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> Frozen 2, Walt Disney Animation Studios
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messaggio 23/11/2019, 13:41
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Dal sito Hollywood Reporter:

How 'Frozen 2' Tries to Find a New "Let It Go"

After the success of the 2013 film's hit song, the sequel has two massive solo numbers to offer audiences.

[This story contains spoilers for Frozen 2]

You can chalk up the worldwide success of the 2013 Disney animated film Frozen to a lot of factors, from its female-driven story to its comic-relief snowman who loves warm hugs. But more than anything else, what made the film such a hit was its Oscar-winning music, from songwriting team Robert Lopez and Kristen Anderson-Lopez. “Let It Go” became one of the most popular and ubiquitous numbers of the last decade, either within film or just on pop radio. So it’s no surprise that Frozen 2 has songs aplenty, including at least one that’s surely meant to be the new “Let It Go.” A couple of other numbers, however, truly stand out among the rest.

Though the 2019 sequel does introduce a few new characters, voiced by actors like Sterling K. Brown, Martha Plimpton and Jason Ritter, Frozen 2 leaves its songs once again to the voices of its lead actors returning from the original. Actors like Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, Josh Gad, and Kristen Bell all have stage experience — Menzel got a Tony Award for playing Elphaba in Wicked, too — and their lively, energetic performances all help these songs out a good deal. Menzel, after the massive success of “Let It Go,” gets to have two massive solo numbers: “Into the Unknown” and “Show Yourself”.

The former song feels very much like this movie’s attempt at a second “Let It Go,” as Elsa sings out to the wilderness beyond Arendelle, having heard a mysterious voice calling her toward an enchanted forest and her true destiny. Yet “Show Yourself,” Elsa’s solo during a dark journey of the soul wherein she learns more about what that personal destiny is, is a much more powerful song with a better tune and more descriptive lyrics. “Into the Unknown” is catchy, of course (and the fact that rock band Panic! At the Disco was hired to perform a cover of the song that plays during the end credits shows that Disney wants you to remember that song above all else). But “Show Yourself” is a more cathartic tune that impacts our lead character, where “Into the Unknown” is a vaguer version of the classic, Broadway-style “I Want” song best found in The Little Mermaid with Ariel singing about wanting to be “Part of Your World”.

One of the quirky little ironies of the first Frozen is that Groff, a Tony nominee for both Spring Awakening and Hamilton, barely got to do any singing as Kristoff. His only number of note is “Reindeers Are Better Than People,” which Groff sang well and with a requisite amount of charm and humor. But it’s no “Let It Go” or even “For the First Time in Forever.” Mercifully, things have changed in Frozen 2 for Groff, who winds up walking away with — yes, really — the best song in the entire film. On one hand, the subplot featuring Anna and Kristoff is very sitcommy and distracting: Kristoff wants to propose to Anna, but every time he tries to do so, he gets tongue-tied and fails to say what he wants. (Disney animation fanatics may note that this subplot is weirdly similar to one featuring two lovers in The Rescuers Down Under, where a male character tries and fails to propose marriage until the very end.) At one point, because Elsa has gone off on her own, Anna goes as far as leaving Kristoff behind, where the doofy ice salesman is left to stew and sing “Lost in the Woods.”

“Lost in the Woods” is a chance for Lopez and Anderson-Lopez to once again stretch their comedic muscles as songwriters. (Lopez’s first big Broadway hit was Avenue Q, the sly and adult satire of Sesame Street.) Though Kristoff’s love for Anna is real, and his frustration at not being able to put a ring on her finger genuine, “Lost in the Woods” is a hilarious throwback to the power ballads of the 1980s, down to how the song is visualized like a music video that might have featured a hair-metal band doing a slow number. Groff is, of course, an accomplished singer so he’s belting it out no matter what. But the animators get to play around as much as the song itself does, mimicking '80s music-video styling to hilarious effect. It’s a perfect blend of animation and music, with modern flair.

The rest of the songs in Frozen 2 are mostly fine without being truly impressive. (The first film has at least one true clunker, the obnoxious “Fixer Upper” sung by a group of meddling trolls. Frozen 2 fortunately has no such genuinely bad songs.) Though Bell’s a fine singer, Anna doesn’t have nearly as much to do musically; she’s part of an early group number, “Some Things Never Change,” and she gets one solo, the dark “The Next Right Thing.” But unlike the original, Anna feels a little backgrounded musically. Olaf, on the other hand, does not, with the mildly funny “When I Am Older,” another case where the visuals aid the song as much as the performer does. It’s slightly better than Olaf’s solo in the original, “In Summer,” replete with visual humor and an undercurrent of maturity and darkness.

The good news about Frozen 2 is that its songs feel of a piece with what everyone fell in love with six years ago. If, however, you’re looking for a song that’s just as incredible as “Let It Go,” the kind of thing you can sing with your family or just by yourself for years to come, this movie is going to leave you wanting. But that’s only so important — what matters more is that the best of this film’s songs marry well with both the performer and the artists bringing the scenes to life in such a way that, generally speaking, is an improvement. Just don’t go in expecting something quite as iconic as Elsa singing as she walks around a self-created tower of ice.


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messaggio 23/11/2019, 13:47
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Dal sito AnimatedViews:

Frozen II opens

Disney’s Frozen II opens today in 4,440 theatres according to The Numbers. While not as big a hit with the critics as the original, the film is still safely Fresh according to Rotten Tomatoes with 77%. Their consensus: “Frozen II can’t quite recapture the showstopping feel of its predecessor, but it remains a dazzling adventure into the unknown.” Expect an easy opening weekend win, and a huge box office take. The Numbers predicts $125 million while Box Office Mojo says $120 million.


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messaggio 23/11/2019, 13:51
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Dal sito NPR:

Disney Animation Chief Jennifer Lee Is The Queen Behind Elsa And Anna

In a windowless room at Walt Disney Animation Studios in Burbank, Calif., supervising sound editor Odin Benitez plays different sound effects for the creative team of Frozen II. Directors Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck are commenting on the wind sounds.

Wind — like water, air, earth and fire — is important to the story in Frozen II. Playful "Gale," as she's called, swooshes around an enchanted forest carrying with her a flurry of leaves that fly around to flute-like sounds. Angry Gale is loud and gusty and, at times, sounds almost like a "backwards inhale," Lee says approvingly.

As Benitez plays different sounds, Buck and Lee talk about the importance of this anthropomorphic wind. When she's angry, Buck says "she blasts that tree limb away from Anna." When Gale interacts with Elsa, who has the power to make ice and snow, they need a sound that implies Gale is saying "You're the magic," Lee says.

Getting the sound effects for this short scene just right is a team effort, as is every other aspect of an animated Disney movie. "You go shot by shot, moment by moment, frame by frame, and discuss everything from the emotion to the effects to the camera," Lee says.

Lots of make-believe Elsas and Annas are about to finally get their wishes when Frozen II hits theaters this weekend. The first Frozen melted young hearts around the world when it was released in 2013 — up until this year, it was the highest-grossing animated film worldwide. (The 2019 remake of The Lion King now holds the top spot.)

Also remarkable: Jennifer Lee co-directed and wrote the screenplays for both Frozen and Frozen II. She has since been named the chief creative officer of Walt Disney Animation Studios — the first woman to hold such a position.

