director was crazy about Japanese block printing, so the look of the movie is very angular and very diminished. It’s simple geometric shapes with texture on top, so it’s almost Asian. It’s a very modernist approach to its design. It’s a classic mid-century modern look, laid against this fairy tale. But, it’s a great movie. We didn’t think we could do better, but we thought we could make a movie that was, in its own way, better, being a live-action film. So, you want to take all of that in and absorb it, but then you want to set it aside.

If you go back to the original story, some of the versions of Sleeping Beauty are a little out there. How much did you think about pulling from the darker versions of the story?

HAHN: I don’t know if we consciously thought about darker. We knew that the ‘50s version was very much a ‘50s version. You have a protagonist in the movie that’s sleeping through most of the movie, and is only awakened when her man shows up. So, the story is about, for a woman, life starts when your man shows up. That’s fantastic for 1959, but a horrible message for now. I have a daughter and I have friends, and that’s just inappropriate. So, we knew we had to retell this in a way that’s appropriate. And that’s what fairy tales are.

There’s no set version of Sleeping Beauty or Beauty and the Beast, or any of those. They’re retellings of very, very old stories. So, we felt some courage in going back to it and saying, “Let’s take the theme, which is love’s true kiss, and that can come from anywhere. Even somebody who appears, on the outside, to be the most awful person in the world, can still have this kernel of gold inside, which allows her to love and allows her to break the curse.” That’s the same theme as the original movie. It comes from a different place in this movie, but that’s what Linda Woolverton based the whole story on. And Angelina was all over this story, in a positive way, for those kinds of themes. I think that’s why it connects so well with the audience.

It’s not, “You’ll live happily ever after, someday.” Here’s a very powerful character in Maleficent, who has her wings cut off, which is a metaphor for losing her freedom. She can’t fly anymore, so how strong of a metaphor is that. But, it doesn’t kill her or stop her. She still has to recover from that and have a life. The magic in her comes from a different place now. It doesn’t come from her wings or her sorcery. It comes from her heart, slowly, and her relationship with Aurora. So, that became the story, and that was a leap that we took, early on. We just said, “Let’s all join hands and tell that story, the best we can.” Luckily, the audience was okay with that.

Would you say that it’s a feminist movie?

HAHN: I don’t know. I’m proud of it, as I was with Beauty and the Beast, because it shows women in a more honest light. I think a lot of early tellings of fairy tales, and a lot of movies in Hollywood, in general, either don’t have females in them, or when women are in the movie, they’re portrayed as people who are pretty weak and can’t solve their own problems. That’s the wonderful and terrible thing about movies like Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty. You can’t do anything until your man comes along, and then your life will start. It will start with kids and laundry, but it will start. You can decide whether it’s feminist or not, but I’m happy and very proud of the work that Linda and everyone did on it, to make it with two strong female characters at the head of it. I think it’s wonderful. I think it’s incredibly fresh and entertaining, in a funny way. You think, “Why does it take this long to do a movie like this?” It’s emotional and it’s powerful for everybody.

Was it a risk for Disney to change the story, in this way?

HAHN: If it was a risk, nobody ever stopped us. Nobody ever said, “You can’t do that.” A lot of people asked me if the Disney fans would hate us for doing this. The real legacy of Walt Disney is fearlessness. If you look at his movies, he was fearless about the imagery he put on screen. He made movies for the child in all of us. He wasn’t afraid of dealing with death. He wasn’t afraid of dealing with tough issues. That legacy was the guiding light. We wanted to be fearless about this. We knew that we couldn’t do the, “Your life will start when your man shows up,” story. We wanted to be brave about it, we wanted to be relevant, and we didn’t want to repeat that inappropriate message. That was okay in the 1950s, but none of us believe that, anymore.

Why do you think so many people are revamping fairy tales now?

HAHN: It really is a thing. It’s almost what’s following up all of the Marvel comic genre things, which are still very much alive. They’re age-old stories. If you look at Beauty and the Beast, it’s Cyrano de Bergerac and The Hunchback of Notre Dame and The King and I. It’s been around a long time. Sleeping Beauty is the same way. They’re deep within us, and they have truths about what it’s like to be a human that we don’t completely understand, so we always like to go back to the well again and hear them. And I think we like to hear them in different ways. The way that we did Beauty and the Beast is very different than the way Cocteau did Beauty and the Beast, and thank god. You can still go watch Cocteau, and it’s brilliant. That’s our job as storytellers. You go to the movies to be transported somewhere, and you go to the movies to be reminded of what it’s like to be human, and the trials of being a human being and how you can use that in your life. That’s why these stories resonate, again and again. You can always go back to them. We’ll listen to them, forever.

