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> Aladdin - il musical
vale274
messaggio 3/8/2011, 16:19
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Ammazza Aladdin! mf_dribble.gif
Jasmine invece.. thumbdown.gif


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Cenerentolino
messaggio 19/8/2011, 9:09
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Al in versione "street-rat" non mi piace proprio not.gif mentre sta abbastanza bene come Principe happy.gif
Jasmine bellissima....JAFAR!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! worshippy.gif worshippy.gif worshippy.gif worshippy.gif Innamorato.gif Innamorato.gif Innamorato.gif Innamorato.gif


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Beast
messaggio 14/8/2012, 12:52
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Al Destination D Alan Menken ha lasciato intendere che il musical di Aladdin sbarcherà a Broadway!

REPORT: ALAN MENKEN SAYS ‘ALADDIN’ HEADING TO BROADWAY

Last night, Alan Menken held an intimate performance as part of the ‘Destination D’ event at the Disneyland Resort, held by Disney D23, the official fan club of The Walt Disney Company (NYSE:DIS). After wowing the attending crowd with music from decades of his Tony, Grammy and Oscar-winning career (he holds the record for having the most Oscars (living)), he closed the show with ‘Proud of Your Boy,’ a song that was intended for the original 1992 film, but was cut due to story changes.

It was when introducing the song that Menken mentioned the musical is currently being tweaked for a Broadway run, according to reports from attendees. A new staged version of the musical was produced by Disney Theatrical and premiered at the 5th Avenue Theatre in Seattle last year, but no aspirations for Broadway were anywhere to be found — at best, a national tour; at worst, licensing to regional theater. Howard Ashman’s sister, Sarah, wrote about the musical on her tribute blog, Part Of Your World, and some of the changes that were incorporated into it that deviate it from the beloved animated film. In addition to ‘Proud of Your Boy,’ three other songs that were initially cut have been reinstated along: Call Me A Princess; High Adventure; and Babkak, Omar, Aladdin, Kassim, which brings along the three non-Aladdin characters with it.

After a brief run at The Muny in July, the musical is now in production at the Tuacahn Amphitheatre in Utah through mid-October and has managed to incorporate the use of 3D glasses for the Cave of Wonders and Genie’s ‘Friend Like Me’ song, courtesy of former Walt Disney Imagineer Geoff Puckett, according to the fan-based Aladdin Musical blog.


Still, prior to last night, there wasn’t so much as an inkling that it would soon find itself on the Great White Way. Actually, an inkling may in fact have been all there was, as a thread on Broadway World points to a cryptic message at the end of a recent video update from 5th Avenue Theatre:


The video, posted on July 27 features David Armstrong, Executive Producer & Artistic Director of ‘Saving Aimee,’ a production that is currently making the Broadway transition. At the end of the video, however, Armstrong indicates that other 5th Avenue productions are about to make the same move and promises updates shortly.


http://www.stitchkingdom.com/disney-aladdin-broadway-21773/

Ecco Menken al piano suonare Proud of your boy per il pubblico del Destination D durante il concerto di chiusura:



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warhol_84
messaggio 15/8/2012, 13:56
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Ed era l'ora! Visto che Aladdin fra tutti i titoli Disney insieme a La bella e La Bestia e Hercules è proprio quello dal sapore più broadwaiano...invece di quegli aborti della Sirenetta e Tarzan! Certo, secondo me, dovranno fare molta molta attenzione a trovare una regia innovativa e che non diventi una pacchianata col il tappeto che vola con i fili appesi....non se ne può più di gente che svolazza appesa ai fili a new york. I presupposti per un top musical a la Wicked ci sono tutti....bisogna vedere se non rovinano tutto.
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veu
messaggio 5/2/2013, 0:31
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Aladdin arriverà a Broadway nel 2014...

Dal sito D23:

Disney’s Aladdin, a New Broadway Musical, to Open at Toronto’s Ed Mirvish Theatre for Nine Weeks November 2013

01.25.13 – Disney Theatrical Productions proudly announces that Aladdin, a new musical based on the Academy Award®-winning animated film, will play its pre-Broadway engagement at Toronto’s Ed Mirvish Theatre (formerly the Canon) November 13, 2013, to January 12, 2014, and will open at Broadway’s New Amsterdam Theatre in 2014.