In search of the secret siren

The first Frozen was inspired by Hans Christian Andersen's 1845 fairy tale "The Snow Queen." For inspiration for the new movie — and to get into the heads of their Nordic characters — Lee and a team from Disney traveled to Norway, Finland and Iceland.

"When we stood on a glacier for the first time, it really hit us: 'What would Elsa feel standing here?' " Lee says. They wondered: How would the natural world respond in Frozen's magical kingdom?

"It's a glacier," Lee says. "It's a thousand feet deep. It's a thousand years old. It's of nature completely. And something [Elsa] would probably be so connected to. And we realized sort of the mythic realm of her power. And that opened up the story to be something even bigger for us."

This being a musical fairy tale, that "something" begins as a "secret siren" that calls to Elsa in "Into the Unknown," a song that requires the full gusto of Idina Menzel's voice.

The sisters Elsa and Anna are older now. Elsa is no longer ashamed of her unusual ability to crystallize the world around her. But she does wonder "why her?" in Frozen II.

Her quest to find out is what thrusts all of the characters, including scene-stealer Olaf the snowman, into a high adventure. Elsa decides to go in search of the secret siren on her own. She tells her sister Anna she can't come along because she doesn't have "powers" to protect her.

Anna reminds her of what happened in the last movie: "I climbed the North Mountain, survived a frozen heart and saved you from my ex-boyfriend, and did it all without powers. So, you know, I'm coming." And she does.

Animation collaboration

Storytelling is serious business at Disney. Teams of writers and directors not only work on their own movies, but also lend a fresh set of eyes and ears to the movies being made by other teams.

This kind of peer-review process is not for everyone, says Clark Spencer, president of Disney Animation. "Not all writers really want to be in a room with a lot of people talking about ideas," Spencer says. "They sometimes want to be in their own room just writing by themselves."

But Spencer says that was not the case with Lee, who first came to Disney in 2011 as a freelance writer. Spencer says she dove right in.

"She just accepted that the story team is in there trying to help build this story," he says. "You've got to keep that vision but listen to the ideas and figure out what is really behind those ideas. 'How is that going to help propel the character forward?' and 'Where do I push back and where do I actually listen and figure out how I'm going to alter where I see the story at this point in time?'" Lee's immediate embrace of Disney Animation's collaborative process "made the entire studio just fall in love with her," Spencer says.

Lee was on the team that made Wreck-It Ralph as well as Zootopia, a socially conscious children's movie about unconscious bias. The Oscar-winning Zootopia became the second Disney Animation movie to cross the $1 billion mark at the global box office.

The first was Frozen — which won two Oscars (animated feature and original song, for "Let It Go" by Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez). Jennifer Lee walked the red carpet with her sister.

Frozen spawned a cottage industry of other products: A best-selling soundtrack, a Broadway show, a ridiculous amount of merchandise, fan videos, and children performing the songs in talent shows around the world. During production, Jennifer Lee says she tried not to think too much about Frozen's intense global fandom.

"If you think about it, it's overwhelming. You almost can't process it," she says.

Trust the process

Lee has had a lot "to process" these past few years. She watched someone she respected, John Lasseter, get forced out of Disney over allegations of sexual misconduct. Lee says Lasseter was instrumental in putting her on Frozen after he saw how well she connected to the team developing the movie.

"As a woman, the kind of princess I always felt we needed, in terms of the strength and the messiness and the quirkiness, the lack of grace some of us have ... that resonated," Lee says. "And [Lasseter] saw that and brought me into that team."

Lasseter's legacy at Disney is complicated. There had been rumors of his alleged misconduct, but he was also considered a visionary.

"It's an adjustment," Lee says. "It's all overwhelming at times. But we have all these films that needed to move forward. And what we all did — which became a model for me — is: we got together ... as directors and as producers and said 'What do we see for the studio?' 'What are the things we need to do going forward?' 'What would we like to do?'

"What we tried to say all the time is 'the work' ... 'Go to the work.' And we did," she says.

When Lee was named Disney Animation's new creative officer, Walt Disney Studios Chairman Alan Horn said that with Frozen, she brought a "new and exciting perspective" to the company.

Lee grew up in Rhode Island. She thinks some of her mental toughness comes from being raised by a single mom, a nurse who worked three jobs. Lee remembers being bullied and taking comfort in stories. One of her favorites was Cinderella.

"I think the biggest thing for me was her being mistreated so much, but being able to say 'it's not you, it's them' and hold on to her strength," Lee says.

In her new role overseeing teams of Disney Animation writers and directors, Lee says she wants to push both storytelling and the art form of animation forward. What will not change, she says, is the role of fairy tales in children's lives.

"We're going to take you a little bit into scary places ... and notions of things that you are uncomfortable with to help you cope in real life," Lee says. "But we're always going to bring you back to a safe place."

Nina Gregory edited this story.


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messaggio 23/11/2019, 18:15
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Dal sito Hollywood Reporter:

Box Office: 'Frozen 2' Ends November Cold Snap, Heads for Record $110M-$120M U.S. Debut

The early Thanksgiving tentpole skated to a huge $41.8 million on Friday even with kids still in school.
Walt Disney Animation Studios' Frozen 2 is ending the cold snap at the November box office, where it's on course for a record U.S. debut of $110 million to $120 million.

It would be the best-ever opening for an animated pic launching outside of summer, and one of the top five starts ever for any animated title, not adjusted for inflation. Friday's queenly haul of $41.8 million includes $8.5 million in Thursday night previews.

The first Frozen, which opened domestically the Wednesday before Thanksgiving in 2013, set a holiday animated record with a five-day gross of $93 million, including $67 million for the three-day weekend. It went on to earn $1.28 billion at the global box office to become the top-grossing animated film of all time, not adjusted for inflation.

The November box office could use some good news. Through Thursday, ticket sales for the month were running 27 percent behind last year following such misses as Terminator: Dark Fate and Doctor Sleep. The strength of Frozen 2 should help to narrow the year-over-year deficit of 6 percent.

Frozen 2 is also off to a red-hot start overseas, where it should easily skate past the $150 million mark this weekend after earning $18.6 million in its first two days from a handful of countries. The movie is opening in a total of 26 markets, including major territories China, South Korea, France, Germany and Japan, where the 2013 Frozen grossed a historic $249 million.

In Frozen 2, Kristen Bell (Princess Anna) and Idina Menzel (Queen Elsa) reprise their beloved roles. The gang from the original movie will embark on a new journey that goes beyond their homeland of Arendelle, and this time Anna will be joining Elsa on the adventure.

Jonathan Groff, Josh Gad and Santino Fontana also return from the first film, while new castmembers include Evan Rachel Wood and Sterling K. Brown. Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee also return as co-directors.

The sequel earned an A- from audiences, compared to an A+ for Frozen. Reviewers also liked it less.

Elsewhere, Sony's A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood, starring Tom Hanks as the late Fred Rogers, started off with an estimated $4.5 million on Friday for an projected debut of $13 million to $14 million, in line with expectations.

Marielle Heller directed the critically acclaimed, which isn't a biopic or traditional biographical drama. Instead the feel-good movie traces the real-life friendship between journalist Lloyd Vogel (Matthew Rhys) and Rogers.

Receiving an A CinemaScore, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood looks to come in behind holdover Ford v Ferrari, which is driving toward a second-place finish in its sophomore outing with a gross in the $15 million range. Both Ford v Ferrari and Beautiful Day are competing for older audiences.