Having been involved with Roger Rabbit, at any point along the way, did you want there to be a sequel, or are you happy that it’s a stand-alone film?

HAHN: For years, we were sure there would be a sequel. We made cartoons to keep the characters alive, and there’s Toon Town at Disneyland. There were several scripts written. At times, they seemed like they were ready to be greenlit. We did a screening of the movie at The Academy last year, for the 25th anniversary, and Bob Zemeckis and the whole crew was there. We thought, “Maybe this is just one of those movies that’s one of a kind and it’s never going to be sequelized.” It was a perfect storm of people that came together. It was a real analog movie. We drew that thing with pencils. So, it could be that it was just a one of a kind movie. I don’t know. I’m probably too close to it to know. At times, I thought there were great ideas for it. There were ideas popping around about origin stories of where Roger came from. But in the end, it’s probably just going to be one movie.



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Scissorhands
messaggio 19/1/2015, 2:36
Messaggio #989


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Se qualcuno fosse interessato alla prima versione della sceneggiatura e quali cambiamenti siano stati apportati allo script originale (ricordate le reshoots del prologo e i cambio di attrice?), trovate tutto qui.

http://jimhillmedia.com/editor_in_chief1/b...r.Nh6YvWLV.dpbs

Why "Doctor Who" 's Peter Capaldi didn't make the final cut in Disney's "Maleficent"

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Jim Hill
25 Dec 2014 2:07 PM
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Given that Nick Frost already had the beard as well as a Santa Claus-like shape, it probably didn't take all that much behind-the-scenes effort to transform this "Shaun of the Dead" star into Saint Nick for tonight's annual "Doctor Who" Christmas special, "Last Christmas" (which airs on BBC America at 9 / 8 p.m. Central)

Copyright BBC America. All rights reserved

I mean, that brief spritz of white hairspray which Frost had to endured was nothing compared to the six hours that poor Peter Capaldi had to spend in the make-up chair each day while he was working on Disney's "Maleficent."

What's that you say? You don't recall seeing the latest Doctor Who in that Angelina Jolie film? Well, there's a reason for that. Capaldi's character -- King Kinloch (i.e., Maleficent's uncle who also happened to be King of the Fairies) -- was completely cut out of that Robert Stromberg film because, after some tepid test screenings, studio officials decided to give the Mistress of All Evil a very different back story.

To explain: When principal photography of this Joe Roth production began in London back in June of 2012, Maleficent wasn't the sole protector of the Moors. This "Sleeping Beauty" villain was actually a member of the Fairy Court. To be specific, Maleficent was the rebellious teenage niece of Queen Ulla (played by Miranda Richardson) and King Kinloch (Capaldi).

And according to Linda Woolverton's original screenplay for "Malificent," there was little love lost between this gawky teen (And -- yes -- I just used the word "gawky" to describe the teenaged version of Maleficent. There are numerous instances in the First Act of the early version of this script where the Mistress-of-Evil-to-be accidentally bumps into and/or comically knocks over other members of the Fairy Court because she still hasn't quite learned how to control her oversized wings) and her imperious aunt. In fact, it is Ulla who saddles the then-15-year-old Maleficent with her signature look as the Queen hurls a particularly nasty curse at that "... devilish thing" which then causes devil horns to sprout out of her head, proclaiming that "... you will wear these for a hundred years so all can see your true nature."

Peter Capaldi on the red carpet at the 2013
BAFTA TV Awards

Speaking of having to wear things for a long very time, as he worked the red carpet at the 2013 BAFTA TV awards, Capaldi described what it was like to be made up as King Kinloch:

"Well, it's quite weird. You get picked up at half past three in the morning. And you sit in front of the mirror and they start the stuff. And if you have a little itch in your scalp, you know that you're not going to be able to scratch that itch for another 20 hours.

I was in make-up for six hours every day to get these large pointed ears and a pointed nose. Once they're done, you look in the mirror and wonder 'Who is this old guy? He looks sort of like Peter Capaldi except for the pointed ears.'

Then you walk on set and everyone looks at you and says that they think you look great. But you haven't done anything. You're just wearing all this work that everybody else did."

Sam Riley and Angelina Jolie on set during production of Disney's "Maleficent."
Copyright Disney Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved

And the King Kinloch make-up that Academy Award-winner Rick Baker dreamed up must have really been something. Because -- to hear Sam Riley (who played Maleficent's sidekick Diaval in the finished film) tell the story -- Capaldi was virtually unrecognizable once he was transformed into the King of the Fairies:

"I remember on one of the first days, Peter Capaldi and I were chatting and he was starting to have his makeup put on. Then I went off and four hours later this goblin -- or a man with a proper goblin's head, moving and everything with little hairs in his ears -- comes over to me and just carries on the conversation. I was like, 'Is that you, Peter, under there?' "

Well, in spite of what an ordeal it must have been to be made up as the King of the Fairies every day, Capaldi clearly enjoyed his time on the set of "Maleficent." Again from the red carpet at the 2013 BAFTA TV awards:

"I have nothing but nice things to say about this movie. The guy who directing 'Malificent' is the production designer on 'Avatar.' So you can imagine the scale. It has a very magical, dark look and a lot of the film's characters -- Imelda Staunton's, for example -- are computer generated. There's only a handful of us who are real.