Disney Theatrical Productions proudly announces that Aladdin, a new musical based on the Academy Award®-winning animated film, will play its pre-Broadway engagement at Toronto’s Ed Mirvish Theatre (formerly the Canon) November 13, 2013, to January 12, 2014, and will open at Broadway’s New Amsterdam Theatre in 2014. The show will feature music by Alan Menken; lyrics by the late Howard Ashman, Tim Rice and Chad Beguelin; with a book by Beguelin. Casey Nicholaw will direct and choreograph.

This will be the first staging of this full-length two-act Aladdin. Nicholaw and the writers had previously collaborated on a well-received pilot production of the musical at Seattle’s 5th Avenue Theatre in summer 2011 mounted for a limited run with the goal of trying out new material and structure. Broadway will be an entirely new production featuring a new script, tunestack and a wholly original design scaled to the Broadway stage and an epic story.

Aladdin, adapted from centuries-old Arabian folktales including “One Thousand and One Nights,” will feature a full Broadway score including the five beloved songs from the film.

Aladdin will be designed by six-time Tony®-winning scenic designer Bob Crowley, three-time Tony-winning lighting designer Natasha Katz, two-time Tony-winning costume designer Gregg Barnes and sound designer Ken Travis. The production team also includes illusion designer Jim Steinmeyer and hair designer Josh Marquette. The music team is headed by music supervisor and music director Michael Kosarin, who will also create the vocal and incidental music arrangements, joined by orchestrator Danny Troob and dance music arranger Glen Kelly.

Casting, Broadway dates and ticket information for both Toronto and Broadway will be announced at a later date. To receive news about Aladdin in the coming months, please sign up for email alerts at aladdinbroadway.com.



Sito Ufficiale:

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veu
messaggio 14/2/2013, 0:22
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Dal sito Playbill:

So we have "Proud of Your Boy," a number that Aladdin was originally to sing in the movie to his mother directly, but now it's to his mother in heaven. There's a number "Babkak, Omar, Aladdin and Kassim," which is kind of the friends' Vaudeville number that they do in the streets of Agrabah. There's a song called "High Adventure," where they perform a rescue at the end of Act Two, which is so much fun. It's one of those numbers I was dying to see on stage. There's "Call Me Princess" for Princess Jasmine, which was a real early throw-away, but we were able to make use of that thanks to my new collaboration with Chad Beguelin, who wrote the book.

He was brilliant in finding ways to adapt songs we had originally written into the new book, and we also wrote three new songs together with him as my lyricist. We wrote one new song for the Genie, one new song for Jafar and a new duet for Aladdin and Jasmine — and we still have all the original songs from Howard Ashman and Tim Rice from the film. So much creative energy has gone into this new Aladdin, I love it. We had a production in Seattle that was one of the highlights of my life and we've even improved it since then.


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Daydreamer
messaggio 14/2/2013, 17:07
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Ottimo ...Non vedo l'ora di ascoltare l'assolo di Jasmine e l'altro duetto con Al ... !! smile.gif


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Arancina22
messaggio 31/8/2013, 13:45
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Il musical di Aladdin è pronto per aprire a Broadway!
Il debutto sarà a Toronto l'1/11, poi le preview inizieranno dal 26/2/2014 per arrivare alla serata d'apertura ufficiale il 20/3.
Ci saranno ovviamente nuove canzoni, ma anche nuovi personaggi.
Alcune altre info nell'articolo!

Articolo

Saluto.gif


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veu
messaggio 21/2/2014, 0:46
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Primo video del look dei personaggi:

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Personaggi:

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Arancina22
messaggio 21/2/2014, 16:50
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Che opulenza, che meraviglia!!! Non vedo l'ora!!!


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warhol_84
messaggio 21/2/2014, 18:03
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JAsmine è semplicemente meravigliosa e Aladdin è stupendo. Ho sempre un po' di perplessità su un Genio non Blu...ma capisco le motivazioni.
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Scrooge McDuck
messaggio 22/2/2014, 0:49
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Dopo aver ricevuto il battesimo del fuoco coi musical Disney, ora ho una voglia matta di vederne altri Innamorato.gif

Chissà se arriverà mai in Europa smile.gif tongue.gif


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Filippo
messaggio 22/2/2014, 1:02
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Speriamo arrivi anche qui. Amo Aladdin e ho sempre desiderato vederne il musical. Qualcuno sa se uscirà il CD con tutte le musiche sta volta? Perchè tempo fa , quando l'hanno fatto a Toronto , non c'è stato mai un Ost .