The Russo brothers-produced 21 Bridges, a cop thriller starring Chadwick Boseman, is expected to follow in fourth place with $9 million to $10 million, also in line with expectations.

From STXfilms, MWM Studios and Huayi Brothers Pictures, the R-rated pic is challenged by mediocre reviews. Audiences gave it a B+ CinemaScore.

Frozen 2, A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood and 21 Bridges are all positioned to take advantage of the lucrative Thanksgiving box office corridor. On Nov. 27, two other holiday offerings will enter the fray: Knives Out and Queen & Slim.

At the specialty box office, Todd Haynes' Dark Waters is on course for a so-so opening location weekend average in the $27,000 range from four theaters in New York and Los Angeles . Mark Ruffalo, Anne Hathaway and Tim Robbins star in the well-reviewed whistleblower drama.

Nov. 23, 7:30 a.m. Updated with Friday grosses and revised weekend estimates.


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LaBestia
messaggio 24/11/2019, 0:12
Messaggio #485


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CITAZIONE (Logan232 @ 20/11/2019, 23:23) *
La Disney potrebbe affidare i testi italiani dei film Disney a Franco Travaglio che già fa un lavoro splendido coi musical. Ecco, paragonate i testi italiani delle Brancucci a quelli di Travaglio e ditemi se sono anche minimamente allo stesso livello.

Ma io so che prima o poi le cose cambieranno. Non può piovere per sempre (cit.)


Sono d'accordo su tutto ma se i Brancucci hanno poltrona fissa è perché la Disney americana e italiana glie lo permettono. È tutta una questione di equilibri di potere, come del resto in ogni ambito lavorativo.
Vi ricordo che dopo Il re Leone cambiarono i vertici nella supervisione artistica e fu chiamato Michele Centonze, reduce del successo con Jovanotti e Pavarotti&friends. Centonze inizialmente si occupò dei dialoghi affiancato da Fabrizio Cardosa alla direzione musicale (in Pocahontas) per poi assumere pieno ruolo per la parte musicale. Sfido chiunque a dire che il suo lavoro in Hercules e nel Gobbo di Notre Dame non sia stupendo. Poi vabbè, con Tarzan ci fu il grande ritorno di Roberto Morville alla supervisione. Amico dei Brancucci, ha sancito il loro grande ritorno. E il resto della storia la conosciamo.
Morale della favola: i Brancucci staranno lì finché il direttore artistico italiano lo deciderà (e vale dire ancora a lungo visto che l'attuale direttrice, Lavinia Fenu, sembra soddisfatta del loro lavoro). L'america non dirà niente: per gli americani basta che le voci italiane siano coerenti alle originali, possibilmente conosciute, e che i testi delle canzoni siano più o meno simili. Nessun problema se vengono aggiunte sillabe in più forzando la melodia.

Messaggio modificato da LaBestia il 24/11/2019, 0:15


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.... chi avrebbe mai potuto amare...
.....una BESTIA?
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messaggio 24/11/2019, 4:02
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CITAZIONE (Logan232 @ 20/11/2019, 23:23) *
Sui social le idolatrano tutti perchè negli anni i Brancucci hanno costruito un vero e proprio monopolio del doppiaggio cantato che, per fortuna, sta venendo messo alla prova sempre più spesso da altri concorrenti. Tutti vorrebbero lavorare in un film Disney e, pur sapendo che le Brancucci Sisters non sono brave nel proprio lavoro, gli fanno tutti buon viso a cattivo gioco altrimenti babbo Ernesto ci mette una cattiva parola e tanti direttori, doppiatori e aspiranti tali possono dire addio alla possibilità di lavorare con la Disney. E' una triste realtà, ma c'è un gioco omertoso: per i corridoi del doppiaggio, dove tutti sparlano di tutti è vero, alle Brancucci gliene si dicono di ogni perchè, voglio dire, il risultato lo sentono tutti e non è bello. Non lo è. Le canzoni adattate dalle sorelle sono penose. Tutte. Riconosco anche io che di tanto qualcosa l'azzeccano, ma sembra di stare appresso ad un bambino di prima elementare che sta imparando a leggere e scrivere e quindi ad esultare per ogni piccolo passo aspettandoci però il disastro dietro l'angolo. Queste donne, che poi sono persone dolcissime eh, molto gentili e solari glielo riconosco, sono 10 anni che si dedicano a tempo pieno a questo lavoro, avendo lasciato gli impieghi per cui avevano studiato e si erano laureate, eppure continuano a sbagliare. In italiano i pezzi dei film Disney sono atroci. E prima per il sync che sembra lo hanno scoperto loro che nel doppiaggio bisogna seguire il labiale degli attori, poi perchè i film sono per lo più per bambini quindi bisogna addolcirli e poi perchè gli mandano i talent incapaci. Ma quante scuse devono accampare?


Quanto è triste e quanto fa arrabbiare tutto ciò che dici. Vi giuro, a me a causa di tutta questa storia viene un nervoso immane.
È proprio vero che anche quando i testi hanno una parvenza di decenza, è quella modalità da sigla dei puffi che ti fa rivoltare lo stomaco, e sono certo che non sia una scelta dei cantanti ma una cosa che gli viene imposta. Ma del resto, che la Brancucci (o "Le Brancucci", apprendo solo ora che ce ne sia anche una seconda) pensasse che i Disney siano roba per bambini già la sapevamo, eppure non ci si abitua mai.

Poi sta cosa dei commenti l'ho notata anche io, specialmente su Youtube. Ne ho trovato una marea che dicono tipo "io non ne capisco nulla, ma..." e poi si addentrano nella questione con termini tecnici e lodi alla Brancucci che fanno capire che sono persone ben informate, altro che. Mi fanno ridere, perché si capisce lontano un miglio che sono commenti falsi come una banconota da due euro. Che siano gli allievi della sua famosissima "Accademia di storpiamento dei testi a favore del santo labiale", a parlare? Non mi stupirebbe. Comunque altro che Travaglio ragazzi, quelle rimarranno lì fino alla fine dei tempi, e dopo di loro subentrerà chi sceglieranno loro stesse. Questa è l'Italia.

Io sono contento di trovarmi all'estero e di vedermi anche stavolta, come accadde col primo Frozen, il film in lingua originale. Anche perché al contrario di molti di voi io ho sempre pensato che il primo errore con Frozen fosse nella scelta dei doppiatori. E questo non solo per le scarse capacità di doppiaggio delle due Serena (e parlo di doppiaggio, perché ad esempio ho adorato l'interpretazione della Rossi nel film su Mia Martini), ma proprio come colore delle voci: troppo "matura" (per essere gentili) l'Autieri, che ce la vedrei a doppiare una donna di 40-45 anni, e non una ragazza di 21, e troppo scura e ombrosa la Rossi che entra in contrasto con la voce della Bell che invece è molto dolce.

Ma vabbé, è una battaglia contro i mulini a vento.
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messaggio 26/11/2019, 0:52
Messaggio #487


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Dal sito Animated Views:

Frozen II lets it go to record-breaking $350 million global opening

Queen Elsa reigned supreme as Frozen II enjoyed the biggest global opening ever for an animated movie, The Numbers is reporting. With a worldwide premiere of $350 million, it beat the record set by Toy Story 4 earlier this year by more than $100 million. Additionally, Frozen II also gave Disney Feature Animation their first $100 million+ opening in the states, earning $127 million. It’s worth noting that the biggest Disney Feature Animation opening prior to this weekend was Zootopia back in 2016 with $75 million.