And Angelina was absolutely lovely. They had Angelina on wires. She'd come flying in from way over there and land at your feet. It's a big Disney movie with lots of special effects and incredible costumes and make-up. It was great. It was a big, magical, terrific moving story. I'm dying to see it."

Sadly, Capaldi never got to see the version of "Maleficent" where King Kinloch and Queen Ulla were largely responsible for this Disney Villain becoming the Mistress of All Evil. According to what studio insiders have told me about those early work-in-progress screening of this Joe Roth production, test audiences weren't all that entertained by the Fairy Court's intrigues. More to the point, they were puzzled that it took almost 20 minutes of screen time before Angelina Jolie finally made her entrance in this motion picture (India Eisley originally played the teenaged version of Maleficent).

"We spent a bit more time originally in the fairy world before we got into the human side of things," Robert Stromberg admitted during press interviews prior to the May 2014 theatrical release of "Maleficent." "And since we wanted to get Angelina's version of Maleficent on screen sooner as well as get our running time under two hours, we wound up cutting about fifteen minutes out of 'Maleficent' 's first act."

It took eight days of reshoots (during which time, Stromberg was assisted by "Saving Mr. Banks" director John Lee Hancock) to properly retool / rework "Maleficent" 's first act. Replacing all of the previously-shot Fairy Court sequences with brand-new back story scenes that now featured Ella Purnell as the tween version of Maleficent. Who -- instead of being a rebellious halfling (Woolverton's original screenplay strongly insinuated that Maleficent was half fairy / half devil) who was constantly challenging her aunt & uncle -- is now a good-hearted orphan who, all by herself, watches over all of the magical creatures who live out on the Moors.

Copyright Disney Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved

Mind you, it's hard to argue that this was a bad call on Disney's part. Given that the retooled version of "Maleficent" went on to become the third highest-grossing film of 2014. Selling (to date) $757 million worth of tickets worldwide. Not to mention earning an additional $55 million from DVD & Blu-ray sales.

And given that "Maleficent" is now the highest grossing live-action film that Angelina Jolie has ever starred in, it's clear that these late-in-the-game changes that Robert Stromberg, Joe Roth and John Lee Hancock did right by that A-lister. Though Peter Capaldi obviously has a very different opinion on this matter.

And how do I know this? Check out this August 2014 response to a "Doctor Who" fan's question about whether Peter had much experience working on films & TV shows that involved lots of special effects:

"I did quite a lot of green screen acting in the blockbuster movie 'Maleficent' - from which I was cut!"

Copyright Disney Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved

Given that Walt Disney Studios Home Entertainment regularly pulls films from the vault (EX: The diamond edition of "101 Dalmatians." Which is currently scheduled to hit store shelves on February 10, 2015) and then tries to entice consumers to buy yet another copy of that movie by loading up that DVD or Blu-ray with all sorts of extra features like cut scenes ... Well, here's hoping that -- the very next time "Maleficent" is made available to consumers -- WDSHE then tacks on some of the footage that was cut from the original version of this Robert Stromberg film's first act. So that all us "Doctor Who" fans can then finally see what Peter Capaldi looked like in his King of the Fairies garb.


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IryRapunzel
messaggio 19/1/2015, 16:53
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Sì, probabilmente un prologo del genere sarebbe stato di troppo nel film... ma almeno avrebbe spiegato come mai la fata buona si chiama Malefica! Così ha un senso!


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Simba88
messaggio 8/4/2015, 16:38
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CITAZIONE (Logan232 @ 21/9/2014, 13:01) *
Io l'ho rivisto proprio ieri e sono davvero offeso; una messa in scena splendida, un'Angelina Jolie superba, un'ottima regia e poi uno script.. come quello. Che poi fino al maleficio pure pure, ma da quando le tre deficienti portano Aurora nel bosco inizia il delirio puro. Che schifezza.

Lo sto vedendo adesso grazie a Sky poiché non ho mai pensato di andare a vederlo al cinema o in home video.