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Arancina22
messaggio 22/2/2014, 2:35
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Per la versione di Broadway credo proprio esca sicuramente. smile.gif


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Scissorhands
messaggio 11/3/2014, 12:04
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Ho visto che Aladdin è uscito da due settimane ed è in preview! Sapete come sono state le review? I commenti di utenti di forum NON sono affatto positivi sad.gif

Messaggio modificato da Scissorhands il 12/3/2014, 12:19


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Scrooge McDuck
messaggio 11/3/2014, 13:23
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CITAZIONE (Scissorhands @ 11/3/2014, 11:04) *
I commenti di utenti di forum NON sono affatto positive sad.gif


Azzz sad.gif


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Scissorhands
messaggio 21/3/2014, 15:20
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Prime recensioni ufficiali... diciamo che poteva essere peggio; credo che anche la critica stessa si sia abituata a questo tipo di produzioni, che altro non sono che dei "bei" carrozzoni (nel senso che sono belli da guardare, divertenti e niente più). Insomma Aladdin sembra non fare eccezione... i turisti saranno contenti smile.gif
Applausi soprattutto per il genio, grande mattatore dello show. Menzioni non particolarmente di merito (ma neanche di demerito) per le nuove canzoni di Menken.

Comunque pare che Iago sia umano e che Abu sia stata sostituita da tre amici di Aladdin. Anche la tigre Raja è stata eliminata.

Variety
http://variety.com/2014/legit/reviews/broa...din-1201140780/
Broadway Review: ‘Disney Aladdin’

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Aladdin reviews Broadway
MARCH 20, 2014 | 06:29PM PT
This super-costly extravaganza doesn't do justice to the movie, or to the spirit of the late Howard Ashman.

Marilyn Stasio
The magic-carpet ride is magical. The Cave of Wonders is wonderful. And yes, you’ll hear the tunes you loved in the 1992 movie. But the notion that “Disney Aladdin” somehow resurrects the spirit of the late Howard Ashman, who had the original inspiration for the movie and contributed most of its clever lyrics, is a joke. Restoring a person’s work without respecting his artistic sensibility is no tribute at all.

If this super-costly Disney extravaganza doesn’t really represent Ashman’s artistic vision, whose vision does it reflect? Chad Beguelin (“Elf,” “The Wedding Singer”), who wrote the book and contributed new lyrics, obviously plays a significant role, as does Alan Menken, who scored the film and wrote new songs for the show. Even more so does helmer-choreographer Casey Nicholaw (“The Book of Mormon”), who stylistically turns the film’s romantic fairy-tale adventure into shtick comedy.

Bob Crowley, a six-time Tony winner (for Disney’s “Aida” and “Mary Poppins,” among others), is likely to pick up another one for imaginative sets that capture both the fun and the storybook wonder of the folk tale. For the eye-popping opening number, “Arabian Nights,” Crowley has designed a colorful marketplace in the kingdom of Agrabah that is visually anchored by revolving setpieces that telescope into whimsical new forms. He uses the same telescoping technique in the Cave of Wonders, where towers of treasure (cast in golden lights by Natasha Katz) await Aladdin.

Working from what looks like a million-plus budget, costumer Gregg Barnes (“Kinky Boots”) makes a dazzling first impression with vibrant colors and graceful silhouettes, and rich materials that are intricately embroidered and elaborately ornamented. But in the spirit of overkill that comes to define the entire production, the costumes become so heavily encrusted with bling, it’s a wonder anyone can move in them.

How thesps carry their costumes is a fair indicator of how they carry their roles. Adam Jacobs, who is young and cute enough to have played Simba the lion cub in “The Lion King,” is a personable performer with a pleasant enough voice to make an appealing Aladdin. He stiffens up in the princely garments of “Prince Ali of Ababwa,” the bogus monarch whose identity Aladdin buys with the first of his three precious wishes, but he unbends and puts his heart into “Proud of Your Boy.” And he’s quite charming in “A Whole New World,” the gorgeous number that takes Aladdin and Princess Jasmine (Courtney Reed, unkindly stuck in a ghastly belly-dancer schmatta) on their magic carpet ride.