Frozen II’s stateside take also gave it the third biggest debut for an animated feature ever, behind only Finding Dory ($130 million) and Incredibles 2 ($180 million), and both of those films had the benefit of opening during the summer when kids are off from school on Fridays. And there’s still a slight chance that Anna and Elsa could eclipse Dory once actuals come in tomorrow afternoon.

What went right here? First and foremost, Disney ran a great marketing campaign, promoting Frozen II has an epic event film with a teaser which launched in February. And, of course, there was very little chance that a sequel to Frozen wasn’t going to be a hit, given that it’s still the biggest animated movie ever at $1.2 billion worldwide (we won’t count the new Lion King). Though it didn’t score quite as high with critics as the original (with some taking issue with the sequel’s abundant use of supernatural elements), Frozen II was still warmly received for the most part when it came to reviews, and the CinemaScore is also quite favorable at “A-” vs. the “A+” the first movie got.

Making things even more promising for Frozen II is that it’s all but guaranteed to lead the box office for the next two weekends. Wednesday kicks off the five-day Thanksgiving holiday, which is almost always generous to Disney, and the following week brings Playmobil: The Movie, which so far at least has been tracking very poorly.

Final figures are due tomorrow.


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messaggio 26/11/2019, 0:54
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Dal sito Variety:

‘Frozen 2’ Box Office: How Disney Came to Rule Thanksgiving

Disney bucked box office tradition this year, opting for the first time since 2014 not to release a movie the Wednesday before Thanksgiving.

But that doesn’t mean the studio won’t still gobble up the competition around Turkey Day. Disney unveiled “Frozen 2,” which debuted to a stellar $130 million in North America, a week earlier than the traditional holiday release. It’s a strategic move that Lionsgate and Warner Bros. previously deployed with “Hunger Games: Catching Fire” and “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” two of the highest-grossing Thanksgiving releases ever.

Like those offerings, “Frozen 2” should power an impressive sophomore outing during a time when young kids are out of school and parents are off from work.

“Hunger Games: Catching Fire” still holds the record for the biggest Thanksgiving haul for its second weekend in theaters, when it generated $109 million between Wednesday and Sunday in 2013. But since then, Disney has slowly tightened its dominance during a period that’s already spent with kin.


“Disney is synonymous with family and has been for a very long time,” said Jeff Bock, a box office analyst with Exhibitor Relations. “Any time Disney puts their magic seal of approval, especially around holidays, families will show up en masse.”

Dating all the way back to the late 1990s, Disney has ruled the holiday with classics like “Toy Story” (1995), “101 Dalmatians” (1996), “Flubber” (1997), “102 Dalmatians” and “Unbreakable” (2000). But even more so over the past half a decade, Thanksgiving has become a steadfast frame to launch all-audience offerings with “Frozen” in 2013, “The Good Dinosaur” in 2015, “Coco” in 2017 and “Ralph Breaks the Internet” in 2018. Major franchises like “Hunger Games,” “Twilight” and “Harry Potter” have all made major impacts, but most of Disney’s Thanksgiving titles (with the exception of “Frozen 2” and “Ralph Breaks the Internet”) are originals that don’t come with the benefit of built-in fanbases.

When it comes to movies that launched directly ahead of Thanksgiving, Disney has slowly come to dominate the biggest opening weekends. Just look at these launches: “Frozen” ($93.6 million in 2013), “Ralph Breaks the Internet” ($84.7 million), “Moana” ($82.1 million), “Toy Story 2” ($80.1 million), “Coco” ($72.9 million), “Tangled” ($68.7 million) and “The Good Dinosaur” ($55.4 million).

“Frozen 2” arrived six years after the original with outsized expectations since its predecessor is still the highest-grossing animated movie in history, generating $1.3 billion worldwide. In recent weeks, the box office has seen the quick demise of a succession of sequels, spinoffs and remakes like “Terminator: Dark Fate,” “Doctor Sleep” and “Charlie’s Angels.” But “Frozen” avoided a similar fate, mainly because it was an installment that audiences deemed worthy. Without much competition at multiplexes — this weekend’s new offerings, Rian Johnson’s murder mystery “Knives Out” and Universal’s modern day Bonnie and Clyde “Queen and Slim,” likely won’t be drawing younger audiences — “Frozen 2” should sweep again at theaters.


“‘Frozen 2’ is just going to slay again this week,” Bock said. “There’s really nothing to compete with it until ‘Jumanji’ and then ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker.'”

This year’s box office boost couldn’t come at a better time. After a slumbering fall that saw domestic receipts plunge over 7% from 2018, multiplexes needed a return visit from Princesses Elsa and Anna. Box office prognosticators remain optimistic that a variety of offerings can help turn fortunes around.

“Thanksgiving to New Year’s accounts for roughly 17 to 20% of the entire year’s box office,” said Paul Dergarabedian, a senior media analyst with Comscore. “It’s a really important time because a lot of ground can be made up.”


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messaggio 28/11/2019, 1:08
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Articolo sulle canzoni del film:

Da Hollywood Reporter:

'Frozen 2' Songwriters on Creating New Music Magic for Anna and Elsa

Oscar winners Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Bobby Lopez wrote seven new songs, ranging from the fun '80s homage "Lost in the Woods" to the powerful ballad "Into the Unknown," for the new film.

Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Bobby Lopez’s list of accomplishments as a couple includes 16 years of marriage, two daughters, two Oscars and two Grammy Awards. While they’ve been collaborating for years, their career hit a new level after the breakout success of Frozen and the ballad "Let It Go" (for which they won their first Oscar). For the sequel, the pair wrote seven new songs, ranging from the fun ’80s homage "Lost in the Woods" to the powerful ballad "Into the Unknown."

What were your first thoughts when it came to your approach on the sequel?

BOBBY LOPEZ It all starts with story. We got a call from [directors] Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck, who pitched us the basic idea behind what would become the story. It was all about the idea that the two most important days of your life are the day you’re born and the day you find out why.

KRISTEN ANDERSON-LOPEZ We didn’t really write any music right away, but we knew that the potential was there for a lot of depth and a lot of emotion. Jen took two days of therapy, full Myers-Briggs assessments as each of the characters, to sort of see what they still needed to learn. We all took research trips to Norway and Iceland and Alaska.

LOPEZ We went to Alaska to see a glacier.

ANDERSON-LOPEZ We got to walk on a glacier just to feel how ancient and powerful [it was], and that sense of memory that exists in all that ice.

Tell me about the mysterious lullaby "All Is Found."

ANDERSON-LOPEZ That was the first song we wrote. We looked at "Rock-a-Bye Baby." We also looked at Norwegian lullabies that all feel like they’re sung in a misty forest just as the sun is going down.

Which of these songs was the hardest to write?

LOPEZ The biggest story moment was definitely "Show Yourself." We knew this was the end of Elsa’s journey, and we were a little vague on what exactly happened when she got there — and we’re going to keep it vague because we don’t want to give too much away of the story. But suffice to say, the first draft of "Show Yourself" was completely different than what ended up in the movie. It was longer, it had a different feel, it had a different ending —

ANDERSON-LOPEZ The chorus was the same.

LOPEZ The chorus had the same title, let’s put it that way. And it had a different middle. And everyone loved it, but we had to shape it. When we saw the first round of visuals and then we saw it in the film, everyone agreed changes needed to happen. And it went back and forth for months — it’s now four minutes and 20 seconds and it has a big ending. It transformed a lot, and it was hard.