Concordo su tutto quello che hai scritto, già il maleficio mi è sembrato riuscito a metà (3° dono delle fate buone non espresso e Malefica stessa che "aggiusta il tiro"! blink.gif ). Le fate incompetenti in ogni cosa e Malefica che fa da baby sitter sono semplicemente orripilanti!!
L'ho visto fino all'incontro con Filippo e temo per cosa potrà succedere nel resto del film, che spero di finire di vedere stasera.

L'unica cosa positiva che ho notato è che sebbene io fossi sempre stato abbastanza contrario nel vedere Malefica così pallida rispetto al film originale dove ha la pelle verde, ha la "sguardo verde" quando effettua le magie. Nella scena del sortilegio hanno usato così tanta CGI per il maleficio che sembra davvero che la sua carnagione sia verde!

Ma perché ha (almeno) tre diversi tipi di copricapi? Non potevano farle tenere solo quello della scena del sortilegio? Altra cosa a dir poco stramba.....

E' impressionante poi leggere nel corso del thread i vostri primi commenti tiepidi sulle foto, le esaltazioni per i trailer con i rimandi al Classico, l'arrivo delle prime recensioni negative e poi tutta l'indifferenza (se non addirittura il forte disprezzo) per il film. Infatti ricordo che un anno fa mi stupìì molto di non vedere tanti post sul film.....


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Scrooge McDuck
messaggio 8/4/2015, 18:40
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Simba ma che dici laugh.gif c'è stato un efferato dibattito su Maleficent, penso che pochi altri film Disney abbiano diviso così tanto il fandom tongue.gif e ogni volta che si ritira fuori sto film poi si rischia di incappare nella discussione (anche se non credo avverrà questa volta smile.gif ). Prova nel topic delle recensioni (anche se il "grosso" ricordo di averlo letto su FB).
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Simba88
messaggio 8/4/2015, 21:50
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Ho finito di vederlo; come ho scritto, avevo visto cose parecchio strambe prima, ho continuato a vederle poi: le tre fate che addirittura nemmeno sanno il giorno in cui riportare Aurora al castello), re Stefano che ordina di portare Aurora nella propria stanza, il prurito di Aurora all'indice (mah....), gli arcolai bruciati prima e tenuti nelle segrete del castello per qualche ragione particolare, Malefica a zonzo nel castello.....

Ma nonostante tutto, niente (e dico, niente!!!!) poteva prepararmi a quello che è successo dopo che Filippo ha baciato Aurora!!



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messaggio 9/4/2015, 0:05
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Noi l'abbiamo trovato un bel film, con una premessa difficile ma un bel film.
lo rivediamo tra l'altro volentieri... non capiamo a dir la verità tutte le critiche che sono mosse... secondo noi è tra i migliori live action del listino Disney.


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messaggio 1/9/2018, 12:52
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Visto che nel topic dello Schiaccianoci si è parlato un po' dei costumi del film, mettiamo un'intervista alla costumista di Maleficent.

Leggete l'intervista, ci piace la parte in cui dice che l'incontro tra Malefica e Aurora è stato studiato in modo che la Fata vedesse nella Principessa l'immagine di lei di tanti anni prima quando era una creatura innocente.
C'è stato un lavorone dietro. E si parla anche delle scarpe di Aurora che sono state fatte tutte a mano (oltre che del look della Principessa con il passare delle stagioni).
Chissà se nel sequel metteranno l'abito del Classico… ormai Aurora è adulta nel sequel. Vedremo

Dal sito Vanity Fair:

Maleficent’s Costume Designer on De-Sexualizing Elle Fanning’s Disney Princess


by JULIE MILLER
JUNE 2, 2014 8:30 PM

In retrospect, Disney was sending some sartorial mixed messages about Sleeping Beauty in its eponymous 1959 animated film. In theory, Princess Aurora was cared for—and by extension, dressed by—a trio of eccentric fairies in the forest until the age of 16. But in reality, she was being costumed by Disney’s animation director Marc Davis, who gave the fairy tale teen a chiseled hourglass figure, nary any ounce of baby fat, and the chic style sensibility of Audrey Hepburn.

When it came to adapting Sleeping Beauty for modern audiences with Disney’s live-action retelling, Maleficent, though, Oscar-nominated costume designer Anna B. Sheppard was determined to create a more “down to earth” and natural Princess Aurora. For Elle Fanning, who plays Aurora and was only 14-years-old when she filmed the movie, this meant brainstorming age-appropriate and setting-appropriate designs. “I really walked away from that [animated] image [of Aurora] completely. I wanted something really girly and innocent and also closer to nature.” With those constraints, Aurora’s off-the-shoulder necklines in the original did not make much sense. In fact, Sheppard was so intent on maintaining Aurora’s modesty that she incorporated a conservative layer of chenille under Aurora’s costumes and insisted on sleeves so long that they almost covered her hands.