The versatile James Monroe Iglehart not only pulls off his garish Genie costume; he practically walks off with the show in “Friend Like Me,” an extremely flashy production number that, at one preview performance, was a bona fide showstopper. When Robin Williams riffed on the same number in the movie, he fooled around with funny voices and celebrity sendups. Iglehart, a big man with a big man’s capacity for play, shows off Genie’s magical powers by turning to the Broadway musical-theater canon — starting with Disney’s own “Beauty and the Beast” and “The Little Mermaid,” and moving on to classic shows like “West Side Story, “A Chorus Line,” and even an “Arabic” interpretation of “Fiddler on the Roof.” The conceit doesn’t say much for choreographic originality, but, hey, it works. And Iglehart sells it.

Other changes to the original material are less successful, especially the contemporary updates to book and lyrics that replace the tone of fairy-tale innocence with show-queen vulgarity. And then there are the variations that are downright disastrous: It was a really bad idea to replace Iago, the sardonic parrot familiar of the evil vizier, Jafar (Jonathan Freeman, as impressive as he was in the film), with an annoying human henchman played by an annoying actor. A worse idea was replacing Abu, Aladdin’s rascal monkey friend, with three of the hero’s dumber-than-dirt slacker pals. As for the cheap jokes sprinkled throughout the book, the most unspeakable one comes in the prologue, when Genie produces a tacky miniature of the Statue of Liberty and excuses himself for “a little pre-show shopping.”

Oh, you don’t mean to say that there might be a profit motive in all this?


Hollywood Reporter
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/review/al...r-review-690038
Aladdin: Theater Review

While it doesn't rival the imagination or innovation of "The Lion King," the show's ebullient comic spirit should make it a popular hit.
Venue
New Amsterdam Theatre, New York (runs indefinitely)
Cast
Adam Jacobs, James Monroe Iglehart, Courtney Reed, Jonathan Freeman, Brian Gonzales, Brandon O'Neill, Jonathan Schwartz, Clifton Davis, Don Darryl Rivera
Director-choreographer
Casey Nicholaw
Disney's latest animated movie musical to get a Broadway makeover is the 1992 fairy tale set in a fictional Middle Eastern kingdom, featuring songs by Alan Menken and Howard Ashman.

NEW YORK -- Its exotic Middle Eastern setting and multiethnic cast aside, Aladdin offers less "A Whole New World" -- to quote its signature song -- than a traditional Disney fairy-tale realm; it's perhaps the most old-school of the company's screen-to-stage adaptations since Beauty and the Beast. But that shouldn't deter audiences from making this splashy Arabian Nights wish-fulfillment fantasy into a family-friendly hit. Directed and choreographed by musical comedy specialist Casey Nicholaw with loads of retro showmanship, an unapologetic embrace of casbah kitsch and a heavy accent on shtick, this is sweet, silly fun. It's not the most sophisticated entertainment, but the target demographic won't mind at all.
OUR EDITOR RECOMMENDS