Olaf has a number about understanding things later in life, "When I’m Older." What was the inspiration behind that one?

ANDERSON-LOPEZ It really came out of a mantra we were using at the time, sort of a self-soothing mantra to ourselves. When you’re working on these original musicals there are moments that you really understand — there are some things that are clear. But there’s so much that’s unclear and shifting, and one day you think a song is in the movie and then you turn around and it’s gone. And we kept saying, "This will all make sense six months from now. Six months from now, we won’t be dealing with this amount of flux." And I was actually ice skating in Prospect Park to try and bring my stress down and I realized, "Ah, we can take all this that I’m feeling and make that Olaf’s mantra." But I do think, just to speak to a deeper message, the whole movie is about growing and finding where you belong, and you can’t do that unless you step into the unknown, unless you take risks. But when you do that, you also need to be able to say, "It’s gonna be OK. I’m OK with not knowing right now. I’m OK with this feeling of incompetence, because one day I’m going to know it." I think that’s a big part of allowing ourselves to risk.

Jonathan Groff gets a big musical number with "Lost in the Woods," which channels '80s glam rock.

LOPEZ One of the things that everyone agreed was that in Frozen, Jonathan did not have enough to sing. The guy has pipes of gold, and we just sort of let them lie. So we wanted to get to this idea of a guy who is very much used to repressing his feelings, probably from childhood,suddenly feeling them all in one big ’80s power ballad. So that it would be funny but also, you know, a little emotional too. Maybe too emotional.

ANDERSON-LOPEZ And also, reindeers in harmony. Bobby and I were both in a cappella groups, and so whenever possible, the great joy of our process is putting vocals and vocal harmonies in our demos.


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Scrooge McDuck
messaggio 29/11/2019, 18:40
Messaggio #490


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Parlandone tra di noi in modo molto spiccio come fossero le chiacchiere da bar, assodato che agli Oscar la Disney proporrà Into the Unkow, non pensate anche voi che Show yourself sia molto più potente, sia per il testo, per il significato e per il momento del film?
Anche parlando con chi ha visto Frozen 2 sento dire che è la canzone e il momento che hanno preferito...

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messaggio 29/11/2019, 23:49
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CITAZIONE (Logan232 @ 21/11/2019, 0:23) *
Sui social le idolatrano tutti perchè negli anni i Brancucci hanno costruito un vero e proprio monopolio del doppiaggio cantato che, per fortuna, sta venendo messo alla prova sempre più spesso da altri concorrenti.
Dici? Non mi pare proprio... unsure.gif

CITAZIONE (LaBestia @ 24/11/2019, 0:12) *
Sfido chiunque a dire che il suo lavoro in Hercules e nel Gobbo di Notre Dame non sia stupendo.
Sfida accettata. Hercules è forse il meno peggio, ma, oltre alle sillabe aggiunte, alle rime mancanti o messe a caso, il problema di Centonze è che era proprio sgrammaticato. Mulan, a mio parere, è il suo risultato peggiore.

CITAZIONE (LaBestia @ 24/11/2019, 0:12) *
Centonze inizialmente si occupò dei dialoghi affiancato da Fabrizio Cardosa alla direzione musicale (in Pocahontas) per poi assumere pieno ruolo per la parte musicale. .... Poi vabbè, con Tarzan ci fu il grande ritorno di Roberto Morville alla supervisione. Amico dei Brancucci, ha sancito il loro grande ritorno.
Non so se ho frainteso o se hai fatto confusione. Centonze non curò i dialoghi di Pocahontas e i Brancucci non tornarono con Tarzan.

CITAZIONE (LaBestia @ 24/11/2019, 0:12) *
i Brancucci staranno lì finché il direttore artistico italiano lo deciderà (e vale dire ancora a lungo visto che l'attuale direttrice, Lavinia Fenu, sembra soddisfatta del loro lavoro). L'america non dirà niente: per gli americani basta che le voci italiane siano coerenti alle originali, possibilmente conosciute, e che i testi delle canzoni siano più o meno simili. Nessun problema se vengono aggiunte sillabe in più forzando la melodia.
Ma... la butto lì.. Farci sentire noi dalla Lavinia Fenu?

CITAZIONE (Scrooge McDuck @ 29/11/2019, 18:40) *
assodato che agli Oscar la Disney proporrà Into the Unkow, non pensate anche voi che Show yourself sia molto più potente, sia per il testo, per il significato e per il momento del film?
Mah, vi dirò che le canzoni di Frozen II mi hanno lasciata piuttosto indifferente, tranne la ninna nanna e la canzone di Kristoff. Dovrei dilungarmi in spoiler per argomentare, ma io l'ho trovato musicalmente noioso e poco vario.


Messaggio modificato da CostanzaM il 29/11/2019, 23:57
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messaggio 30/11/2019, 0:21
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Anche per me Show Yourself è il pezzo forte di questo film, molto più di Into the Unknown e la ritengo la Let it Go del sequel. Ma nessuna canzone raggiunge la meraviglia della scena in cui Elsa costruisce il palazzo di ghiaccio e si scioglie la treccia in Frozen 1. Riguardo la versione italiana, io vedo un certo miglioramento rispetto a lavori precedenti sinceramente. Anche da un punto di vista del doppiaggio, la Autieri è migliorata molto (nel primo film non è stata il massimo nelle parti parlate). Secondo me i vari corti, telefilm etc. le hanno permesso di crescere da quel punto di vista.
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messaggio 30/11/2019, 1:17
Messaggio #493


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Dal sito Variety:

‘Frozen 2’ Stars Talk Possible $100 Million Debut, Which Disney Princess Could Be Bisexual (Watch)

Welcome to a special edition of “The Big Ticket,” Variety and iHeart’s movie podcast.

I’m calling it “Frozen 2” Day because the new episode features interviews with the stars of the Disney sequel, Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Josh Gad, Jonathan Groff and Evan Rachel Wood as well as co-directors Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck and producer Peter Del Vecho.

Here are some of the highlights…

Kristen Bell says “Frozen’s” impact goes way beyond what kids get out of it. “There have been numerous times that people in our team have heard of adults being in a really low place and said, ‘I was considering suicide, and I saw “Frozen” and I realized I can be me,’” she said.

Bell’s new show for Disney Plus, “Encore,” reunites former high school theater club members to perform their school musical. “There’s so few things that unite us all, but you say the words ‘high school’ to anyone on the planet, and they get a pit in their stomach and they feel like they’re going to puke, because high school is traumatic,” she said. “To come back, it’s like time travel and people make amends, people say things they wish they had said, people tell their stories: ‘I behaved like a bully because this was happening to me.’ You watch human connection happen right in front of you. People come out of the closet. It’s beautiful to watch, and it’s one of the things I’m most proud of.”

Idina Menzel knows Ariana Grande would love to play Elphaba in the movie adaptation of “Wicked,” but she still wants to do the film after having won a Tony for her work as the iconic witch back in 2004. “I still think that I should be Elphaba and I should just show up, slap that green makeup on me and get some CGI and Benjamin Button the s— out of that,” Menzel laughed, adding, “I mean I love you, Ariana, but I still am relevant here.”