Instead of the hourglass silhouettes that Davis championed in the original, Sheppard strove for “very long, very fluid, and not sexy at all” shapes to Aurora’s costumes. The designs were not just rooted in chasteness though—Davis spent her pre-production time researching styles of the Renaissance and late-medieval period. Davis incorporated a variety of layers and organic textures (including cotton and thin wools that provided movement whenever the character walked or danced) to Aurora’s costumes, giving her a bohemian style that fits her eclectic upbringing. “When we meet Aurora she lives in the forest and her dresses are probably made by the crazy fairies that we see in the human form. They are very eccentric and full of character. At the same time, Elle has a personality full of light. She is incredibly innocent, she has got this very fair complexion, beautiful hair, and never really needs makeup. I wanted to give her [character] the same light, like she has got in the real life.”

The lightness and loose silhouettes are obvious contrasts to the dramatic look of Angelina Jolie’s character, Maleficent, who is decked out in ink-black leather, blood-red lips, razor-sharp cheekbone prosthetics, and that fantastically horned headpiece—edgy sartorial manifestations of her evil. Fanning, meanwhile, was dressed in organic designs reflective of her unadulterated spirit. “[For Aurora], I wanted to stay away from something that is too modern and too sexy. I didn’t want to create that impression that she is dressed up.” To that point, Sheppard chose to put Aurora in practical footwear—no stilettos for this Disney princess. “She wore all handmade shoes—little booties . . . in the forest, she wears a little ankle, flat boot with lacing up the side that is the same color as her dress.”

Although Aurora and Maleficent are spiritual opposites, Sheppard did link the two in terms of one costume piece. The first time teenage Aurora and Maleficent meet, Fanning’s character is wearing a hooded coat that is nearly a mirror image of the cape Maleficent wore the night she lost her wings and set forth on an evil, destructive path in life. When Maleficent first met Aurora, Sheppard wanted the villainess to briefly be reminded “of the younger, innocent fairy she once was”—not the mistress of all evil that she had become. “So its very similar coloring—of course, Angelina’s was more dramatic and bigger volume. But I wanted the hood because I think it also gives Aurora this little girl look.”

If there is one trademark princess accessory that Aurora is missing, it’s her own headpiece. Not to say that Sheppard did not try her darndest to get a natural variation of the princess tiara on the film’s heroine. “I wanted to put her in [crowns] that she makes herself, like a beautiful wreath. In the weather, it [was made of] berries, nuts, and twigs—and in the summer, it was made of silk, hand-painted flowers.” Alas, “costumes are always kind of by committee. Everyone liked the drawings but when it came time to put the wreathes and crowns on Elle, they thought it was too much. So it got lost in translation.” Asked what happened to her painstakingly-constructed princess crowns, Sheppard sadly guessed that they were laid to indefinite rest in some anonymous L.A. storage facility. Perhaps waiting to be woken up by a more appreciative production team or prince.


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messaggio 1/5/2020, 0:09
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Riportiamo in auge questo topic per via di un'intervista a Don Hahn, il produttore del film, che, seppure molto sinteticamente, racconta un po' alcune cose sul progetto affidato a Tim Burton e poi al taglio dei primi 30 minuti di film in cui si affrontava l'infanzia di Malefica...

Dal sito LaughingPlace:

Angelina Jolie’s Impact on Maleficent

Don Hahn’s first thoughts about adapting Sleeping Beauty as a live-action film wasn’t about who would play the “Mistress of Evil,” but who would direct it. Hot off the success of Alice in Wonderland, Don Hahn thought of his old animation buddy Tim Burton. He brought an original Marc Davis drawing of the character to Burton’s office in London, who seriously considered taking the job for several months. The script was also being written by Linda Woolverton, who also wrote Alice in Wonderland. But ultimately, the film was most impacted by the casting of Angelina Jolie in the title role, who he credits with much of the character’s development and the film’s success. The original film was well over two hours and test audiences were anxious during lengthy backstory with young Maleficent. Over 30-minutes were cut and the narrative was changed to past-tense so it could open with a shot of Angelina Jolie flying, giving audiences what they came to see.