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The 1992 release followed The Little Mermaid and Beauty and the Beast in Disney's renaissance of the animated feature musical, heralding the valiant final resurgence of hand-drawn toon artistry before computer animation took hold. The film was notable for its shift beyond the princess focus to a more boy-centric story, and for being among the first cases of major celebrity voice casting becoming central to the production's marketing, via Robin Williams' role as the motormouth Genie.
It was also the final collaboration between composer Alan Menken and lyricist Howard Ashman before the latter's death due to AIDS complications in 1991. The team completed eleven songs for Aladdin, only a handful of which made it into the movie; several of the others have found an afterlife here. Tim Rice stepped in to complete work on the film's score with Menken, while Chad Beguelin (The Wedding Singer, Elf), the book writer on this stage adaptation, contributes additional lyrics. Irrespective of who wrote what, the songs are tuneful, if not quite top-drawer.
Nicholaw won a 2011 Tony Award as co-director with Trey Parker of The Book of Mormon. But the most indicative precursor of his work here was his staging of "Show Off," the hilariously insincere disavowal of a Broadway star's natural spotlight-seeking tendencies, performed with brio by Sutton Foster in The Drowsy Chaperone. That same more-is-more, irrepressibly over-the-top shamelessness defines the twin showstoppers that bookend intermission in Aladdin.
The first is "Friend Like Me," in which the Genie (James Monroe Iglehart), freshly uncorked from his lamp, previews the infinite gifts available to his astonished new master, Aladdin (Adam Jacobs). Starting with Iglehart doing a Cab Calloway-esque scat, Nicholaw builds the song into a mammoth production number, with a chorus of whirling valets and showgirls, a "Dancing with the Scimitars" ballroom break, a step or two of hoedown, a game-show interlude, a mini-medley of Disney tunes from other musicals, an exuberant tap routine and a finale with canes and a kickline. While Williams' vocal performance in the movie was quite large, Iglehart's high-energy turn is perhaps even larger, whether he's dropping in winking pop-cultural anachronisms (he quotes Sweet Brown at one point) or firing off hoary one-liners like a Catskills comic. He's a delight.
The follow-up song, again led by the indefatigable Iglehart, is "Prince Ali," a royal procession that makes Elizabeth Taylor's Cleopatra entrance look like a casual stroll. Replete with Vegas-style fan dancers, peacocks and the now-regulation streamer explosion, this takes place after the Genie has transformed Aladdin from street scruff into a regal suitor worthy of Princess Jasmine (Courtney Reed), the feisty Sultan's daughter feeling cramped inside the palace walls.
Beguelin's book is larded with gags but sticks more or less to the movie. The main addition is a trio of vaudevillian comic sidekicks for Aladdin, (Brandon O'Neill, Jonathan Schwartz and Brian Gonzalez), replacing his kleptomaniac monkey onscreen. (Jasmine's tiger has also been nixed.) These guys were part of Ashman's concept for the film, and their jaunty songs are enjoyable, particularly "High Adventure," even if they sometimes outstay their welcome.

The opening number, "Arabian Nights," is a busy riot of marketplace scene-setting and souk-chic fashion, in which the Genie reminds us that, "Even our poor people look faaabulous!" That goes double for buff Aladdin, in his artfully patched Hammer-time pants. Beaming like a toothpaste commercial model, Jacobs packs plenty of charm into the role, and is an ideal incarnation of the handsome Disney cartoon hero -- now with lifelike nipples and body hair! He also brings tenderness to his warm rendition of "Proud of Your Boy," in which the orphaned urchin dreams of becoming more than a street thief.
But the romantic pulse of Aladdin is a little faint. Jasmine is a less captivating version of Belle and Ariel before her, spouting generic female-empowerment refrains but never acquiring much dimension as a character. Her magic carpet flight with Aladdin during "A Whole New World" is a technological marvel (no visible trace of cables or lift mechanisms), set against the star-strewn velvet of lighting designer Natasha Katz's night sky. But the scene lacks enchantment because the chemistry between Aladdin and Jasmine isn't quite there. While Reed sings sweetly, she's more like a curvy Kardashian than a Disney princess, and her trio of fly-girl attendants could sub for Destiny's Child. (I swear, I kept listening for the opening guitar lick from "Bootylicious," waiting for someone to ask, "Kelly, can you handle this?")
Beguelin looks for the true heart of the musical in the intertwined quests of Aladdin to be an honorable man and the Genie to be a free one. But while both actors are winning presences, their storylines bump along with the jokey buddy dynamic of a Bob Hope-Bing Crosby movie (think Road to Morocco), limiting the emotional pull.
In leaning so heavily on the campy humor (yes, there are "Walk Like an Egyptian" dance moves aplenty) the creative team has slightly shortchanged the show on earnest sentimentality, which for better or worse is an essential Disney ingredient. That makes Aladdin's appeal somewhat juvenile, though plenty of adults with a taste for broad comedy will eagerly get on board. The cartoonish aspect is enhanced by the mugging villains: Jafar (Jonathan Freeman, reprising the vizier role he voiced in the film), and his diminutive henchman, Iago, no longer a parrot but a sneering human sycophant who, in Don Darryl Rivera's amusing performance, seems spliced from the DNA of Danny DeVito and Matt Lucas.
Bob Crowley's pretty sets appear lifted from storybook illustrations and classic animation backgrounds, but the most lavish design element by far is Gregg Barnes' endless parade of costumes. Their rich textures and vibrant colors are frequently embellished with beads, brocades, tassels and trinkets, accessories that are available in more modest versions at the lobby merchandise stand. Ka-ching!