Menzel also says she’s ashamed to admit it but she recently tried to use her “Frozen” fame with a doctor’s receptionist to get her son in earlier than their scheduled appointment. “I was like, I don’t know, you know, I’m an actress and I have to get to this premiere tonight. ‘Do you have any daughters? It’s called “Frozen” and I sing “Let It Go,”’” she said.

The receptionist wasn’t impressed: “She actually didn’t give a s— and that teaches me a lesson.”

Josh Gad participated in an early reading of “Frozen” when it was called “Anna and the Snow Queen” with Jason Biggs, Megan Mullaly and Ginnifer Goodwin. Even so, he still had to audition to play Olaf in the movie. His audition song? “You’ve Got a Friend in Me.”

Jonathan Groff recorded a song Kristen Anderson-Lopez and Bobby Lopez wrote for him for “Frozen 2” after he didn’t get the chance to sing in the first movie, but the tune got cut. “I was like, ‘Oh, okay, they tried. It didn’t work. I totally get it. It’s completely fine,’” Groff recalled.

Then they wrote him another song, “Lost in the Woods,” which did make it into the movie.

There’s been a lot of talk on social media about Elsa getting a girlfriend one day. LGBTQ fans love to dissect animated Disney films for any hints of queer themes, storylines or characters. I asked Evan Rachel Wood, who came out as bisexual eight years ago, if she thinks an animated Disney film will ever feature a lead character who is queer. She laughed, “I’m still not convinced that we haven’t already with Mulan and Hercules. Honestly, Mulan is still up for debate. I think there’s a little bi-energy going on there.”

“Frozen 2” co-director and chief creative officer of Walt Disney Animation Studios Jennifer Lee says an LGBTQ lead character isn’t out of the question. “I mean there are no limits to the characters we can have,” she said.

You can listen to all the “Frozen 2” interviews below. You can also find “The Big Ticket” at iHeartRadio or wherever you listen to your favorite podcasts.



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messaggio 1/12/2019, 21:10
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Dal sito Box Office Mojo:

All Releases
DOMESTIC (38.9%)
$287,573,344
INTERNATIONAL (61.1%)
$451,000,000
WORLDWIDE
$738,573,344


In soli 12 giorni Frozen 2 è a quota 739 milioni di incasso nel mondo.

E ha già superato l'incasso globale del suo predecessore (Frozen 1) in ben 11 mercati, tra cui uno dei più importanti, la Cina.


Dal sito The Disinsider:

‘Frozen 2’ Crosses $725 Million At The Worldwide Box Office

Despite new releases at this week’s box office including the Rian Johnson (The Last Jedi) Mystery Thriller Knives Out and Queen & Slim, Walt Disney Animations Frozen 2 was able to maintain the top spot for a second week in a row.

Frozen 2 earned a record-shattering $123.7 million for the Wednesday-Sunday holiday stretch, easily beating the $109.9 million grossed by The Hunger Games: Catching Fire in 2013. The sequel also marked the best Thanksgiving showing ever for a Disney animated film after besting the first Frozen, which earned $93.7 million for the five days in 2013.

Frozen 2 finished Sunday with a domestic total of $287.6 million and an astonishing $738.6 million globally, including a second weekend foreign gross of $163.8 million. The sequel has already surpassed the total lifetime gross of Frozen in 11 markets, including China, where it has earned a huge $90.5 million to date.

Also, Ford v Ferrari, from Fox/Disney, placed third with $19 million for a domestic total of $81 million and $143.3 million globally. The film is garnering quite a bit of awards buzz.




Dal sito Variety:

‘Frozen 2’ Enchants International Box Office Again With $164 Million

Disney royals Anna and Elsa maintained their reign over international box office charts as “Frozen 2” generated another $164 million from 45 foreign territories over the weekend.

The animated sequel debuted in a handful of overseas markets this weekend including Italy ($7.7 million), Australia ($6.6 million) and Russia ($13.7 million), where it now stands as the biggest animated opening weekend of all time. Globally, “Frozen 2” has earned a mighty $739 million in just 12 days of release and should become the sixth Disney movie this year to cross $1 billion at the worldwide box office.

Adding to its slew of box office records, “Frozen 2” is already the highest-grossing animated movie in history in Indonesia and the Philippines. It also surpassed the lifetime haul of its predecessor in 11 territories including China ($90.5 million). Other top markets include Korea ($61.2 million), Japan ($38.3 million) and the United Kingdom ($35 million)

New to movie theaters this weekend, Lionsgate’s “Knives Out,” a murder mystery starring Daniel Craig, Jamie Lee Curtis and Chris Evans, carved up $28.3 million overseas, boasting strong showings in China, the U.K., Russia and Australia. The whodunit directed by Rian Johnson kicked off with $41.7 million in North America for a promising global start of $70 million. It cost $40 million to produce.

Elsewhere, Disney-Fox’s “Ford v Ferrari” amassed $10.2 million from 48 markets, boosting its overseas haul to $62 million. The racing drama starring Christian Bale and Matt Damon has earned $143 million globally, led by Russia with $8.8 million, the U.K. with $6.7 million and France with $6.4 million. The movie opens next weekend in Korea and Thailand, followed by Japan in January. A theatrical release date in China has yet to be determined.


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messaggio 1/12/2019, 22:02
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Il film parla di tanti segreti...Show Yourself è stato il segreto musicale per noi spettatori. Ora che l'han "lasciata andare" sento che la proporranno agli Oscar, magari anche con un nuovo lancio di una cover eseguita da una cantante famosa, chi lo sa. Pure congetture di un fan che è appena uscito dalla sala e non vede l'ora di cantarla tra i suoi boschi heart.gif .

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messaggio 3/12/2019, 0:59
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Dal sito Collider:

‘Frozen 2’ Songwriters Bobby and Kristen Lopez on the Sequel’s Original Opening Scene

One of the main reasons the entire planet loves Frozen is Bobby and Kristen Lopez. The husband-and-wife songwriting team are responsible for composing the songs featured in both films and their fantastic contributions are being sung all around the world every day. In addition, they wrote “Remember Me” for Pixar’s Coco, and Bobby Lopez is the youngest EGOT winner in history (Emmy, a Grammy, an Oscar and a Tony Award) thanks to his work on The Book of Mormon, Avenue Q and The Wonder Pets.

With Frozen 2 now playing in theaters, I recently sat down with Bobby and Kristen Lopez to talk about making the highly anticipated sequel. During the wide-ranging conversation they talked about how they write the music, all the songs they wrote for Frozen and Frozen 2 that were not included and why, what song came the closest to making the sequel but was ultimately removed and why, if they felt a lot of pressure making the sequel, how the villain of the film “is what goes on in our own selves and our own emotions that stop us from being as powerful as we possibly could”, how far along did they get on writing the music for Gigantic (a Disney animated movie that was cancelled), and so much more. In addition, I asked what show they wish they could write a guest musical episode and they revealed why it would have been The Good Place.

Directed by Jennifer Lee and Chris Buck and produced by Peter Del Vecho, Frozen 2 takes Anna (Kristen Bell), Elsa (Idina Menzel), Kristoff (Jonathan Groff), and Olaf (Josh Gad) on an all-new adventure that finds Anna and Elsa investigating the truth behind their parents—and possibly Elsa’s powers. The sequel also features the voices of Evan Rachel Wood, Alfred Molina, Martha Plimpton, Jason Ritter, Ciarán Hinds, Jeremy Sisto, Alan Tudyk, and Rachel Matthews.