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Fulvio84
messaggio 1/5/2020, 1:37
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Di tutti questi live action credo che soltanto due personaggi si siano piantati nell’immaginario... glenn close come crudelia e angelina jolie come malefica.
Tutto il resto nel dimenticatoio assoluto


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Daydreamer
messaggio 1/5/2020, 5:55
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Non credo sia così Fulvio. Anche Johnny Depp e il suo Cappellaio Matto sono diventati iconici, non c'è parata o sfilata in cui non manchi qualcuno che gli fa omaggio e oggi, ogni volta che si parla del Cappellaio, viene associato al suo personaggio. Pure la Regina Rossa della Bonham-Carter tallona la Regina di Cuori del Classico tuttavia. Anche Will Smith ha caratterizzato molto il suo Genio e vedrai che col sequel lo imporrà ancora di più sull'immaginario del pubblico. E di Gaston/Luke Evans ne vogliamo parlare? Addirittura arriverà lo spin off!
Comunque credo si tratti più di una questione caratteriale del personaggio alla base, che non il divo di per sé, che deve essere sopra le righe e fuori dall'ordinario e non per niente sono praticamente sempre i cattivi...Tuttavia l'accoppiata col divo è fondamentale per suggellare l'impronta del personaggio.
Lady Tremaine è stata interpretata molto bene da Cate Blanchett e anche lei torna spesso nell'iconografia cinematografica...
Nel futuro avranno una loro chance anche Ursula/McCarthy, Crudelia/Emma Stone e sulla carta certamente Ade di Hercules e forse pure la Regina Cattiva di Biancaneve. La Disney, che è sempre attenta a tutto questo, cercherà di agguantarsi grossi nomi, disponibilità permettendo. Forse con Ursula non sono stati molto fortunati, sebbene non mi vengono in mente attori popolari e in voga al momento che avrebbero potuto migliorare il binomio personaggio/divo popolare, forse Lady Gaga (anche se è sempre stato un rumor, non c'è mai stata una proposta ufficiale) ma la McCarthy può sorprenderci, perché è quando meno te lo aspetti che il personaggio poi si impianta ancora di più nel tuo immaginario.


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messaggio 1/5/2020, 11:31
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CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 1/5/2020, 5:55) *
Non credo sia così Fulvio. Anche Johnny Depp e il suo Cappellaio Matto sono diventati iconici, non c'è parata o sfilata in cui non manchi qualcuno che gli fa omaggio e oggi, ogni volta che si parla del Cappellaio, viene associato al suo personaggio. Pure la Regina Rossa della Bonham-Carter tallona la Regina di Cuori del Classico tuttavia. Anche Will Smith ha caratterizzato molto il suo Genio e vedrai che col sequel lo imporrà ancora di più sull'immaginario del pubblico. E di Gaston/Luke Evans ne vogliamo parlare? Addirittura arriverà lo spin off!
Comunque credo si tratti più di una questione caratteriale del personaggio alla base, che non il divo di per sé, che deve essere sopra le righe e fuori dall'ordinario e non per niente sono praticamente sempre i cattivi...Tuttavia l'accoppiata col divo è fondamentale per suggellare l'impronta del personaggio.
Lady Tremaine è stata interpretata molto bene da Cate Blanchett e anche lei torna spesso nell'iconografia cinematografica...
Nel futuro avranno una loro chance anche Ursula/McCarthy, Crudelia/Emma Stone e sulla carta certamente Ade di Hercules e forse pure la Regina Cattiva di Biancaneve. La Disney, che è sempre attenta a tutto questo, cercherà di agguantarsi grossi nomi, disponibilità permettendo. Forse con Ursula non sono stati molto fortunati, sebbene non mi vengono in mente attori popolari e in voga al momento che avrebbero potuto migliorare il binomio personaggio/divo popolare, forse Lady Gaga (anche se è sempre stato un rumor, non c'è mai stata una proposta ufficiale) ma la McCarthy può sorprenderci, perché è quando meno te lo aspetti che il personaggio poi si impianta ancora di più nel tuo immaginario.


Vero forse anche i personaggi di Alice, li avevo dimenticati perche quel film Non mi piace!
Gaston era stupendo e perfetto ma non penso sia così iconico l’attore poi boh vedremo col tempo ma comunque nessuno live action ha preso il posto de classico (per fortuna)


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Daydreamer
messaggio 1/5/2020, 11:50
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Ma infatti mi stupisco ogni volta che qualcuno dice che i live action vogliono sostituire i Classici perché alla Disney credono che siano da svecchiare perché considerati vecchi e superati. Per me è una grande fesseria, i live action oggi sono il miglior lasciapassare e pubblicità tra le nuove generazioni e alla Disney se ne sono accorti naturalmente sin dalla prima ora. Al massimo servono per rilanciare, come si speri capiti per Biancaneve il prima possibile. Praticamente hanno preso il posto delle riedizioni al cinema perché oggi con l'home video la distribuzione è un altro mondo rispetto al passato.