Broadway World
http://www.broadwayworld.com/article/BWW-R...21#.UywQfdzBz9g

BWW Reviews: Disney Does Musical Comedy Right With ALADDIN


They used to call them tired businessman musicals; fast-moving, slickly-produced musical comedies that livened up evenings for overworked white-collar gents with lots of gags, some catchy tunes and pretty chorus girls in sexy outfits. They weren't meant to be art. They were meant to be hits.

BWW Reviews: Disney Does Musical Comedy Right With ALADDIN
Courtney Reed and Adam Jacobs (Photo: Deen Van Meer)
Well, believe it or not, the latest entry in Disney's Broadway parade might be considered a 21st Century variation on the theme. Call Aladdin, based on the 1992 animated feature, a tired businessperson's musical. The laughs are plentiful, the songs are bright and jazzy, there's not an actor dressed as an animal (or inanimate object) in sight and romance and cuteness are kept to a minimum, as are many of the costumes worn by both male and female cast members.

The hot Broadway orchestrations by Danny Troob and the sight gag about New York souvenir shopping barely a minute into the script are early signs that the Arabian nights setting is not going to be taken very literally in director/choreographer Casey Nicholaw's fast and funny production. The setting, Agrabah, is said to have "more glitz and glamour than any other fictional city in the world!" Chad Beguelin's book is written in jaunty contemporary English, full of pop culture jokes and ridiculous puns, and the multicultural cast members make no attempt to look or sound like a middle eastern cliché. Think vaudeville, think borscht belt, but don't think too much.

Composer Alan Menken's film score (with Howard Ashman and Tim Rice each contributing lyrics) is augmented by new numbers with words by Beguelin.

Playing it straight and spunky are Adam Jacobs, as the poverty-stricken title character who steals for survival, and Courtney Reed as the young princess who wishes for a chance to marry for love and be an equal partner to her husband, instead of following her aging father's desire that she marry a prince who will rule over the land. ("Why are you so determined to pawn me off to any Tom, Dick or Hassim that comes our way?")

BWW Reviews: Disney Does Musical Comedy Right With ALADDIN
James Monroe Iglehart (Photo: Cylla von Tiedemann)
The couple meets when the princess, Jasmine, tries to escape from the palace disguised as a commoner, but it isn't long before she's caught and sent back to her royal digs. Needing to pass himself off as a prince in order to court her, Aladdin gets assistance from a magic genie from a lamp (James Monroe Iglehart), who has the power to grant wishes and to stop Broadway shows dead in their tracks.

A large man with a big voice and a mega-watt smile, Iglehart takes over the proceedings Groucho Marx style, spewing a rapid-fire succession of non-sequitur irreverence like an over-caffeinated Vegas lounge emcee. ("Come for the hummus, stay for the floorshow!")

Late in the first act, Nicholaw builds a hilarious production number around him to the clever "Friend Like Me", loaded with showgirls and showboys, shout-outs to Let's Make A Deal, Dancing With The Stars, Oprah Winfrey ("You get a wish! You get a wish!") and an American Idol type medley of Disney hits. The light-footed Iglehart shticks his way through the mini-spectacle with frenetic charm and killer pipes.

But he's not the only one delivering the comical goods. Jonathan Freeman seems to be having a ball channeling Cyril Ritchard as the deliciously evil Jafar, the role he voiced in the original film. His henchman, Iago, played as a parrot in the movie, is now a wisecracking wart of a human, terrifically embodied by Don Darryl Rivera. Aladdin's monkey pal has also been replaced by humans; a Ritz Brothers style trio of singing, dancing and sword-playing buffoons played by Brian Gonzales, Jonathan Schwartz and Brandon O'Neill.

The splendidly opulent designs by Bob Crowley (sets), Gregg Barnes (costumes) and Natasha Katz (lights) splash the stage with colorful pastels and glimmering golds. The technological coup of the evening is a full-stage magic carpet ride among the stars as Jacobs and Reed fall in love to "A Whole New World."

But the real magic of Aladdin is watching the talented company plunge into Nicholaw's wild and crazy staging with the sole intention of entertaining the pants off of you like it's nobody's business.