Check out what Bobby and Kristen Lopez had to say below.

Collider: So the film got announced, I believe, four years ago, if I’m not mistaken.


BOBBY LOPEZ: Something like that.

I wrote it down, actually.

BOBBY: The last one came out six years ago.

In 2015. March 12th, 2015.

KRISTEN: Oh, whoa.

So my question is, how long ago did you actually know the sequel was going to happen, and were you holding it back?

KRISTEN: I’m actually going to say we knew maybe a week before it got announced. We were already working on the Broadway show with Jen, and I think she called us that week and was…

BOBBY: “You didn’t hear it from me.”

KRISTEN: … “Hey, guys. You didn’t hear from me but Frozen 2 is happening. And Bob is going to announce it on the shareholder meeting,” or whatever. So we had a week to adjust before it went public.

That’s actually not bad. You didn’t have to hold the secret in for that long.

KRISTEN: No.

So it gets announced. And I’m curious, what happens from that moment to where we’re at now? I mean, they announce it and then do they even have the idea yet? Or is it sort of, at that moment, it’s all then coming together?

BOBBY: They had a very broad idea that involves the ending of the movie of what we now have, and they had the theme and the emotional territory that they really wanted to go on, and they had done a lot of work with the characters, exploring them and finding out who they really were deep down. And that, just that whole idea of “we want to go deeper, we want to go more mature, and we want to explore what happens next and how they change when they realize they’re not really where they’re meant to be.” That just led us up, because it was like deepening the franchise and they… we could feel the potential of it. The potential for story, for songs, potential for adventure and all this stuff that it needed to.

How does it work for the two of you in terms of the writing of the songs? Are you waiting for a script, or the minute you hear about the themes you start writing from the themes?

KRISTEN: Well, we’re really collaborators early on, and just talking about what are those themes and where do the characters need to go. And for this movie, Chris and Jen went really, really deep and actually took Myers Briggs tests as the characters. And then, it was a year of talking about that, but just a year of really broadening our intelligence around these two characters. We also went on research trips up to the top of the world. So we went up to, walked in Norwegian forests and glaciers and Iceland, and Jen went and did the same. And then we talked about those experiences. So that really created this playground that we knew we could then start building our story.

BOBBY: But there’s no songs happening yet, because I think you need… you need more specific information about story, like who’s where, what’s happening? That’s what not only inspires us to write, but in our work is innate with the story. It should feel seamless with the dialogue and with the movie, and it needs to… it needs to do heavy lifting in the story, so you can’t just… you don’t want to write a song that could be easily taken out of the story, because that song would feel extraneous.

One of the things might be my favorite thing in the sequel is how the movie doesn’t have a villain. I think that’s amazing. It’s so cool and unusual and brilliant. Talk a little bit about that aspect of the film and what that means to you.

KRISTEN: Well, I think Frozen 1 *and* Frozen 2 there… there’s not so much of a villain, because it really is about what’s going on inside these two amazing characters, one of who is a fairy tale. The other is a myth. And what happens when you get myth and fairy tale working hand in hand. The myth is this person who’s stronger than any of us who usually has to face something none of us can face, but you’ve got a fairy tale character right there with her, who’s all of us, and who you know is going to lead to a happy ending. And it’s really about this fun interplay of these two things and what’s going on in the emotions for each one and how they have to grow. And that’s really the villain – the villain is what goes on in our own selves and our own emotions that stop us from being as powerful as we possibly could be

Completely. But you know what I mean? There’s no person trying to get her power. It’s not one of those kinds of situations, which is something I appreciated.

BOBBY: That was one way you could imagine going, making a bigger villain, making a huge villain or something like that. But it was not the way that we wanted to go with it. We wanted to tell a story that was really about a family, a family going through, you know, real life, emotional changes. And it was reflected in the mythic and fairy tale environments that we had them go through, the forest and the elements and all of these things. You have to translate it into the language of Frozen, but it really is a real life kind of thing.

KRISTEN: Jumping in, I think I’d have to give that credit all to Jennifer Lee, because anytime someone was saying, “Ooh, there could be like a dark sun villain.”

BOBBY: Yeah, exactly right. We could write The Imperial March. I know.

KRISTEN: I’m not into telling that story. So I think that’s, that’s really to Jennifer Lee’s credit. I also think there might be something inherent in a musical, that’s inherent in the Frozen one DNA, that didn’t lend it to… would you want to really hear like a big rock ballad being like “And now I’m going to shoot you with my powers!!” It would really turn into like the worst rock musical you’ve ever heard. So I think there’s something in the DNA of Frozen 1 that has to be about what’s going on inside of us and the way that we grow and take action because of our hearts.

I’m switching gears completely for just a quick second. You guys are very, very talented. I’m sure you watch a lot of television like all of us. Is there a show currently on TV that you would love to do a guest musical episode?

KRISTEN: Oh yeah. The Good Place was the one that we were… we were even talking about that. I think Jane the Virgin [has ended], but I was, “Ooh, Jane the Virgin would be a really fun, fun one too.” Those are my two. Do you have one?

No. I think you have to have an inherent love of something. You can’t just throw somebody on something and be, “Let’s do a musical.” You have to love the characters and the world.

BOBBY: The problem with those episodes is that they always find some crazy topsy turvy reason for everything to be sad again, and it’s always a little bit silly.

KRISTEN: Bobby did one for Scrubs, about 1,000 years ago.

BOBBY: But I think in The Good Place… I mean they’re already… that show is full of weird philosophical gimmicks that deepen it. So I think you can find a way to put music to it.

So jumping back into the writing process of the songs, are there a lot of songs that actually you get pretty close to finishing and then you basically say, “Oh, this isn’t actually working”?

KRISTEN: (laughing) Oh, oh yeah.

So let me ask, do you remember how many songs you actually wrote for Frozen 2, or for Frozen 1 and for Frozen 2, and that have never really been released or seen the light of day?

KRISTEN: We have calculated this. There’s seven songs that will never see the light of day that we wrote for Frozen 2 and seven songs [that made it] in the movie, which is a better batting average than we had for Frozen 1. That’s what allows us to sleep at night. Because for Frozen 1 there were like 20 songs

BOBBY: We were trying to find the characters. We wrote a whole Elsa villain song for that one. I mean, when she was a villain… it was a lot of exploratory finding. It’d be story beating through writing songs, which is not the easiest way to do it.

Was it easier with Frozen 2, because now everyone knows these characters? Was the writing process any easier? I would argue that Frozen 2 has more pressure than a Star Wars movie because these characters are so beloved by the whole world and like, “Oh there’s a lot of people that love these characters.” Does that pressure come in?

KRISTEN: The word pressure? If I, if I had a nickel for every time I heard the word pressure this week… it’s been a constant, a unified theme. But the truth is, we can’t think like that, because you can’t create from a place of pressure. I know you probably feel this as a writer, that if someone is like “You have to write the greatest article that’s ever happened,” that is the best way to send you to binge watching or out the door.

BOBBY: I just jump out the window.

KRISTEN: Right? So we knew we couldn’t create there, and we needed to do it the same way we did before, which is all about story and trusting our collaborators. And as long as you stay in that mindset of, “We have great collaborators, we’re going to do the same thing we did. We’re going to talk a lot about what matters to us and what matters to us that we can put into these characters.” And then somehow out of that bubbles up these pages that make you have that moment where you go, “Oh, Jen, Jen, please let me write that song please right now. We’re going to hang up the phone and we’re going to go to the piano and we were going to write you a song that really captures this moment.” And then we’re writing from a place of excitement and love that we have to get out. And that’s the only way to do it.