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messaggio 1/5/2020, 12:09
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CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 1/5/2020, 5:55) *
Non credo sia così Fulvio. Anche Johnny Depp e il suo Cappellaio Matto sono diventati iconici, non c'è parata o sfilata in cui non manchi qualcuno che gli fa omaggio e oggi, ogni volta che si parla del Cappellaio, viene associato al suo personaggio. Pure la Regina Rossa della Bonham-Carter tallona la Regina di Cuori del Classico tuttavia. Anche Will Smith ha caratterizzato molto il suo Genio e vedrai che col sequel lo imporrà ancora di più sull'immaginario del pubblico. E di Gaston/Luke Evans ne vogliamo parlare? Addirittura arriverà lo spin off!
Comunque credo si tratti più di una questione caratteriale del personaggio alla base, che non il divo di per sé, che deve essere sopra le righe e fuori dall'ordinario e non per niente sono praticamente sempre i cattivi...Tuttavia l'accoppiata col divo è fondamentale per suggellare l'impronta del personaggio.
Lady Tremaine è stata interpretata molto bene da Cate Blanchett e anche lei torna spesso nell'iconografia cinematografica...
Nel futuro avranno una loro chance anche Ursula/McCarthy, Crudelia/Emma Stone e sulla carta certamente Ade di Hercules e forse pure la Regina Cattiva di Biancaneve. La Disney, che è sempre attenta a tutto questo, cercherà di agguantarsi grossi nomi, disponibilità permettendo. Forse con Ursula non sono stati molto fortunati, sebbene non mi vengono in mente attori popolari e in voga al momento che avrebbero potuto migliorare il binomio personaggio/divo popolare, forse Lady Gaga (anche se è sempre stato un rumor, non c'è mai stata una proposta ufficiale) ma la McCarthy può sorprenderci, perché è quando meno te lo aspetti che il personaggio poi si impianta ancora di più nel tuo immaginario.

Quoto tutto, principalmente ho amato la Blanchett nella parte di Lady Tremaine.


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messaggio 1/5/2020, 23:39
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Crediamo che la Jolie come Malefica si sia imposta maggiormente rispetto agli altri personaggi dei live action, assieme al Cappellaio Matto di Johnny Depp o a Crudelia di Glenn Close perchè sono in fondo i tre protagonisti centrali delle rispettive pellicole (per Alice ricordiamoci che nel 2010 la promozione era molto puntata su Depp/Cappellaio Matto perchè la disney dopo il flop della Principessa e il Ranocchio - film animato - voleva nascondere tutto ciò che era femminile e Depp per Alice live action fu un ottimo richiamo anche per la fama di attira-pubblico che aveva all'epoca, conquistata con la saga dei Pirati dei Caraibi e dei vari film di Burton).

Per gli altri, è giusto omaggiare e come dice Alessio/Daydreamer anche secondo noi la creazione dei live actions non è per sostituire i film animati ma per rendere loro giustizia nell'immaginario popolare (soprattutto extra fans Disney) e invitarli a far riscoprire o anche scoprire il classico da cui sono tratti... per questo speriamo sempre che catalizzino un po' l'attenzione su Biancaneve...


Per quanto riguarda la regia di Burton per Maleficent - Il Segreto della Bella Addormentata... non sappiamo come e se avrebbe dato un'impronta al film, certo sarebbe stato diverso da quello mostrato, forse avrebbe dato un tocco autoriale ma alla fin fine crediamo che sia stato meglio puntare su qualcun altro. Non sappiamo se la Jolie e Burton avrebbero collaborato assieme alla stesura del film... chissà. Era interessato. Sarebbe stato bello sentire le motivazioni del perché non accettò la regia di Maleficent (si parlò di dissapori con la Disney - classici per Burton - ma poi tornò a fare Dumbo...)


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messaggio 1/5/2020, 23:41
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CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 1/5/2020, 5:55) *
Non credo sia così Fulvio. Anche Johnny Depp e il suo Cappellaio Matto sono diventati iconici, non c'è parata o sfilata in cui non manchi qualcuno che gli fa omaggio e oggi, ogni volta che si parla del Cappellaio, viene associato al suo personaggio. Pure la Regina Rossa della Bonham-Carter tallona la Regina di Cuori del Classico tuttavia. Anche Will Smith ha caratterizzato molto il suo Genio e vedrai che col sequel lo imporrà ancora di più sull'immaginario del pubblico. E di Gaston/Luke Evans ne vogliamo parlare? Addirittura arriverà lo spin off!


Angelina-Malefica, Glenn-Crudelia de Mon e i personaggi di Alice in Wonderland sono tutti entrati di diritto nell'immaginario collettivo. Ma il genio di Will Smith e Gaston di Evans, pur ricevendo una buona accoglienza, direi proprio che non hanno lasciato il segno.

Credo che il punto chiave non sia tanto nella popolarità dei grandi antagonisti, quanto nell'insieme di tre elementi fondamentali: personaggio eccentrico/iconico, attore di grandissima fama e film di provenienza memorabile, nel bene o nel male.
Belle interpretata da Emma Watson ha due di queste caratteristiche, ma non è un personaggio eccentrico; il genio di Will Smith sembrerebbe averle tutte e tre, ma il film da cui proviene non è memorabile in quanto davvero troppo vicino al classico animato, cui si sovrappone.