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Scissorhands
messaggio 21/3/2014, 15:26
Messaggio #66


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Altre recensioni qui:
http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20364394_20798645,00.html

http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20364394_20798645,00.html

Recap qui:
http://www.broadwayworld.com/board/readmes...0671&page=1
e qui
http://www.didhelikeit.com/shows/aladdin-reviews.html

Mah... poteva andare peggio... l'idea è che la critica non si è accanita contro il musical come con la Sirenetta e Tarzan... ma non siamo ai livelli di Mary Poppins o Newsies...


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roxirodisney
messaggio 22/3/2014, 11:34
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Aladdin on Broadway - A million miles away



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Arancina22
messaggio 22/3/2014, 16:30
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Beh dai, almeno non è stato uno stroncamento completo.

La canzone che hai messo tu Roxi mi piace moltissimo happy.gif
Peccato per il valzerino, lo trovo un po' anacronistico. E gli attori sono un po' impalati o sbaglio? Boh, forse è la canzone che non è particolarmente movimentata.
Jasmine è davvero splendida comunque!!!


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Princesse Sophie
messaggio 25/3/2014, 17:38
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Quindi attori abbastanza ok (a parte il trio e Iago), ma molto commerciale, pieno di slang e gag su new york? Ho interpretato bene?


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Beast
messaggio 26/3/2014, 17:46
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Jim Hill ne parla piuttosto bene: http://jimhillmedia.com/editor_in_chief1/b...newest-hit.aspx


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Beast
messaggio 10/6/2014, 15:11
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Il musical ha vinto un Tony Award per il 'Miglior attore non protagonista", andato a James Monroe Iglehart (il Genio).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/68th_Tony_Awards


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Scissorhands
messaggio 30/7/2014, 16:28
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Riporto 3 interessanti articoli sul musical, la sua gestazione e i confronti col film d'animazione:

http://jimhillmedia.com/editor_in_chief1/b...d-his-life.aspx

James Monroe Iglehart, the Genie from Disney's new Broadway musical version of "Aladdin," recalls the phone call that changed his life

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PoorPoorFairFairAverageAverageGoodGoodExcellentExcellent Jim Hill 18 May 2014 9:34 PM 0
2012 is not a year that James Monroe Iglehart looks back fondly upon. Mostly because he spent a lot of that year staring at his phone, waiting for it to ring.


Adam Jacobs and James Monroe Inglehart in the 5th Avenue Theatre's 2011
production of Disney "Aladdin."

"We had done the pilot production of 'Aladdin' in Seattle at the 5th Avenue Theatre in July of 2011. And then the powers-that-be at Disney went off to decide if they really want to bring this show to Broadway," Iglehart recalled during a recent phone interview. "So I and the rest of the cast from Seattle sat around, waiting for Disney to make a decision. And we waited. And we waited. And then we waited some more. And then I heard that Disney had decided to make 'Aladdin' available to the Muny Theatre in St. Louis so that they could then produce a regional production of the show over the summer of 2012. And that news kind of broke my heart."

"And why was that exactly?," you ask. Well, ever since James and his Mom had gone to see the animated version of Disney's "Aladdin" back in 1992, he had dreamed of someday playing the Genie.

"I can remember clear as day that -- when 'Friend Like Me' finished in the movie version -- I immediately leaned over to my Mom and said 'I want to do that someday,' " Iglehart continued. "There was just something about the Genie in that specific scene that really resonates with me. He is just so happy to be out in the world again after having been trapped inside of his lamp for 10,000 years. Which is why the Genie just pulls out all the stops as he demonstrates to Aladdin what he can possibly do with his three wishes."


Copyright Disney Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved

So after having played the Genie in Seattle, James dearly wished that he'd also get the chance to play this exact same part on Broadway. But what with the 2012 production in St. Louis (not to mention a second regional production at the Tuacahn Amphitheatre in Ivins that same year), it looked as though Disney Theatrical had lost confidence in this show.

Ah, but looks can be deceiving. As it turns out, Disney Theatrical hadn't actually lost confidence in the stage musical version of "Aladdin." They just thought that the show needed a lot of work before it was then ready for Broadway. Which is why they actually made the Seattle version of "Aladdin" available for the Muny Theatre & Tuacahn Amphithreatre to produce. So that the creative team could then go view these regional productions and -- after seeing how this same material had been handled by others -- make some cold-blooded decisions about what needed to be done to fix this show.