What was the song that came closest to making the movie that actually didn’t make the movie?

BOBBY: I guess that would be “Home”, right? There’s a song called “Home” that we had written at the beginning. It always happens whenever you’re writing a show, you write an opening number that it sets up the movie you think you’re going to make or the Broadway show you think you’re going to write. And then once you’ve written the Broadway show, you have to go back and rewrite that number, because it doesn’t… because as you’ve evolved the story, it’s changed and transformed and surprised you along the way. And now you know exactly what it needs to do in order to set up the story that you want to tell. So we had this number called “Home” that was all about Anna. We realized Anna was the one that had the happy ever after. She had the most to lose from the first film, and that we wanted to set up all these things that she had and was grateful for and was afraid to lose.

And so we wrote a song called “Home”… and it was, the subtext of it was, “I am super scared to lose all this stuff. All my… all my family.” And what we realized then was, even though there was some of that that was right, we had completely ignored setting up the other characters. Elsa and Kristoff and Olaf, and we needed to lose that. It was in a lot of the screenings of the movie. And then we had to lose it. And then we wrote this other song, “Some Things Never Change.” And it had the same subtext – “everything’s going to change. But we like it now. We like the stability that we have right now, and we hope that some of that stays.” It went from Anna to Kristoff to Olaf to Elsa, and everyone got a little verse and we didn’t have to do any extra exposition that slowed down the beginning.

Because so many people love these characters and this world, is there ever any talk about some of these songs that never saw the light of day as an extra on the Blu-ray or on Disney Plus?

KRISTEN: Why yes there is. And we also, Kristen Bell just came up to us and said, “When are we doing our Hollywood Bowl show and can I sing all my cut songs?” Because she had a great song called “Spare” in the first one too, back when the premise of Frozen 1 was “the heir and the spare.” And it changed, but it was a great little song. But it led us to the Anna we all know now.

BOBBY: We love the cut songs more than the songs that get released because they’re the children that, you know, sort of stay home and don’t go to college. That remain ours.

I can’t imagine the demand. If you guys went on tour with some of the cast to do Frozen songs, I would imagine it would be one of the biggest tours of that year.

KRISTEN: I would agree. That’s a great idea. I mean when our kids are out of high school, we can do that. Until then we hang out in Brooklyn and we write new songs

How far along did you guys get on Gigantic in terms of writing?

KRISTEN: I think we wrote five or six songs for it.

BOBBY: And in that, the premise of that film changed a lot over the course of its development. But we have a lot of songs that we love from that one.

KRISTEN: And we *can* recycle some of it. We may have recycled one of them already.

Well, that’s what I was going to ask is once you write something, I guess Disney owns it, but if you want to use it in another Disney thing, does that work? Or when you’re writing it, is it not even part of Disney yet?

BOBBY: It’s possible that they revert to us. It’s always… it’s different in every contract, so we don’t really know.

I’m going to stop there and just say, thank you so much for your time. Congrats on the movie.


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veu
messaggio 4/12/2019, 0:53
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Saks dopo aver realizzato il set di bambole di Anna, Elsa e Olaf al prezzo di 30.000 dollari (!) e aver realizzato una serie di bambole dedicate a Anna ed Elsa ora ha realizzato la vetrina dedicata a Frozen 2.

Ecco il video:

Click



Qui il set di bambole dedicato a Anna, Elsa e Olaf al prezzo di 30.000 dollari:

Click


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Hiroe
messaggio 4/12/2019, 3:21
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OMG che bambole identiche ai personaggi tridimensionali!! Mai vista una precisione e cura simile! Mi sa che spulcerò il sito!


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Daydreamer
messaggio 4/12/2019, 8:31
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Da notare che Idina Menzel ha eseguito il pezzo ''Show Yourself''; forse è indicativo del fatto che inizino a proporla come pezzo trainante del film, magari in vista del premio Oscar. O forse più semplicemente perché meglio si addiceva al disvelamento di quel popo di centro commerciale che ha dato inizio alla stagione natalizia con uno show mozzafiato. Chissà la reazione della gente che ha assistito dal vivo!!

Messaggio modificato da Daydreamer il 4/12/2019, 8:33


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Scrooge McDuck
messaggio 4/12/2019, 10:37
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CITAZIONE (Daydreamer @ 4/12/2019, 7:31) *
Da notare che Idina Menzel ha eseguito il pezzo ''Show Yourself''; forse è indicativo del fatto che inizino a proporla come pezzo trainante del film, magari in vista del premio Oscar. O forse più semplicemente perché meglio si addiceva al disvelamento di quel popo di centro commerciale che ha dato inizio alla stagione natalizia con uno show mozzafiato. Chissà la reazione della gente che ha assistito dal vivo!!


Il montaggio del video è un po’ furbetto, se ne trova un altro su YouTube dove si vede lo sguardo abbastanza preoccupato di Idina mentre canta.
Dopo le esibizioni live tutt’altro che riuscite agli Oscar e a New York con Let it go mi aspettavo un’esibizione pulita e precisa, invece anche questa volta l’ho trovata deludente


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messaggio 4/12/2019, 11:09
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CITAZIONE (Scrooge McDuck @ 4/12/2019, 9:37) *
Il montaggio del video è un po’ furbetto, se ne trova un altro su YouTube dove si vede lo sguardo abbastanza preoccupato di Idina mentre canta.
Dopo le esibizioni live tutt’altro che riuscite agli Oscar e a New York con Let it go mi aspettavo un’esibizione pulita e precisa, invece anche questa volta l’ho trovata deludente

Visto anch'io, non sembrava sinceramente una cantante professionista in quel momento. mellow.gif


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Daydreamer
messaggio 4/12/2019, 20:27
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Ci si accorge subito che ha eseguito il pezzo con note più basse, l'acuto l'ha proprio evitato. Lì per lì mi son detto, "fa un freddo becco e non vorrà danneggiare le corde vocali", però anch'io ho ricordato le steccate passate e ho temuto un po' ad ascoltarla tongue.gif. Evidentemente ha preferito non rischiare.

Messaggio modificato da Daydreamer il 4/12/2019, 20:29


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nicolino
messaggio 4/12/2019, 20:35
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Si ma, scusate, una volta il freddo, un’altra l’emozione... ma è dai tempi di Wicked che in ogni esibizione il cui video circola sul Web la storia si ripete con Idina Menzel. Io, personalmente, non ho mai trovato un’esibizione di Let it go dove riesca a prendere le note giuste. Ma nemmeno di defying gravity, eh. Come già detto da qualcun’altro, una vera cantante si riconosce dal vivo, e non solo in sala di registrazione!
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messaggio 4/12/2019, 20:37
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CITAZIONE (nicolino @ 4/12/2019, 19:35) *
Si ma, scusate, una volta il freddo, un’altra l’emozione... ma è dai tempi di Wicked che in ogni esibizione il cui video circola sul Web la storia si ripete con Idina Menzel. Io, personalmente, non ho mai trovato un’esibizione di Let it go dove riesca a prendere le note giuste. Ma nemmeno di defying gravity, eh. Come già detto da qualcun’altro, una vera cantante si riconosce dal vivo, e non solo in sala di registrazione!


Amen eheheh.gif


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