La Crudelia di Emma Stone avrà una grande chance di lasciare il segno.
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messaggio 1/5/2020, 23:50
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Contate poi che la Malefica di Angelina Jolie è molto tormentata, una lettura diversa dal Classico.
La Crudelia di Glenn Close è pazza quanto serve e i personaggi di Alice in Wonderland (Cappellaio Matto su tutti) sono iconici perché strambi, pazzi e "anomali" rispetto alle controparti animate.
Forse anche questo è un aspetto che rende l'idea del perché hanno avuto così presa sul pubblico.

Vedremo come sarà la Crudelia di Emma Stone... secondo noi se l'avessero giocata alla Joker potrebbe uscire fuori una nuova interpretazione della sua "pazzia" o eccentricità


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messaggio 2/5/2020, 0:01
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CITAZIONE (veu @ 1/5/2020, 23:50) *
Vedremo come sarà la Crudelia di Emma Stone... secondo noi se l'avessero giocata alla Joker potrebbe uscire fuori una nuova interpretazione della sua "pazzia" o eccentricità

Oddio, io mi aspetto una cosa stile Il Grinch...Un demonio a causa di un trauma, che alla fine si fa anche comprendere dal pubblico e far voler bene. Ma non credo ci sarà redenzione come per Malefica. Non credo la faranno diventare buona.


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messaggio 2/5/2020, 0:15
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Crudelia con Emma Stone (che condivide lo sceneggiatore con Maleficent - Signora del Male) crediamo non venga resa come buona, magari inizia che lo è e poi diventa cattiva e viene giustificata la sua cattiveria, ma buona non lo è, lo dissero chiaramente. Per questo crediamo che fosse sullo stile di Joker, questi eroi che sono crudeli ma che alla fine parteggi per loro perché la loro crudeltà è giustificata...
Se Maleficent era una sorta di Wicked (come già lo era Frozen), Cruella potrebbe essere una sorta di Joker... non conosciamo Il Grinch, come film non siamo mai riusciti a guardarlo (nè lui nè The Mask che venivano sempre trasmessi più o meno in coppia anni fa)...


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messaggio 15/6/2020, 22:05
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Dal sito Movie Locations:

Maleficent | 2014

LOCATIONS | Hertfordshire; West Sussex
DIRECTOR | Robert Stromberg
CAST | Angelina Jolie, Elle Fanning, Sharlto Copley, Imelda Staunton, Lesley Manville, Juno Temple, Sam Riley, Brenton Thwaites, Kenneth Cranham, Janet McTeer

Robert Stromberg’s revisionist retelling of the Sleeping Beauty story is filmed mainly on sets built at Pinewood Studios in Buckinghamshire – famous as the longtime home of the James Bond movies.

Even a fantasy needs some grounding in reality, and two National Trust properties provide the open countryside.

The enchanted Forest is the Ashridge Estate in Hertfordshire, which fulfilled a similar role in another re-tooled fairy-tale movie, the 2014 musical Into The Woods.

Ashridge is a country estate and stately home in the Chiltern Hills about 2 miles north of Berkhamsted and 20 miles northwest of London.

The estate is comprised of comprises 5,000 acres of woodlands, known as Ashridge Forest, along with commons and chalk downland, currently owned by the National Trust.

The neo-Gothic Ashridge House, currently home to the Ashridge Executive Education program of Hult International Business School, is featured as ‘Marston-Tyne Military Prison’ in Robert Aldrich's 1967 The Dirty Dozen.

Maleficent's beautiful Arcadian Moors are the grounds of the Petworth Estate in the South Downs of West Sussex.

Those hills and vistas are not quite the natural, untamed countryside they seem to be. The 700 acres were carefully fashioned to fit the 18th Century ideal of a rural paradise by famous landscape designer ‘Capability’ Brown.

They provided a favourite subject for painter JMW Turner, who regularly stayed at Petworth House, which is seen in Mike Leigh’s 2014 biopic Mr Turner, starring Timothy Spall.

The Queen (Cate Blanchett) goes riding with Walter Raleigh through Petworth's rolling green hills in Shekhar Kapur’s Elizabeth: The Golden Age, while the chapel of Petworth House is used for the wedding of Redmond Barry to Lady Lyndon in Stanley Kubrick’s 1975 masterpiece Barry Lyndon.


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messaggio 15/6/2020, 22:06
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Qui una serie di ricerche grafiche, artwork e studi sul film (bellissimi!!!):

Click


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