"Now you have to understand that I actually had friends in those two regional productions of 'Aladdin.' And while I'm happy for them because they got those gigs, I'm still really sad for me because I'm not the one playing the Genie. Which is my dream part," Iglehart explained. " "But then I hear through the rumor mill that the Broadway version of 'Aladdin' really isn't dead. That what the creative team is doing now is rehauling the script, writing some new songs. And I'm just hoping & praying that when Disney finally does decide to go forward with the Broadway production that they still want me to play the Genie."


The opening scene for the Muny's production of Disney "Aladdin." And yes, those are
live full-sized camels onstage with Babkak, Omar & Kassim seated on top of them.

So let's now jump forward to the Fall of 2012. After months & months of waiting, James is told to expect a call from Disney Theatrical. Mind you, he doesn't know if this is the "You've-got-the-part!" call or the "Sorry-but-we're-going-with-somebody-else" call. All he knows is that Disney Theatrical is going to call.

"And my wife is like 'I have to go to work today. But I really want to be able to share this moment with you. So could you please record this call?,' " Iglehart remembered. "And I was like 'Well, what if they say I didn't get the role? Why would I want a recording of that?' And my wife was like 'Just tape the call for me, please?' "

So to kill time as he's waiting for this fateful phone call, James takes his niece out to buy a cell phone. And as the two of them are driving back home, Iglehart's own cell phone rings. And as he looks at the caller ID, James sees that it's Casey Nicholaw, the director-choreographer of Disney "Aladdin."


James Monroe Inglehart and Casey Nicholaw at the first day of rehearsal for the
Broadway production of Disney "Aladdin"

"And I'm like 'Oh, my God! I have to take this call!' But I'm in traffic and it's illegal to answer your cell phone while you're driving. So I let it go to voicemail while I find a place to park," Iglehart said. "Once the car is parked, before I call Casey back, I turn to my niece and say 'Get your cell phone out and tape this. Your aunt wants to see what happens next.' "

And what did happen next? Well, see for yourself.


Yes, James' wish had finally come true. He was going to get to play the Genie again. Ah, but there were a few provisos, a couple of quid pro quos. Chief among them being that "Aladdin" wasn't actually going straight to Broadway. The show was first heading to Toronto for a lengthy out-of-town at the Ed Mirvish Theatre.

"And do you remember how bad this past winter was? Well, we went through that up in Canada. Which is where winter comes from," Iglehart laughed. "But we'd mush through the snow to the theater and just rehearse & rehearse because the creative team was continually reworking the show. In fact, we were making changes right up until we left Toronto."

And James only learned about one of these proposed changes just before he flew home to NYC.


Copyright Disney Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved

"I am literally about to head out to the airport when a member of the creative team walks up to me, hands me an envelope and whispers 'Don't open this until you get on the plane,' " Iglehart states. "So I do just like this guy says. I wait to open this envelope 'til I'm actually in my seat on that plane. And what's inside for a brand-new opening for the show where the Genie leads the cast in singing 'Arabian Nights' which Casey wants us all to start rehearsing once we get back to New York."

Which gave James some pause. Given that -- up until now -- the opening number for Disney "Aladdin" has been sung by the show's trio of narrators, Omar (Jonathan Schwartz), Kassim (Brandon O'Neill) and Babkak (Brian Gonzales).

"And Brian Gonzalez is like my best friend on the planet. So I really couldn't go through with this change without first getting Brian's blessing," Iglehart recalled. "So I called him and Brian said -- on behalf of the trio -- that they were okay with the change. That whatever it took to make sure that 'Aladdin' became the best possible show before it opened on Broadway, they were willing to do. That's the caliber of the people that I'm working with here at the New Amsterdam. That's how generous & talented they are."


Copyright Disney Enterprises, Inc. All rights reserved

That's why every night -- as James is onstage performing "Friend Like Me" -- he makes a point of making eye contact with every other cast member who's out there making this 8 minute-long production number stop the show.

"As I keep telling these guys backstage, you're the real reason we get a standing ovation every night. Without you, I'd just be a big black guy in a blue suit who sings 'Can your friends do this? Can your friends do that?' as he points around an empty stage," Iglehart said. "I'm just so blessed to be part of this cast, to have Disney entrust with this role that I've always dreamed of playing."

That's why James always makes a point to spend a little extra time with those people who turn up at the stage door at the New Amsterdam and want to get a selfie with the Genie. Because he remembers all too well the important part a cell phone played in making his own lifelong dream come true.


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